All Fitness and Performance

Fitness Testing and health information

Are you looking for a way to determine your current fitness status or improve your health?

Fitness lab tests will help you discover out where you are now in terms of your fitness level so you can move toward better health. Thanks to Ulta Lab Test, it's now simpler than ever to receive the information you need about your body and where it stands in terms of biological function. Most fitness tests have results available within 1 to 2 business days, so you won't have to wait weeks or months for them.

We provide various testing options to provide you with the knowledge and insight you need to make informed decisions about your health and wellness goals. You'll be able to see how healthy or unhealthy you are, which will allow us to create a personalized plan that works best for you based on your unique needs and goals. This information is essential because it can help you understand where you are right now to better prepare for tomorrow – whether that means working out more or eating healthier meals.

You'll learn how well your body is performing based on key biomarkers that signal general health and wellness with fitness and performance lab testing. We also provide a secure online portal via which you can see all of your data and follow changes in your biomarkers over time to improve your health. You may order your lab tests from the convenience of your own home, eliminating the need to visit a doctor. We take care of everything for you with this handy service, so all you have to do is have your specimen professionally collected by a phlebotomist at a nearby patient service center. There are no hidden costs, and this service is entirely confidential.

When it comes to an understanding exactly where you are in terms of general health, you deserve nothing less than the truth – especially if the results might significantly impact how long you live! That's why we take pleasure in providing reliable test results from Quest Diagnostics that show people like you where they stand on their own personal wellness path. Don't waste another day wondering whether something is amiss with your body; take action immediately and purchase the fitness test that is best for you from the list below.

Additional information about fitness and performance lab tests may be found in the following articles.


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This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


Excellent For:

  • Body Composition
  • Fat Burning
  • Overall Health
  • Weight Loss
  • Weight Management

The Blueprint Fitness - Metabolic Performance panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) 
  2. Carotene 
  3. Cholesterol 
  4. Cholesterol - High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Ratio 
  5. Cortisol 
  6. Estrogen 
  7. Fructosamine
  8. Glucose 
  9. Hemoglobin A1c 
  10. High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) 
  11. Insulin 
  12. Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) 
  13. Non-HDL Cholesterol 
  14. Sex hormone binding globulin
  15. Testosterone
  16. Testosterone.free
  17. Triglycerides 
  18. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D2
  19. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D3
  20. Vitamin D, 25-OH, TOTAL
  21. Vitamin E
     

This panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)
 

Excellent For:

  • Active Lifestyle
  • Body Composition
  • Diet
  • Endurance Training
  • Fueling
  • Muscle Building
  • Overall Health
  • Strength Training
  • Weight Loss

Blueprint Fitness - Nutrition panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
  2. Albumin 
  3. Albumin-Globulin Ratio 
  4. Alkaline Phosphatase 
  5. Arachidonic Acid (AA) 
  6. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) 
  7. Bilirubin 
  8. BUN - Creatinine Ratio 
  9. Calcium 
  10. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 
  11. Carotene 
  12. Chloride 
  13. Cholesterol 
  14. Cholesterol - High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Ratio 
  15. Creatinine 
  16. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) 
  17. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) 
  18. EPA - Arachidonic Acid Ratio 
  19. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) 
  20. Ferritin 
  21. Folate (Folic Acid) 
  22. Fructosamine
  23. Globulin 
  24. Glucose 
  25. Hemoglobin A1c 
  26. High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) 
  27. Iron 
  28. Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) 
  29. Mercury 
  30. Non-HDL Cholesterol 
  31. Omega-3 
  32. Omega-6 
  33. Percent (%) Saturation 
  34. Potassium 
  35. Protein 
  36. Sodium 
  37. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) 
  38. Triglycerides 
  39. Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 
  40. Vitamin B12 
  41. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D2
  42. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D3
  43. Vitamin D, 25-OH, TOTAL
  44. Vitamin E

 

his panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)
 

Excellent For:

  • Anabolic Optimization
  • Endurance Training
  • Functional Fitness
  • Recovery
  • Strength Training

The Blueprint Fitness  - Training Status panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) 
  2. Cortisol 
  3. Creatine Kinase (CK) 
  4. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) 
  5. Iron 
  6. Percent (%) Saturation 
  7. Sex hormone binding globulin
  8. Testosterone
  9. Testosterone - Cortisol (T-C) Ratio 
  10. Testosterone.free
  11. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) 
  12. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  13. Transferrin 

This panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)
 

Blueprint Fitness - 2 Baseline-Nutrition-Hormones panel combines three Blueprint Fitness panels ( Baseline Insights, Training Status, Nutrition, and Hormones). 

