Complete Blood Count (CBC) with Differential and Platelets Blood Test Most Popular

The Complete Blood Count (CBC) with Differential and Platelets Blood Test test contains 1 test with 33 biomarkers.

Brief Description: A Complete Blood Count (CBC) test, also known as a CBC test, is a common laboratory test that provides valuable insights into a patient's overall health and helps detect potential blood disorders or abnormalities. It examines the three major components of blood: red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets. By measuring various parameters related to these blood cells, the CBC test offers essential information for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

Also Known As: CBC test, Complete Blood Count Test, Total Blood Count Test, CBC with Differential and Platelets test, Hemogram test  

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Whole Blood 

Test Preparation: No preparation required 

When is a Complete Blood Count test ordered?  

A CBC test may be ordered in various situations. These include:

  1. Routine Check-ups: Doctors often include a CBC test as part of routine check-ups to assess overall health and screen for any underlying blood-related conditions.

  2. Evaluation of Symptoms: When a patient presents unexplained symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, frequent infections, bruising, or excessive bleeding, a CBC test can help identify potential causes or abnormalities.

  3. Monitoring Chronic Conditions: Patients with chronic conditions like anemia, infections, autoimmune disorders, or blood-related diseases require regular CBC tests to monitor their condition, track treatment effectiveness, and adjust therapies accordingly.

  4. Pre-Surgical Assessment: Prior to surgery or invasive medical procedures, doctors order CBC tests to evaluate a patient's blood cell counts and ensure their ability to handle the procedure safely.

What does a Complete Blood Count test check for? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that determines the number of cells in circulation. White blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), and platelets (PLTs) are three types of cells suspended in a fluid called plasma. They are largely created and matured in the bone marrow and are released into the bloodstream when needed under normal circumstances. 

A CBC is mainly performed with an automated machine that measures a variety of factors, including the number of cells present in a person's blood sample. The findings of a CBC can reveal not only the quantity of different cell types but also the physical properties of some of the cells. 

Significant differences in one or more blood cell populations may suggest the presence of one or more diseases. Other tests are frequently performed to assist in determining the reason for aberrant results. This frequently necessitates visual confirmation via a microscope examination of a blood smear. A skilled laboratory technician can assess the appearance and physical features of blood cells, such as size, shape, and color, and note any anomalies. Any extra information is taken note of and communicated to the healthcare provider. This information provides the health care provider with further information about the cause of abnormal CBC results. 

The CBC focuses on three different types of cells: 

WBCs (White Blood Cells) 

The body uses five different types of WBCs, also known as leukocytes, to keep itself healthy and battle infections and other types of harm. The five different leukocytes are eosinophiles, lymphocytes, neutrophiles, basophils, and monocytes. They are found in relatively steady numbers in the blood. Depending on what is going on in the body, these values may momentarily rise or fall. An infection, for example, can cause the body to manufacture more neutrophils in order to combat bacterial infection. The amount of eosinophils in the body may increase as a result of allergies. A viral infection may cause an increase in lymphocyte production. Abnormal (immature or mature) white cells multiply fast in certain illness situations, such as leukemia, raising the WBC count. 

RBCs (Red Blood Cells) 

The bone marrow produces red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes, which are transferred into the bloodstream after maturing. Hemoglobin, a protein that distributes oxygen throughout the body, is found in these cells. Because RBCs have a 120-day lifespan, the bone marrow must constantly manufacture new RBCs to replace those that have aged and disintegrated or have been lost due to hemorrhage. A variety of diseases, including those that cause severe bleeding, can alter the creation of new RBCs and their longevity. 

The CBC measures the number of RBCs and hemoglobin in the blood, as well as the proportion of RBCs in the blood (hematocrit), and if the RBC population appears to be normal. RBCs are generally homogeneous in size and shape, with only minor differences; however, considerable variances can arise in illnesses including vitamin B12 and folate inadequacy, iron deficiency, and a range of other ailments. Anemia occurs when the concentration of red blood cells and/or the amount of hemoglobin in the blood falls below normal, resulting in symptoms such as weariness and weakness. In a far smaller percentage of cases, there may be an excess of RBCs in the blood (erythrocytosis or polycythemia). This might obstruct the flow of blood through the tiny veins and arteries in extreme circumstances. 

