Cardiovascular Disease (CVD)

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Lab Testing and health information

Do you want to learn more about your cardiovascular health?

We provide cardiovascular laboratory testing to assist you in better understanding your heart's health.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in men and women in the United States. Our Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) lab tests are some of the most important blood tests to order when it comes to your heart health. These lab tests will reveal details about your cardiovascular system, including if you are at a higher risk of having a stroke, heart attack, or other serious cardiovascular disorders. This is why we recommend that all adults be tested annually. You simply cannot afford to be unaware of any issues with your cardiovascular system because early detection saves lives! 

It's never too early (or too late) to begin caring for yourself and making healthy lifestyle adjustments. The sooner you understand what's going on within your body, the greater your chances of avoiding major illness and living longer are! CVD lab panels are available from Ulta Lab Tests, enabling you to get all of these important lab tests in one place without having to go through several physicians or pay different co-pays. Our team will be there for you every step of the process, and our CVD lab panels are affordably priced so that everyone who wants this testing may get it done quickly and easily. 

Choose from the cardiovascular lab tests and panels offered below to take control of your health today. We provide quick results so you can get started on making better choices right away. Don't put off getting tested for cardiovascular disease any longer; our accurate blood tests can offer you peace of mind that your heart is in good shape. Now is the time to find out how healthy your heart is.

To help you identify organize the lab tests that may be of value to you, we have links to four cardiovascular panels below. Each Heart Panel includes a group of tests to help you establish your baseline biomarkers and understand the health of your heart based upon your health heart assessment.

CVD - 1. Low Heart Health Risk

CVD - 2. Moderate Heart Health Risk

CVD - 3. High Heart Health Risk

CVD - 4. High Heart Health Risk Plus

For more information on the Key Blood Tests to Help Identify your Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, click here.


Name Matches








CVD - 1. Low Heart Health Risk


CVD - 2. Moderate Heart Health Risk


CVD - 3. High Heart Health Risk


CVD - 4. High Heart Health Risk Plus


  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) [ 10231 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]

  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • CARDIO IQ(R) LIPOPROTEIN SUBFRACT, ION MOBILITY [ 92500 ]
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets) [ 6399 ]
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) [ 10231 ]
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss [ 461 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]

  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • CARDIO IQ(R) LIPOPROTEIN SUBFRACT, ION MOBILITY [ 92500 ]
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets) [ 6399 ]
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) [ 10231 ]
  • Cortisol, Total [ 367 ]
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss [ 461 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]
  • LP PLA2 ACTIVITY [ 94267 ]
  • Microalbumin, 24-Hour Urine with Creatinine [ 15281 ]
  • TSH [ 899 ]
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete [ 5463 ]
     

  • Albumin (ALB) [ 223 ]
  • ApoE Genotype, Cardio IQ™ [ 90649 ]
  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • CARDIO IQ(R) LIPOPROTEIN SUBFRACT, ION MOBILITY [ 92500 ]
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets) [ 6399 ]
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) [ 10231 ]
  • Cortisol, Total [ 367 ]
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss [ 461 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]
  • LP PLA2 ACTIVITY [ 94267 ]
  • Microalbumin, 24-Hour Urine with Creatinine [ 15281 ]
  • TSH [ 899 ]
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete [ 5463 ]
     

  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]

  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ™ [ 91604 ]
  • VLDL Cholesterol [ 319 ]
     

  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • Direct LDL [ 8293 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ™ [ 91604 ]
  • LP PLA2 ACTIVITY [ 94267 ]
  • VLDL Cholesterol [ 319 ]
     

  • ApoE Genotype, Cardio IQ™ [ 90649 ]
  • Apolipoprotein A1 + B [ 7018 ]
  • Direct LDL [ 8293 ]
  • hs-CRP [ 10124 ]
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios [ 19543 ]
  • Lipoprotein (A) [ 34604 ]
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ™ [ 91604 ]
  • LP PLA2 ACTIVITY [ 94267 ]
  • VLDL Cholesterol [ 319 ]
     

Reference Range(s)

  • ADMA (Asymmetric dimethylarginine)<100 ng/mL 
  • SDMA (Symmetric dimethylarginine)73-135 ng/mL

Clinical Significance

ADMA and SDMA may be measured in individuals with multiple risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease


Description: An ALT test is a blood test that is used to screen for and diagnose liver disease.