Excellent For:

  • Active Lifestyle
  • Aerobic Optimization
  • Anabolic Optimization
  • Body Composition
  • Conditioning
  • Diet
  • Endurance
  • Endurance Training
  • Fueling
  • Muscle Building
  • Overall Health
  • Performance
  • Strength Training
  • Weight Loss
  • Weight Management

Blueprint Fitness - 2 Baseline-Nutrition-Hormones panel combines three Blueprint Fitness panels ( Baseline Insights, Training Status, Nutrition, and Hormones). 

This panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
  2. Albumin 
  3. Albumin-Globulin Ratio 
  4. Alkaline Phosphatase 
  5. Arachidonic Acid (AA) 
  6. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) 
  7. Basophils 
  8. Bilirubin 
  9. BUN - Creatinine Ratio 
  10. Calcium 
  11. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 
  12. Carotene 
  13. Chloride 
  14. Cholesterol 
  15. Cholesterol - High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Ratio 
  16. Corpuscular Volume (MCV) 
  17. Cortisol 
  18. Creatinine 
  19. Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) 
  20. Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) 
  21. Eosinophils 
  22. EPA - Arachidonic Acid Ratio 
  23. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) 
  24. Estradiol
  25. Ferritin 
  26. Folate (Folic Acid) 
  27. Fructosamine
  28. Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) 
  29. Globulin 
  30. Glucose 
  31. Hematocrit 
  32. Hemoglobin (HGB) 
  33. Hemoglobin A1c 
  34. High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) 
  35. Iron 
  36. Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) 
  37. Lymphocytes 
  38. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) 
  39. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) 
  40. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) 
  41. Mercury 
  42. Monocytes 
  43. Neutrophils 
  44. Non-HDL Cholesterol 
  45. Omega-3 
  46. Omega-6 
  47. Percent (%) Saturation 
  48. Platelet Count (PLT) 
  49. Potassium 
  50. Progesterone 
  51. Protein 
  52. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) 
  53. Red Blood Cells 
  54. Sex hormone binding globulin
  55. Sodium 
  56. Testosterone
  57. Testosterone.free
  58. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) 
  59. Triglycerides 
  60. Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 
  61. Uric Acid
  62. Vitamin B12 
  63. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D2
  64. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D3
  65. Vitamin D, 25-OH, TOTAL
  66. Vitamin E
  67. White Blood Cells

This panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)

 


Blueprint Fitness - Endurance-Metabolic-Training 3  panel combines three Blueprint Fitness panels ( Metabolic Performance, Training Status, and Endurance & Conditioning)

Excellent For:

  • Aerobic Optimization
  • Altitude Training
  • Anabolic Optimization
  • Body Composition
  • Cardiovascular Health
  • Conditioning
  • Distance Training
  • Endurance Training
  • Fat Burning
  • Functional Fitness
  • Hydration
  • Overall Health
  • Recovery
  • Speed Training
  • Strength Training
  • Weight Loss
  • Weight Management

Blueprint Fitness - Endurance-Metabolic-Training 3  panel combines three Blueprint Fitness panels ( Metabolic Performance, Training Status, and Endurance & Conditioning) This panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
  2. Albumin 
  3. Albumin-Globulin Ratio 
  4. Alkaline Phosphatase 
  5. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) 
  6. Basophils 
  7. Bilirubin 
  8. BUN - Creatinine Ratio 
  9. C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) 
  10. Calcium 
  11. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 
  12. Carotene 
  13. Chloride 
  14. Cholesterol 
  15. Cholesterol - High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Ratio 
  16. Corpuscular Volume (MCV) 
  17. Cortisol 
  18. Creatine Kinase (CK) 
  19. Creatinine 
  20. Eosinophils 
  21. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) 
  22. Estrogen 
  23. Ferritin 
  24. Folate (Folic Acid) 
  25. Fructosamine
  26. Globulin 
  27. Glucose 
  28. Glucose 
  29. Hematocrit 
  30. Hemoglobin (HGB) 
  31. Hemoglobin A1c 
  32. High-Density Lipoprotein (HDL) 
  33. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) 
  34. Insulin 
  35. Iron 
  36. Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) 
  37. Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) 
  38. Lymphocytes 
  39. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) 
  40. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) 
  41. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) 
  42. Monocytes 
  43. Neutrophils 
  44. Non-HDL Cholesterol 
  45. Percent (%) Saturation 
  46. Platelet Count (PLT) 
  47. Potassium 
  48. Protein 
  49. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) 
  50. Red Blood Cells 
  51. Sex hormone binding globulin
  52. Sodium 
  53. Testosterone
  54. Testosterone.free
  55. Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) 
  56. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  57. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) 
  58. Transferrin 
  59. Triglycerides 
  60. Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 
  61. Vitamin B12 
  62. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D2
  63. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D3
  64. Vitamin D, 25-OH, TOTAL
  65. Vitamin E
  66. White Blood Cells 

This panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)

 

 

 

Excellent For:

  • Active Lifestyle
  • Conditioning
  • Endurance
  • Overall Health
  • Performance
  • Strength Training
  • Weight Loss

The Blueprint Fitness - Baseline Insights Panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
  2. Albumin 
  3. Albumin - Globulin Ratio 
  4. Alkaline Phosphatase 
  5. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) 
  6. Basophils 
  7. Bilirubin 
  8. BUN - Creatinine Ratio 
  9. Calcium 
  10. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 
  11. Chloride 
  12. Cholesterol 
  13. Cholesterol - High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Ratio 
  14. Corpuscular Volume (MCV) 
  15. Cortisol 
  16. Creatinine 
  17. Eosinophils 
  18. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) 
  19. Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) 
  20. Globulin 
  21. Glucose 
  22. Hematocrit 
  23. Hemoglobin (HGB) 
  24. Hemoglobin A1c 
  25. High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) 
  26. Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) 
  27. Lymphocytes 
  28. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) 
  29. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) 
  30. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) 
  31. Monocytes 
  32. Neutrophils 
  33. Non-HDL Cholesterol 
  34. Platelet Count (PLT) 
  35. Potassium 
  36. Protein 
  37. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) 
  38. Red Blood Cells 
  39. Sodium 
  40. Triglycerides 
  41. Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 
  42. Uric Acid
  43. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D2
  44. Vitamin D, 25-OH, D3
  45. Vitamin D, 25-OH, TOTAL
  46. White Blood Cells 

This panel also provides the 10-year and lifetime risk of ASCVD events and the 8-year risk of developing diabetes. The lipid panel results will aid in the assessment of ASCVD. Assessment of 10-year risk of a first atherosclerotic cardiovascular (ASCVD) event is recommended by the 2013 ACC/AHA Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults. These guidelines recommend initiating statin therapy based on 10-year ASCVD risk score. Assessment of 8-year risk of developing diabetes mellitus is based on laboratory test results with anthropomorphic data and family history. This algorithm was developed in the Framingham cohort, and is intended to aid in the identification of patients at risk for developing diabetes, permitting pharmacological or lifestyle interventions.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)
 

Excellent For:

  • Aerobic Optimization
  • Altitude Training
  • Cardiovascular Health
  • Conditioning
  • Distance Training
  • Endurance Training
  • Hydration
  • Speed Training

Blueprint Fitness - Endurance & Conditioning panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Alanine Aminotransferase (ALT) 
  2. Albumin 
  3. Albumin-Globulin Ratio 
  4. Alkaline Phosphatase 
  5. Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST) 
  6. Basophils 
  7. Bilirubin 
  8. BUN - Creatinine Ratio 
  9. Calcium 
  10. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) 
  11. Chloride 
  12. Corpuscular Volume (MCV) 
  13. Creatinine 
  14. Eosinophils 
  15. Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) 
  16. Ferritin 
  17. Folate (Folic Acid) 
  18. Globulin 
  19. Glucose 
  20. Hematocrit 
  21. Hemoglobin (HGB) 
  22. Iron 
  23. Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) 
  24. Lymphocytes 
  25. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin (MCH) 
  26. Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) 
  27. Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) 
  28. Monocytes 
  29. Neutrophils 
  30. Percent (%) Saturation 
  31. Platelet Count (PLT) 
  32. Potassium 
  33. Protein 
  34. Red Blood Cell Distribution Width (RDW) 
  35. Red Blood Cells 
  36. Sodium 
  37. Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) 
  38. Transferrin 
  39. Urea Nitrogen (BUN) 
  40. Vitamin B12 
  41. White Blood Cells 

 

 

Excellent For:

  • Aerobic Optimization
  • Anabolic Optimization
  • Body Composition
  • Endurance Training
  • Muscle Building
  • Overall Health
  • Strength Training

Weight Management

Blueprint Fitness - Hormones panel contains the following biomarkers.