Platelets 

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small cell fragments that aid in the regular clotting of blood. A person with insufficient platelets is more likely to experience excessive bleeding and bruises. Excess platelets can induce excessive clotting or excessive bleeding if the platelets are not operating properly. The platelet count and size are determined by the CBC. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Complete Blood Count test: 

  1. Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) or Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP):

    • Purpose: These panels measure glucose, calcium, and electrolytes (sodium, potassium, carbon dioxide, chloride), and kidney function (blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine). The CMP includes additional tests for liver function (ALP, ALT, AST, bilirubin).
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: These panels provide a general overview of a person's metabolism and organ function and can help determine the cause of symptoms like fatigue or weakness that might be related to abnormalities found on a CBC.
  2. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) and C-Reactive Protein (CRP):

    • Purpose: These are markers of inflammation in the body. They are not specific but can indicate the presence of an inflammatory process.
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: If a CBC shows abnormalities such as an elevated white blood cell count, these tests can help determine if inflammation or infection is present.
  3. Coagulation tests (Prothrombin Time (PT), International Normalized Ratio (INR), Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT)):

    • Purpose: These tests assess blood clotting function and are important if the platelet count or function is abnormal, or if there is a concern about bleeding or clotting disorders.
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: Abnormal platelet counts from a CBC could signal a bleeding or clotting disorder that would warrant these tests.
  4. Iron studies (Serum iron, Ferritin, Transferrin, Total Iron-Binding Capacity (TIBC)):

    • Purpose: These tests measure different aspects of the body's iron storage and transport and can help diagnose iron-deficiency anemia or hemochromatosis (iron overload).
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: If the CBC indicates anemia, particularly microcytic anemia (small red blood cells), iron studies can help determine if iron deficiency is the cause.
  5. Vitamin B12 and Folate levels:

    • Purpose: These vitamins are crucial for the production of red blood cells, and their deficiency can cause macrocytic anemia (large red blood cells).
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: If the CBC shows macrocytosis, measuring B12 and folate levels can help find the underlying issue.
  6. Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH):

    • Purpose: LDH is an enzyme found throughout the body, and high levels can indicate cell damage.
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: Elevated LDH may accompany certain types of hemolytic anemia or other conditions that cause a high turnover of cells, which could be suggested by a CBC.
  7. Reticulocyte Count:

    • Purpose: This test measures the number of young red blood cells in the blood, providing information about bone marrow function.
    • Why is it ordered with a CBC: A reticulocyte count can help determine if the bone marrow is responding appropriately to anemia by producing new red blood cells.

The specific tests ordered alongside a CBC with differential and platelets will depend on the clinical scenario, the initial CBC results, and the suspected or differential diagnoses that the healthcare provider is considering.

Conditions where a Complete Blood Count test is recommended: 

A CBC test can assist in diagnosing and monitoring various conditions or diseases, including:

  1. Anemia: CBC helps identify different types of anemia, such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin B12 deficiency anemia, or autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  2. Infections: An abnormal CBC count can indicate the presence of an infection, whether bacterial, viral, or fungal. It provides information about the severity and type of infection.

  3. Leukemia: CBC abnormalities may suggest the presence of certain blood cancers, including leukemia. Further tests are necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

  4. Inflammatory Disorders: Conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, or vasculitis can cause changes in the CBC results, indicating ongoing inflammation or autoimmune processes.

How does my healthcare provider use a Complete Blood Count test? 

Health care providers use the results of a CBC test to:

  1. Confirm Diagnoses: Abnormal CBC findings help in diagnosing specific conditions or diseases, such as anemia, infections, blood disorders, or certain cancers.

  2. Monitor Treatment Progress: Regular CBC tests allow doctors to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments or therapies and make necessary adjustments based on blood cell count improvements or changes.

  3. Guide Further Investigations: If CBC results indicate abnormalities, doctors may recommend additional specialized tests or refer the patient to a hematologist or other relevant specialists for further evaluation and diagnosis.

By understanding the purpose, significance, and applications of a CBC test, patients and healthcare providers can utilize this valuable diagnostic tool to aid in the management of various health conditions and ensure optimal patient care.

What do my Complete Blood Count results mean? 

A low Red Blood Cell Count, also known as anemia, could be due many different causes such as chronic bleeding, a bone marrow disorder, and nutritional deficiency just to name a few. A high Red Blood Cell Count, also known as polycythemia, could be due to several conditions including lung disease, dehydration, and smoking. Both Hemoglobin and Hematocrit tend to reflect Red Blood Cell Count results, so if your Red Blood Cell Count is low, your Hematocrit and Hemoglobin will likely also be low. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Differential results mean? 

A low White Blood Cell count or low WBC count, also known as leukopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders, including autoimmune issues, severe infection, and lymphoma. A high White Blood Cell count, or high WBC count, also known as leukocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders, including infection, leukemia, and inflammation. Abnormal levels in your White Blood Cell Count will be reflected in one or more of your different white blood cells. Knowing which white blood cell types are affected will help your healthcare provider narrow down the issue. Results should be discussed with your healthcare provider, who can provide an interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Platelet results mean? 