Also Known As: Alanine Aminotransferase Test, Alanine Transaminase Test, GPT Test, SGPT Test, Serum Glutamic Pyruvic Transaminase Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Alanine Transaminase test ordered?

When a person undergoes a standard health examination, ALT may be ordered as part of a full metabolic panel.

When a person has signs and symptoms of a liver problem, a healthcare provider will usually prescribe an ALT test.

Because many people with minor liver damage have no signs or symptoms, ALT may be ordered alone or in combination with other tests for persons who are at an elevated risk for liver disease. With modest liver injury, ALT levels will rise even if there are no other symptoms.

ALT may be ordered on a frequent basis during the course of treatment to establish whether the medication is effective when it is used to monitor the treatment of persons with liver disease.

What does an Alanine Transaminase blood test check for?

Alanine aminotransferase is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. It's also found in much lesser concentrations in the heart and muscles. This test determines the amount of ALT in your blood.

The enzyme ALT converts alanine, a protein amino acid, into pyruvate, an important intermediary in cellular energy production. ALT levels in the blood are low in healthy people. ALT is released into the bloodstream when the liver is injured, frequently before more evident indications of liver injury, such as jaundice, appear. As a result, ALT is a useful test for detecting liver disease early on.

The liver is a critical organ positioned directly behind the rib cage on the upper right side of the abdomen. It is engaged in a variety of vital bodily functions. The liver aids in the digestion of nutrients, creates bile to aid in fat digestion, produces a variety of essential proteins such as blood clotting factors and albumin, and breaks down potentially hazardous compounds into safe substances that the body may utilize or discard.

Damage to liver cells can be caused by a variety of factors, resulting in an elevation in ALT. The test is most useful for detecting damage caused by hepatitis or medications or other toxins that are harmful to the liver.

As part of a liver panel, ALT is frequently tested alongside aspartate aminotransferase, another liver enzyme. When the liver is injured, both ALT and AST levels rise, albeit ALT is more specific for the liver and may be the only one to rise in some circumstances. An AST/ALT ratio can be used to help distinguish between different types of liver injury and their severity, as well as to distinguish liver injury from heart or muscle damage.

Lab tests often ordered with an Alanine Transaminase test:

  • AST
  • ALP
  • GGT
  • Bilirubin
  • Liver Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Albumin
  • Total Protein
  • Prothrombin Time
  • Hepatitis Panel General

Conditions where a an Alanine Transaminase test is recommended:

  • Liver Disease
  • Hepatitis
  • Jaundice
  • Cirrhosis
  • Alcoholism
  • Wilson Disease
  • Hemochromatosis

How does my health care provider use an Alanine Transaminase test?

The alanine aminotransferase test is commonly used to diagnose liver damage. It's frequently ordered as part of a liver panel or complete metabolic panel with aspartate aminotransferase to screen for and/or diagnose liver disease.

ALT is an enzyme found mostly in liver and kidney cells. ALT is released into the bloodstream when the liver is injured. As a result, ALT is a useful test for detecting liver disease early on.

Although ALT is more specific to the liver than AST, they are both considered to be two of the most significant tests for detecting liver impairment. When AST is directly compared to ALT, an AST/ALT ratio is calculated. This ratio can assist distinguish between different types of liver disease and identify cardiac or muscle harm.

To assess which type of liver illness is present, ALT values are frequently matched to the results of other tests such as alkaline phosphatase, total protein, and bilirubin.

ALT is frequently requested to monitor the therapy of people with liver disease to evaluate if it is effective, and it can be ordered alone or in combination with other tests.

What do my ALT test results mean?

A low ALT level in the blood is normal and anticipated. The most prevalent cause of ALT levels that are higher than normal is liver disease.

Acute hepatitis and viral infections are the most common causes of very elevated ALT values. ALT levels are normally elevated for 1-2 months after acute hepatitis, but they might take up to 3-6 months to return to normal. ALT levels may also be significantly raised as a result of exposure to liver-toxic medications or other chemicals, or in situations that produce reduced blood flow (ischemia) to the liver.