  1. Cortisol 
  2. Estradiol
  3. Progesterone 
  4. Sex hormone binding globulin
  5. Testosterone
  6. Testosterone - Cortisol (T-C) Ratio 
  7. Testosterone.free
 




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Aids in the diagnosis of primary disease of skeletal muscle myocardial infarction and viral hepatitis.

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Description: Amylase is a blood test that is used to measure the amount of amylase in the blood’s serum. It is used to assess for and detect a pancreatic disorder.

Also Known As: Amy Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Amylase test ordered?

When a person displays symptoms of a pancreatic disease, a blood amylase test may be conducted.

  • Abdominal or back pain that is severe
  • Fever
  • Appetite loss.
  • Nausea

A urine amylase test may be requested in conjunction with or after a blood amylase test. A health practitioner may conduct one or both of these tests on a regular basis to evaluate the success of treatment and see whether amylase levels are increasing or decreasing over time.

What does an Amylase blood test check for?

Amylase is one of numerous pancreatic enzymes that aid in carbohydrate digestion. This test detects the presence of amylase in the blood.

Amylase is produced from the pancreas into the duodenum, the first region of the small intestine, where it aids in the digestion of carbohydrates. Other organs, including the salivary glands, generate it as well.

Amylase is normally found in modest amounts in the blood and urine. Increased levels of amylase are released into the blood when pancreatic cells are harmed, as in pancreatitis, or when the pancreatic duct is obstructed by a gallstone or, in rare situations, a pancreatic tumor. This raises amylase levels in the blood.

Lab tests often ordered with an Amylase test:

  • Lipase
  • Trypsin
  • Trypsinogen

Conditions where an Amylase test is recommended:

  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Pancreatic Diseases
  • Pancreatitis

How does my health care provider use an Amylase test?

An amylase test is used to identify and track acute pancreatitis. It's frequently ordered in conjunction with a lipase test. It can also be used to detect and track chronic pancreatitis and other pancreas-related conditions.

A urine amylase test may be requested as well. Its level will usually correspond to blood amylase concentrations, but the rise and decrease will occur later. A urine creatinine clearance test may be ordered in conjunction with a urine amylase test to determine the ratio of amylase to creatinine filtered by the kidneys. Because poor kidney function might result in a decreased rate of amylase clearance, this ratio is used to assess renal function.

An amylase test on peritoneal fluid may be used to assist diagnose pancreatitis in some instances, such as when there is a buildup of fluid in the abdomen.

Amylase tests are often used to track the progress of pancreatic cancer treatment and after gallstone resection that has resulted in gallbladder attacks.

What do my Amylase test results mean?

A high level of amylase in the blood may suggest the presence of a pancreas problem.

Amylase levels in the blood often rise to 4 to 6 times higher than the highest reference value, also known as the upper limit of normal, in acute pancreatitis. The increase happens within 4 to 8 hours following a pancreas damage and usually lasts until the cause is effectively treated. In a few days, the amylase levels will return to normal.

Amylase levels in chronic pancreatitis are initially fairly increased, although they frequently decline over time as the pancreas deteriorates. Returning to normal levels may not signal that the source of damage has been rectified in this scenario. The size of the amylase rise does not indicate the severity of pancreatic illness.

Amylase levels may also be elevated in persons who have pancreatic duct obstruction or pancreatic cancer.

Urine amylase levels rise in lockstep with blood amylase levels and remain elevated for several days after blood levels have returned to normal.

A high amount of amylase in the peritoneal fluid can indicate acute pancreatitis, but it can also indicate other abdominal problems including a clogged intestine or poor blood supply to the intestines.

A low amylase level in the blood and urine of a person with pancreatitis symptoms could indicate that the amylase-producing cells in the pancreas have been permanently damaged. Reduced levels can also be caused by renal illness or pregnancy toxemia.

Increased blood amylase levels along with normal to low urine amylase levels could indicate the presence of a macroamylase, a harmless compound of amylase and other proteins that builds up in the bloodstream.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Apo A1 and B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein A1 and Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum along with the ratio between B/A1. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk. Low levels of APO A1 are associated with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and are said to predict CAD better then triglycerides and HDL does.