A low Platelet Count, also known as thrombocytopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders, including autoimmune issues, viral infection, and leukemia. A high Platelet Count, also known as Thrombocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders, including cancer, iron deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis. Results should be discussed with your healthcare provider, who can provide an interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

NOTE: Ulta Lab Tests provides CBC test results from Quest Diagnostics as they are reported. Often, different biomarker results are made available at different time intervals. When reporting the results, Ulta Lab Tests denotes those biomarkers not yet reported as 'pending' for every biomarker the test might report. Only biomarkers Quest Diagnostics observes are incorporated and represented in the final CBC test results provided by Ulta Lab Tests. 
NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported. Certain biomarkers do not appear in healthy individuals. 

Most Common Questions about the Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test:

Test Purpose and Frequency

What is the purpose of a Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test?

This test provides detailed information about the types and numbers of cells in the blood: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. It's often used as a broad screening test to evaluate your general health status, and can also be used to diagnose and monitor a variety of diseases and conditions.

How frequently should I get a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

The frequency of this test varies depending on various factors like your age, health history, and any ongoing treatments. If you're in good health, your doctor might recommend it as part of a routine physical examination. For those with a chronic condition, such as heart disease or kidney disease, your doctor may recommend frequent CBC tests to monitor your condition.

Components and Normal Ranges

What does a CBC with Differential and Platelets test measure?

This test measures several components: Red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), red cell distribution width (RDW), platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), white blood cell (WBC) count, and the proportions of different types of white blood cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, eosinophils, and basophils).

What is the normal range for each component of the Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test?

The normal ranges can vary slightly depending on the patient's gender and age, but in general, they are as follows:

  • Red blood cell count: Men, 4.2-5.8 million cells/uL; Women, 3.8-5.1 million cells/uL
  • Hemoglobin: Men, 13.2-17.1 g/dL; Women, 11.7-15.5 g/dL
  • Hematocrit: Men, 38.5%-50.0%; Women, 35.0%-45.0%
  • White blood cell count: 3,800 to 10,800 cells/uL
  • Platelet count: 140 to 400 thousand/uL

Understanding Test Results

What does a high white blood cell count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A high white blood cell count could suggest that your body is fighting an infection. It might also indicate an immune system disorder, inflammation, or leukemia. Certain drugs, like corticosteroids, can also cause an elevated white blood cell count.

What does a low white blood cell count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A low white blood cell count could suggest a bone marrow problem or that a disease or condition is damaging your immune system. It might be due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, certain diseases such as lupus or liver disease, or certain drugs that damage white blood cells.

What does a high red blood cell count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A high red blood cell count could indicate a condition such as polycythemia vera or heart disease. Dehydration, kidney disease, and living at a high altitude can also elevate your red blood cell count.

What does a low red blood cell count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A low red blood cell count indicates anemia, which can be caused by various conditions such as blood loss, iron deficiency, bone marrow problems, or kidney disease.

What does a high platelet count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A high platelet count can occur in response to an infection, inflammation, cancer, or a bone marrow condition. It can also occur after having your spleen removed.

What does a low platelet count mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A low platelet count can be due to a variety of causes such as an enlarged spleen, an autoimmune disease, a bone marrow disorder, or certain medications. It may also be a result of heavy alcohol use or vitamin B12 deficiency.

Interpretation of Differential Results

What does the 'differential' part of the Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test refer to?

The 'differential' refers to a detailed breakdown of the different types of white blood cells in your blood. It provides information on the percentage of each type relative to the total white blood cell count.

What can the differential reveal about my health in the CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

Changes in the number or percentage of different types of white blood cells can provide insights into various health conditions. An increase in neutrophils, for example, may indicate an acute infection, while an increase in lymphocytes may be seen in chronic infections or certain types of cancers.

Health Conditions and CBC

Can the CBC with Differential and Platelets test detect cancer?

While a CBC with differential cannot diagnose cancer on its own, it can provide clues that something is wrong, prompting further investigation. Certain types of cancers, such as leukemia or multiple myeloma, can cause significant changes in the blood cell counts.

Can a CBC with Differential and Platelets test indicate an infection?

Yes, a CBC with differential can often suggest an infection if there's an elevated white blood cell count, particularly neutrophils. However, the CBC cannot identify the specific type of infection (bacterial, viral, fungal), and further tests may be needed.

Can a CBC with Differential and Platelets test indicate if I have anemia?

Yes, a CBC can indicate anemia. If you have a low red blood cell count, low hemoglobin, or low hematocrit, you may have anemia. The MCV can provide additional information about the cause of the anemia.

Can a CBC with Differential and Platelets test detect autoimmune diseases?

The CBC with differential itself cannot diagnose an autoimmune disease, but it can provide important clues. For instance, certain autoimmune diseases may cause changes in white blood cell counts, such as an increase in the number of lymphocytes or a decrease in the number of neutrophils. Additionally, some autoimmune diseases like lupus or rheumatoid arthritis may lead to anemia, which would be indicated by low red blood cell counts or hemoglobin levels. However, diagnosing an autoimmune disease typically requires a combination of blood tests, including more specific antibody tests, along with clinical symptoms and other diagnostic criteria.