In chronic hepatitis, ALT levels are frequently less than four times normal. Because ALT levels in this scenario regularly fluctuate between normal and slightly elevated, the test may be ordered frequently to observe if a trend emerges. Other reasons of mild ALT elevations include bile duct obstruction, cirrhosis, heart damage, alcohol addiction, and liver cancers.

ALT is frequently used in conjunction with an AST test or as part of a liver panel. See the Liver Panel article for more information on ALT values in relation to other liver tests.

The ALT level is usually greater than the AST level in most forms of liver disorders, and the AST/ALT ratio is low. There are a few exceptions: in alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and heart or muscle injury, the AST/ALT ratio is frequently more than 1, and it may be greater than 1 for a day or two after the onset of acute hepatitis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Apo A1 is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein A1 in the blood’s. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk. Low levels of APO A1 are associated with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and are said to predict CAD better then triglycerides and HDL does.

Also Known As: Apo A1 Test, Apo A-1 Test, Apolipoprotein A-1 Test, A-1 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting for at least 12 hours is required

When is an Apolipoprotein A1 test ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo A-I is a protein that plays a key function in lipid metabolism and is the most abundant protein in HDL, or "good cholesterol." Excess cholesterol in cells is removed by HDL, which transports it to the liver for recycling or elimination. Apo A-I levels tend to rise and fall with HDL levels, and apo A-I deficits are linked to an increased risk of CVD.

What does an Apolipoprotein A1 test check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent (hydrophobic) lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

The taxi driver is Apolipoprotein A. It permits HDL to be detected and bound by receptors in the liver at the end of the transport by activating the enzymes that load cholesterol from the tissues into HDL. Apolipoprotein A is divided into two types: apo A-I and apo A-II. Apo A-I has a higher prevalence than apo A-II. Apo A-I concentrations can be evaluated directly, and they tend to rise and fall in tandem with HDL levels. Deficiencies in apo A-I are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Lab tests often ordered with an Apolipoprotein A1 test:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where an Apolipoprotein A1 test is recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina
  • Coronary Heart Disease

How does my health care provider use an Apolipoprotein A1 test?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

An apo A-I test may be ordered in the following situations:

Assist in the diagnosis of apo A-I deficiency caused by genetic or acquired diseases.

Assist those with a personal or family history of heart disease, high cholesterol, or triglycerides in their blood.

Keep track of how well lifestyle changes and lipid therapies are working.

An apo A-I test can be ordered in conjunction with an apo B test to determine the apo B/apo A-I ratio. This ratio is occasionally used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio (which is sometimes included in a lipid profile) to assess the risk of developing CVD.

What do my Apolipoprotein A1 test results mean?

Low apo A-I levels are linked to low HDL levels and slowed elimination of excess cholesterol from the body. Low levels of apo A-I, as well as high levels of apo B, are linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Deficiencies in apo A-I are caused by a number of hereditary diseases. Abnormal lipid levels, notably excessive amounts of low-density lipoprotein, are common in people with certain illnesses. They frequently have a higher rate of atherosclerosis. Low apo A-I levels are caused by several genetic diseases.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Apo A1 and B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein A1 and Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum along with the ratio between B/A1. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk. Low levels of APO A1 are associated with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and are said to predict CAD better then triglycerides and HDL does.

Also Known As: Apo A1 and B Test, Apo A1 Test, Apo B Test, APOAB Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test, Apolipoprotein Evaluation Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting for 12 hours is required.

When are Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo A-I is a protein that plays a key function in lipid metabolism and is the most abundant protein in HDL, or "good cholesterol." Excess cholesterol in cells is removed by HDL, which transports it to the liver for recycling or elimination. Apo A-I levels tend to rise and fall with HDL levels, and apo A-I deficits are linked to an increased risk of CVD.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does Apolipoprotein A1 and B blood tests check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab or taxi. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Sticking with the taxi analogy, the driver is Apolipoprotein A. It permits HDL to be detected and bound by receptors in the liver at the end of the transport by activating the enzymes that load cholesterol from the tissues into HDL. Apolipoprotein A is divided into two types: apo A-I and apo A-II. Apo A-I has a higher prevalence than apo A-II. Apo A-I concentrations can be evaluated directly, and they tend to rise and fall in tandem with HDL levels. Deficiencies in apo A-I are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests:

  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests are recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

An apo A-I test may be ordered in the following situations:

Assist in the diagnosis of apo A-I deficiency caused by genetic or acquired diseases.