Also Known As: Apo A1 and B Test, Apo A1 Test, Apo B Test, APOAB Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test, Apolipoprotein Evaluation Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting for 12 hours is required.

When are Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo A-I is a protein that plays a key function in lipid metabolism and is the most abundant protein in HDL, or "good cholesterol." Excess cholesterol in cells is removed by HDL, which transports it to the liver for recycling or elimination. Apo A-I levels tend to rise and fall with HDL levels, and apo A-I deficits are linked to an increased risk of CVD.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does Apolipoprotein A1 and B blood tests check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab or taxi. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Sticking with the taxi analogy, the driver is Apolipoprotein A. It permits HDL to be detected and bound by receptors in the liver at the end of the transport by activating the enzymes that load cholesterol from the tissues into HDL. Apolipoprotein A is divided into two types: apo A-I and apo A-II. Apo A-I has a higher prevalence than apo A-II. Apo A-I concentrations can be evaluated directly, and they tend to rise and fall in tandem with HDL levels. Deficiencies in apo A-I are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests:

  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests are recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

An apo A-I test may be ordered in the following situations:

Assist in the diagnosis of apo A-I deficiency caused by genetic or acquired diseases.

Assist those with a personal or family history of heart disease, high cholesterol, or triglycerides in their blood.

Keep track of how well lifestyle changes and lipid therapies are working.

An apo A-I test can be ordered in conjunction with an apo B test to determine the apo B/apo A-I ratio. This ratio is occasionally used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio to assess the risk of developing CVD.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein A1 and B test results mean?

Low apo A-I levels are linked to low HDL levels and slowed elimination of excess cholesterol from the body. Low levels of apo A-I, as well as high levels of apo B, are linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Deficiencies in apo A-I are caused by a number of hereditary diseases. Abnormal lipid levels, notably excessive amounts of low-density lipoprotein, are common in people with certain illnesses. They frequently have a higher rate of atherosclerosis. Low apo A-I levels are caused by several genetic diseases.

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Measurement of the levels of bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

Description: The CRP test is used to identify and/or monitor inflammation in patients.

Also Known As: CRP Test, Inflammation test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a C-Reactive Protein test ordered?

When a person's medical history and signs and symptoms indicate that they may have a significant bacterial infection, a CRP test may be recommended. When a newborn displays signs of infection or when a person has sepsis symptoms including fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate, it may be ordered.

It's also commonly requested on a regular basis to check illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and it's routinely repeated to see if medication is working. This is especially effective for inflammation issues because CRP levels decrease as inflammation decreases.

What does a C-Reactive Protein blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. After trauma or a heart attack, with active or uncontrolled autoimmune illnesses, and with acute bacterial infections like sepsis, markedly higher levels are reported. CRP levels can rise by a thousand-fold in response to inflammatory diseases, and their elevation in the blood can occur before pain, fever, or other clinical signs. The test detects inflammation caused by acute situations or monitors disease activity in chronic diseases by measuring the level of CRP in the blood.

The CRP test is not a diagnostic tool, although it can tell a doctor if inflammation is occurring. This information can be combined with other indicators like signs and symptoms, a physical exam, and other tests to establish whether someone has an acute inflammatory disorder or is having a flare-up of a chronic inflammatory disease. The health care provider may next do additional tests and treatment.

This CRP test should not be confused with the hs-CRP test. These are two separate CRP tests, each of which measures a different range of CRP levels in the blood for different purposes.

Lab tests often ordered with a C-Reactive Protein test:

  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • Procalcitonin
  • ANA
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • Complement

Conditions where a C-Reactive Protein test is recommended:

  • Arthritis
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Sepsis
  • Vasculitis
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Meningitis and Encephalitis

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a C-Reactive Protein test?

A health practitioner uses the C-reactive protein test to diagnose inflammation. CRP is an acute phase reactant, a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. The CRP test is not a diagnostic test for any ailment, but it can be used in conjunction with other tests to determine whether a person has an acute or chronic inflammatory disorder.

CRP, for example, can be used to detect or track substantial inflammation in someone who is suspected of having an acute ailment like:

  • Sepsis is a dangerous bacterial infection.
  • An infection caused by a fungus
  • Inflammation of the pelvis

People with chronic inflammatory diseases can use the CRP test to detect flare-ups and/or see if their medication is working. Here are a few examples:

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Arthritis, which can take many forms.
  • Autoimmune disorders, examples include lupus and vasculitis

CRP is occasionally requested in conjunction with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, another inflammatory test. While the CRP test is not specific enough to diagnose an illness, it does serve as a broad marker for infection and inflammation, alerting doctors to the need for more testing and treatment. A variety of additional tests may be used to determine the source of inflammation, depending on the probable cause.