Interpretation of Other CBC Components

What does it mean if my MCV level is high in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

MCV stands for mean corpuscular volume and it measures the average size of your red blood cells. A high MCV indicates that your red blood cells are larger than normal, which can be caused by a vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, liver disease, or excessive alcohol use.

What does it mean if my MCV level is low in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A lowMCV indicates that your red blood cells are smaller than normal, a condition called microcytosis. This is often seen in conditions such as iron deficiency anemia or thalassemia.

What does a high RDW in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test mean?

RDW, or red cell distribution width, measures the variation in size and shape of your red blood cells. A high RDW means there is a large variation in size, which can be an early sign of conditions such as iron deficiency anemia, vitamin B12 deficiency, or folate deficiency.

What happens if my hemoglobin is low in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

Low hemoglobin levels indicate anemia, which can be caused by a variety of conditions including iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, blood loss, or a chronic disease. Symptoms can include fatigue, weakness, pale skin, and shortness of breath.

What happens if my hemoglobin is high in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

High hemoglobin could suggest polycythemia, a disorder in which your body makes too many red blood cells. This could be a response to chronically low oxygen levels in your blood due to lung disease, living at a high altitude, or it could be caused by a bone marrow disorder.

What does a high MPV mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

MPV stands for mean platelet volume. A high MPV value could suggest that your body is producing larger platelets, which might happen in certain types of anemia, in response to inflammation, or when your spleen isn’t working properly.

What does a low MPV mean in a CBC with Differential and Platelets test?

A low MPV value might occur when your body is producing smaller than normal platelets, which can be seen in conditions such as aplastic anemia or some inherited disorders.

Can a CBC with Differential and Platelets test indicate if I have a bleeding disorder?

While the CBC test cannot directly diagnose a bleeding disorder, it can provide useful information. For example, if your platelet count is low or if the platelets are not functioning properly, it could indicate a bleeding disorder. Further specific tests would be required to diagnose a bleeding disorder.

Can a CBC with Differential and Platelets test detect blood clotting disorders?

The CBC test is not designed to diagnose clotting disorders. However, it might provide some indications, like a high platelet count, that could suggest a clotting disorder. Additional specialized tests are typically needed to diagnose clotting disorders.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Reflex Information for the Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: CBC, CBC includes Differential and Platelets, CBC/PLT w/DIFF, Complete Blood Count (includes Differential and Platelets)

NOTE: Ulta Lab Tests provides CBC test results from Quest Diagnostics as they are reported. Often, different biomarker results are made available at different time intervals. When reporting the results, Ulta Lab Tests denotes those biomarkers not yet reported as 'pending' for every biomarker the test might report. Only biomarkers Quest Diagnostics observes are incorporated and represented in the final CBC test results provided by Ulta Lab Tests.

Absolute Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Absolute Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Absolute Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Absolute Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Absolute Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

Absolute Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Neutrophils

Neutrophils (neu) normally make up the largest number of circulating WBCs. They move into an area of damaged or infected tissue, where they engulf and destroy bacteria or sometimes fungi. Young neutrophils, recently released into circulation, are called bands.

Absolute Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Absolute Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Hematocrit

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

Hemoglobin

Serum hemoglobin is a blood test that measures the level of free hemoglobin in the liquid part of the blood (the serum). Free hemoglobin is the hemoglobin outside of the red blood cells. Most of the hemoglobin is found inside the red blood cells, not in the serum.

Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

MCH

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is a calculation of the average amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin inside a red blood cell.

MCHC

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average percentage of hemoglobin inside a red cell.

MCV

Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is a measurement of the average size of RBCs.

Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

MPV

Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) - When it indicates average size of platelets are small; older platelets are generally smaller than younger ones and a low MPV may mean that a condition is affecting the production of platelets by the bone marrow. When it indicates a high number of larger, younger platelets in the blood; this may be due to the bone marrow producing and releasing platelets rapidly into circulation.

Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Neutrophils

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed.

Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Platelet Count

A platelet count is a test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. Platelets help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells.

Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

RDW

Red cell distribution width (RDW), which may be included in a CBC, is a calculation of the variation in the size of RBCs.

Reactive Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Red Blood Cell Count

An RBC count is a blood test that tells how many red blood cells (RBCs) you have. RBCs contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. How much oxygen your body tissues get depends on how many RBCs you have and how well they work.

White Blood Cell Count

A WBC count is a test to measure the number of white blood cells (WBCs) in the blood. WBCs help fight infections. They are also called leukocytes. There are five major types of white blood cells: basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes (T cells and B cells), monocytes and neutrophils
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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