Assist those with a personal or family history of heart disease, high cholesterol, or triglycerides in their blood.

Keep track of how well lifestyle changes and lipid therapies are working.

An apo A-I test can be ordered in conjunction with an apo B test to determine the apo B/apo A-I ratio. This ratio is occasionally used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio to assess the risk of developing CVD.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein A1 and B test results mean?

Low apo A-I levels are linked to low HDL levels and slowed elimination of excess cholesterol from the body. Low levels of apo A-I, as well as high levels of apo B, are linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Deficiencies in apo A-I are caused by a number of hereditary diseases. Abnormal lipid levels, notably excessive amounts of low-density lipoprotein, are common in people with certain illnesses. They frequently have a higher rate of atherosclerosis. Low apo A-I levels are caused by several genetic diseases.

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Apolipoprotein B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk.

Also Known As: Apo B Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Apolipoprotein B test ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does an Apolipoprotein B blood test check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with an Apolipoprotein B test:

  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where an Apolipoprotein B test is recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use an Apolipoprotein B test?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein B test results mean?

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

Is apoB a heart disease risk factor? 
The markers of particle number, apoB, or LDL particle number were better at predicting the risk of heart disease than LDL-C.

There are two major forms of Apolipoprotein B, B-100 and B-48. B-100, synthesized in the liver, is the major protein in VLDL, IDL, and LDL cholesterol. B-48, synthesized in the intestines, is essential for the assembly and secretion of chylomicrons. Patients with increased concentrations of Apolipoprotein B are at increased risk of atherosclerosis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.



Knowledge is one of your greatest weapons against cardiovascular disease. No matter your age, it’s important to understand and use the tools at your disposal that can provide you with greater insight into your heart health.

Research shows that heart disease is the leading cause of death among both men and women in the United States. 

In fact, more than 600,000 people around the country die of this condition every year, accounting for one in every four deaths.

While these numbers are staggering, they don't have to define you.

Knowledge is one of your greatest weapons against cardiovascular disease. No matter your age, it's important to understand and use the tools at your disposal that can provide you with greater insight into your heart health.

This is where blood tests can be invaluable.

With a simple blood test, you can begin to take a deep dive into the specifics of how your heart is functioning, what issues are there, and what to look out for in the future. With this data in hand, you're able to make smarter decisions moving forward.

Today, we're sharing our list of the top blood tests that can help you identify your risk of cardiovascular disease and take steps to mitigate it.

Ready to learn more? Let's get started.

Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease

First, let's review what encompasses cardiovascular disease (CVD). This is an overarching term for a group of specific diseases that target your heart or blood vessels. 

Some of the most common types of CVD include:

  • Coronary artery diseases (e.g. angina, myocardial infarction/heart attack)
  • Stroke
  • Heart failure
  • Rheumatic heart disease
  • Hypertensive heart disease
  • Congenital heart disease
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Valvular heart disease
  • Carditis
  • Peripheral artery disease
  • Aortic aneurysms
  • Venous thrombosis

While this list is exhaustive, there is hope in prevention. In fact, industry studies estimate that up to 90% of CVD cases are preventable.

While the risk factors for each disease will vary, some general ones apply across the board. These include:

  • High blood pressure
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Smoking
  • Family history
  • Age
  • Sex
  • Socioeconomic status
  • Ethnicity
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Uncontrolled stress and anger
  • Diet

Did you notice those first three factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking)?

Those are the three key risk factors for heart disease, and at least one pertains to half of all Americans (47%).

All three of those are conditions that you can help curb. While there are some risk factors for heart disease that cannot be controlled, such as your age or your sex, there are many you can.

Controllable risk factors include:

  • Smoking
  • High LDL cholesterol
  • Low HDL cholesterol
  • High blood pressure
  • Physical inactivity
  • Obesity
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Uncontrolled stress and anger
  • Diet

Knowing this, is it time to make a few lifestyle adjustments? If you're ready to take a more proactive approach to your health, there are several lab tests you should consider before you get started.