What do my C-Reactive Protein test results mean?

CRP levels in the blood are usually low.

CRP levels in the blood that are high or rising indicate the existence of inflammation, but they don't tell you where it is or what's causing it. A high CRP level can establish the presence of a severe bacterial infection in people who are suspected of having one. High levels of CRP in persons with chronic inflammatory disorders indicate a flare-up or that treatment isn't working.

When the CRP level rises and then falls, it indicates that the inflammation or infection is diminishing and/or responding to treatment.

Is there anything else I should know about C-Reactive Protein?

CRP levels can rise during pregnancy, as well as with the use of birth control tablets or hormone replacement therapy. Obese people have also been found to have higher CRP levels.

In the presence of inflammation, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test will also rise; however, CRP rises first and then falls faster than the ESR.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A hs-CRP or High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein test is a blood test used to accurately detect lower concentrations of the protein C-Reactive Protein. This test is used to evaluate your risk of cardiovascular and heart disease and to check for inflammation and many other issues.

Also Known As: hsCRP Test, Cardiac CRP Test, high sensitivity C-reactive protein Test, CRP Test for heart disease.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a hs-CRP test ordered?

There is currently no consensus on when to get an hs-CRP test. It may be beneficial for treatment purposes to order hs-CRP for those that have kidney disease, diabetes or inflammatory disorders.

It's possible that hs-CRP will be tested again to confirm that a person has persistently low levels of inflammation.

What does a hs-CRP blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein found in the blood that rises in response to infection and inflammation, as well as after trauma, surgery, or a heart attack. As a result, it's one of numerous proteins referred to as acute phase reactants. The high-sensitivity CRP test detects low levels of inflammation in the blood, which are linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

According to the American Heart Association, CVD kills more people in the United States each year than any other cause. A number of risk factors have been related to the development of CVD, including family history, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, being overweight or diabetic, however a considerable number of people with few or no recognized risk factors will also acquire CVD. This has prompted researchers to investigate for new risk variables that could be causing CVD or could be used to identify lifestyle modifications and/or treatments that could lower a person's risk.

High-sensitivity CRP is one of an increasing number of cardiac risk markers that may be used to assess an individual's risk. According to certain research, monitoring CRP with a highly sensitive assay can assist identify the risk level for CVD in persons who appear to be healthy. CRP levels at the higher end of the reference range can be measured with this more sensitive test. Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, these normal but slightly elevated levels of CRP in otherwise healthy persons might indicate the future risk of a heart attack, sudden cardiac death, stroke, and peripheral artery disease.

Lab tests often ordered with a hs-CRP test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Lipid Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lp-Pla2
  • Glucose

Conditions where a hs-CRP test is recommended:

  • Heart Attack
  • Heart Disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Stroke

How does my health care provider use a hs-CRP test?

A test for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein can be used to assess a person's risk of cardiovascular disease. It can be used in conjunction with a lipid profile or other cardiac risk markers, such as the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 test, to provide further information regarding the risk of heart disease.

CRP is a protein that rises in the bloodstream as a result of inflammation. A continuous low level of inflammation, according to studies, plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, the narrowing of blood vessels caused by the build-up of cholesterol and other lipids, which is typically linked to CVD. The hs-CRP test successfully detects low levels of C-reactive protein, indicating low but chronic inflammation, and so aids in predicting a person's risk of developing CVD.

Some specialists believe that high-sensitivity CRP is a good test for assessing CVD, heart attacks, and stroke risk, and that it can help in the evaluation process before a person gets one of these health problems. Some experts believe that combining a good marker for inflammation, such as hs-CRP, with a lipid profile is the best way to predict risk. This test has been recommended by several organizations for persons who are at a moderate risk of having a heart attack in the following ten years.

What does my hs-CRP test result mean?

Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, high levels of hs-CRP in otherwise healthy people have been found to predict an elevated risk of future heart attacks, strokes, sudden cardiac death, and/or peripheral arterial disease.

Higher hs-CRP concentrations indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, while lower values indicate a lower risk. Individuals with hs-CRP values at the high end of the normal range are 1.5 to 4 times more likely than those with low levels of hs-CRP to have a heart attack.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.