These can help give you a clearer picture of your heart's current condition, as well as where you can improve. Keeping these levels in mind, you can focus your efforts more effectively.

Next, let's take a look at the lab tests that we offer to support a stronger, healthier heart.

Top Blood Tests for Heart Health 

When you're ready to take a close look at some of your risk factors for CVD, a lab test can deliver the hard data you need. Here are 27 tests to order depending on your medical concern and the information you're looking to find. 

  • 1. Lipid Panel

Lipids are a group of fats or fat-like substances in your body. They are important parts of your cells and also provide energy. A lipid panel measures the levels of certain types of lipids in your bloodstream. It also measures your total cholesterol for all of your lipoprotein particles and includes the following six biomarkers that measure:

  • Total cholesterol
  • HDL cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • LDL-cholesterol (calculated)
  • Cholesterol/HDL ratio (calculated)
  • Non-HDL cholesterol (calculated)

2. LDL Particle Testing

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are particles responsible for transporting lipids throughout your body. Each particle contains a combination of different kinds of molecules, including:

  • Protein
  • Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Phospholipids

Often called subfraction testing, LDL particle testing measures the relative amounts of these different particles in your bloodstream. 

3. CBC

Standing for Complete Blood Count, this test contains 33 biomarkers.

CBC test examines your overall health and allows physicians to look at multiple components and features of your blood. These include:

  • Red blood cells that transport oxygen
  • White blood cells that fight infection
  • Hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen, found in red blood cells
  • Hematocrit, the percentage of red blood cells in your blood (by volume)
  • Platelets that help with blood clotting

If any levels are abnormally high or low, this will alert a medical professional that there might be an underlying risk factor to consider, such as one for CVD.

4. Homocysteine

Homocysteine test measures the amount of homocysteine in your blood.

A type of amino acid, a small to moderate amount of homocysteine, is normal. However, abnormally high levels can signal the early development of heart disease.

Other conditions that can cause your homocysteine levels to spike include:

  • Low levels of vitamin B6
  • Low levels of vitamin B12
  • Low levels of folate
  • Renal disease

5. Lipoprotein (a)

There are two main kinds of cholesterol in your blood. These include:

  • High-density lipoprotein (HDL), known as "good" cholesterol
  • Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), known as "bad" cholesterol

Lipoprotein (a) is a kind of LDL cholesterol or "bad" cholesterol. This test measures the amount of lipoprotein (a) in your blood. If levels are high, it could signal that you're at risk for heart disease. 

6. Fibrinogen

Fibrinogen is a blood plasma protein that your liver produces. 

It plays a critical role in promoting your body to form normal blood clots so it can stop bleeding. A fibrinogen activity test is also called a Factor I assay, and it measures the level of this protein in your blood. 

If you have low fibrinogen levels, this can lead to thrombosis. Thrombosis is a blood clot that forms inside of your blood vessel, preventing your blood from flowing as it should throughout your circulatory system.

This can lead to many serious medical conditions, including heart attack and stroke.

7. Apolipoprotein B

Also called Apolipoprotein B or Apo B, Apolipoprotein B-100 is a protein associated with the metabolism of lipids.

It is also the main protein constituent of lipoproteins, including very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad cholesterol"). 

This test examines the amount of Apo B that your blood contains. 

8. Creatine Kinase (CK), Total

Creatine kinase (CK) is an enzyme present within your body. It's found in your heart, brain, skeletal muscle, and many other tissues.

If a muscle becomes weakened or compromised, your body will release excess levels of CK into your blood. A Creatine Kinase (CK), Total test is one way to detect an early heart attack. 

9. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel measures 20 biomarkers to provide a complete look into your metabolic functions. As a result, you're granted an inside look at some of your most critical levels, including your:

  • Glucose (blood sugar) levels
  • Electrolyte and fluid balance
  • Kidney function
  • Liver function

All of these contain elements that could impact your heart health, as they reveal key insights about your current condition. As such, your physician can use your panel results to monitor an ongoing condition, such as high blood pressure, or to diagnose a new condition, such as diabetes.

10. Hemoglobin A1c

Our Hemoglobin A1C test will reveal your average blood sugar levels over the past two to three months. This test is especially important for diabetic patients.

Why? 

Hemoglobin A1C levels are critical indicators of glycemic control. Combined with blood pressure and cholesterol measurements, they can indicate a patient's risk of complications, including CVD.

11. Glucose (Fasting)

Glucose (Fasting) test measures the amount of glucose in your blood. A kind of simple sugar, glucose is our body's primary source of energy.

This test is important because impaired glucose tolerance could signal an increased risk for diabetes and CVD. In addition, this test can help diagnose and treat carbohydrate metabolic disorders, including:

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Idiopathic hypoglycemia
  • Pancreatic islet cell neoplasm

Note that you'll need to abstain from eating or drinking for at least eight hours before you undergo this test.

12. Insulin

If your glucose test comes back low, you might consider an insulin test, as well.

If you're unable to produce enough insulin, or if your cells are resistant to its effects, glucose is unable to reach most of the cells in your body, causing them to starve.

This triggers your blood glucose in your blood to rise to an unhealthy level. In turn, this upsets your normal metabolic processes, resulting in various disorders and conditions, including:

  • Kidney disease
  • CVD
  • Vision problems 
  • Neurological problems

13. High-Sensitivity CRP

If you have inflammation in your body, your levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) will increase.

high-sensitivity CRP test can identify and isolate any instances of inflammation. You can use these results to evaluate your risk of developing coronary artery disease. This is a condition linked to inflammation that narrows the arteries of your heart, which can lead to a heart attack.

14. TSH

Standing for thyroid-stimulating hormone, TSH is a chemical that your anterior pituitary gland produces.

It stimulates your thyroid, which is a small butterfly-shaped gland located inside of your neck in front of your windpipe. To do so, it binds to your internal TSH receptor, releasing hormones known as thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) into your bloodstream.

Unusually large amounts of T4 and T3 can lead to an overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism). Symptoms of this condition include:

  • Rapid heart rate
  • Weight loss
  • Hand tremors
  • Nervousness
  • Irritated eyes
  • Difficulty sleeping

15. Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)

When you ingest certain nutrients, such as choline and L-carnitine, your gut bacteria then break them down, producing a compound called trimethylamine (TMA). From there, your liver converts TMA into a compound called trimethylene N-oxide (TMAO).

High levels of TMAO are associated with an increased risk of heart disease, notably those related to clotting events, such as heart attacks and strokes. This test measures the levels of TMAO in your blood.

16. NT-proBNP

Both B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-b-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) are peptides. 

On a normal basis, your heart produces small quantities of these peptides. However, it amplifies the amounts when it senses that it needs to work harder. An NT-proBNP test can help identify your risk of heart disease, including congestive heart failure (CHF).

17. Global Risk Score (GRS)

This is a tool that can help rate your individual risk of developing heart disease or of having a heart attack within a given timeframe, such as the next 10 years.

It can help you determine your absolute risk of having a coronary heart disease event (such as a myocardial infarction). Your GRS is based on an empiric equation that takes into account major risk factors, including your blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

18. Myeloperoxidase Antibody (MPO)

Myeloperoxidase Antibody (MPO) is an inflammatory enzyme derived from your white blood cells. It measures disease activity from the luminal aspect of your arterial wall.

When your artery wall is inflamed or damaged, MPO levels rise. Elevated levels can predict the risk of heart disease or future cardiovascular events. In fact, individuals with high MPO levels are more than two times as likely to experience cardiovascular mortality than those with normal levels.

19. Lp-PLA2

Also known as a PLAC test, this measures the amount of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase, or Lp-PLA2, present in your bloodstream.

This enzyme is associated with low-density lipoprotein or LDL. When LDL carries Lp-PLA2 to your coronary artery walls, it makes them inflamed. If there is any plaque present there, it's more prone to rupture. Thus, high levels of Lp-PLA2 can indicate an increased risk of a heart attack or stroke.

20. Vitamin D

Vitamin D and heart health go hand-in-hand.

If your levels of this essential nutrient are too low, it could signal that you're at risk of a cardiovascular event. In addition to the conditions associated with CVD, such as high blood pressure and diabetes, a deficiency can also lead to:

  • Heart attack
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Peripheral arterial disease
  • Stroke and the 

Vitamin D test can measure the level of this vitamin in your blood.

21. Troponin

Troponin T or troponin I proteins are present in your blood. They're released when the muscles in your heart become damaged, such as with a heart attack.

This test can measure the levels of these proteins in your blood. The more damage there is to your heart, the greater the amounts will be. This makes it a key way to determine if a heart attack has occurred.

22. Urine Albumin-Creatinine Ratio

Albumin is a major protein that's normally present in your blood. If your kidneys are functioning as they should, virtually no albumin should be present in your urine.

On the other hand, creatine is a byproduct of muscle metabolism that's released into your urine at a constant rate. By comparing the two via urine analysis, a Urine Albumin-Creatinine Ratio test helps to indicate how much albumin is being released into your urine. 

People with consistently detectable amounts of albumin in their urine have a condition known as albuminuria. This population has an increased risk of developing progressive kidney failure and cardiovascular disease in the future.

23. BNP

This is a blood test that measures the levels of a protein called B-Type Natriuretic Peptide, or BNP, that your heart and blood vessels produce.

If you have heart failure or are at risk of developing heart failure, your BPN levels will be higher than normal. 

24. APOE Genotyping

Apolipoprotein E (Apo E) is a protein that helps your body transport lipids (fats and cholesterol) in your blood.

The APOE genotyping test is used to evaluate your DNA to determine what APOE forms (called alleles) are present within it. For reference, APOE e3/e3 is the most common genotype and is considered "neutral."

On the other hand, APOE e4 is found in nearly a quarter of the population and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. This is a disease characterized by the deposition of fatty plaques on the inner walls of your arteries.

If this test finds these genotypes, it could signal that you're predisposed to a significantly elevated level of LDL-C (or "bad cholesterol") and triglycerides. This is especially the case if your diet is high in saturated fat.

25. Apolipoprotein A1

This test measures the level of apolipoprotein in your blood. 

Apolipoprotein A1 is a protein that's carried in HDL cholesterol or "good" cholesterol.

It helps initiate the process that enables HDL to remove bad types of cholesterol from your body. This means that apolipoprotein A can help lower your risk for CVD.

26. MTHFR Mutation

Standing for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase, the MTHFR gene includes the code required to produce the MTHFR enzyme. It plays a role in the process that converts homocysteine into methionine, which is an important building block for many proteins.

An MTHFR Mutation test is designed to detect two of the most common mutations in this gene. 

These MTHFR variants are called C677T and A1298C. Individuals can inherit one or both of them.

If these are present, they can change your DNA, decreasing MTHFR activity, and increasing homocysteine levels in your blood. This may increase your risk of premature CVD, as well as the formation of inappropriate blood clots (thrombosis), or stroke.

27. Cardiac Risk Assessment

This is a comprehensive group of health factors that can help determine your chance of having a cardiovascular event such as a stroke or heart attack.

Upon completion of this assessment, you should be able to rank your risk level as slight, moderate, or high. Overall, the most important blood test for cardiac risk assessment is your lipid profile.

Order These Critical Blood Tests Online

When it comes to your cardiovascular health, you can't afford to take any chances. You need access to a platform that allows you to order these important blood tests online at any time.

That's where we come in.

We offer a wide range of lab tests designed to help you gain clearer insights into everything from the condition of your heart to the vitamins in your diet.

If you need help understanding the health of your heart, we'd love to help. We offer these key cardiovascular lab tests as part of our selection of 2,000 lab tests, and we provide explanations for each biomarker.

To help you identify organize the lab tests that may be of value to you, we have links to four cardiovascular panels below. Each Heart Panel includes a group of tests to help you establish your baseline biomarkers and understand the health of your heart based on your health heart assessment.

CVD - 1. Low Heart Health Risk

CVD - 2. Moderate Heart Health Risk

CVD - 3. High Heart Health Risk

CVD - 4. High Heart Health Risk Plus

You can select your lab tests, order directly online, choose a convenient patient service center near you, and review your test results typically in 1 to 2 days after your blood is collected.

Take charge of your health and get tested today at ultalabtests.com.