Based on modern research, about 53% of American adults get their daily aerobic activity. At the same time, 23% hit the necessary muscle-strengthening activity needed to build muscle. 

This is why self-assessment is not enough to test for your physical fitness. 

You will want to set fitness goals and then hit them. This can only be done when you have accurate data in hand about your fitness status. You will want to go through the necessary lab tests and determine what is ideal for your health. 

Here is more on what you can get with the right physical fitness lab tests as you hope to hit your peak. 

What Is a Stamina, Health Fitness, and Performance Level?

Because the human body is complicated, there are several variables to test your fitness level. This also includes your cardiovascular health, muscular strength, and overall endurance. You will want to account for all of these factors. 

It is not easy to progress until you have the data in front of you. This is the best way to reach the right strategy as you build your stamina and strength. 

How Do Lab Tests Help Analyze and Better Your Stamina, Fitness, And Performance?  

For the most part, you are going to be working hard, and that will be seen when it comes to your physical fitness. Lab tests are a way to give yourself an edge as you learn more about your body. You will want to analyze this data and then improve your fitness. 

Stamina lab tests are good to see where you can make changes to your routine. This can include recovery times and how to optimize your sessions in the gym. You will want to take these tests regularly to remain on top of things. 

Signs of Internal Stamina, Fitness, and Performance  

Your internal fitness can be assessed by looking for specific signs. These can include your body fat and resting heart rate. 

You will want to complete the physical tests to remain on top of things when it comes to your overall performance. This can even include things such as recording the number of push-ups you can do in one go. 

You will want to keep track of these factors to test your fitness levels. This is what the pros do with the help of lab tests. 

Using Lab Tests for Stamina, Fitness, and Performance Measurements 

Lab tests are often not associated with factors such as stamina and fitness, but they do play a role. These tests can include a myriad of things and can pinpoint specific health conditions as necessary. This is a great tool for medical providers wanting to get as much information as possible in one place. It will help figure out whether or not there are deficiencies to keep note of. 

A good option that medical providers often use includes a complete blood count (CBC) test. This takes a look at the body's platelets, white blood cells, and red blood cells. It's a good way to see how oxygen is flowing through the body. 

It is also common to have a comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) done to assess the blood. This lab test focuses on looking at your metabolism. A lipid panel can also be set up to assess your cholesterol levels. 

What about those who want to build muscle? You will want to start with your folate levels, as this can dig deeper into how well your body repairs muscles. It is also smart to look at your magnesium levels to see how the body's muscle function holds up. 

Lab tests are great when it comes to testing the growth hormone in your blood. You will want to remain ahead of any deficiencies that are present in your body. 

You can also look at your homocysteine levels as a way to test your cardiovascular health. 

It is common for people to have fitness lab tests done with the help of these basic tests. You can also start recording training sessions as a way to learn more about your fitness levels. 

Here are some fitness panels offered by Ulta Lab Tests: 

  • Fitness Basic - Runs tests focused on core biomarkers for blood health, metabolic health, and cholesterol  
  • Fitness Basic Plus - Runs tests focused on the core biomarkers and adds aldolase results to test for cardiovascular health. 
  • Fitness Advanced - This includes 16 tests, 80 biomarkers, and more for athletes. 
  • Fitness Comprehensive - This option looks at everything a professional athlete would need to test their health. This includes 25 tests and up to 116 biomarkers. 
  • Performance Basic - This focuses on performance with a basic set of five tests with 66 biomarkers. 
  • Performance Basic Plus - This test focuses on everything in the basic package, along with 105 biomarkers. 
  • Performance Advanced - This focuses on looking deeper into your performance with 20 tests and 112 biomarkers. 
  • Performance Comprehensive - This looks at everything that can be tested for performance. This includes 40 tests and 142 biomarkers at once. This is ideal for improving your performance. 

Using Lab Tests to Assess, Diagnose, And Track Fitness, Performance, and Stamina 

With the help of Ulta Lab Tests, it's possible to keep track of your stamina and fitness levels. If you are a beginner, this is a good base to start with. You will learn about key biomarkers that set the tone for your progress moving forward. 

If you are a professional, it's best to lean towards a comprehensive performance panel. This will look at 143 biomarkers at once. 

A more casual athlete can go with other levels based on what they want. It doesn't take long to set up and get back. 

FAQs 

How Is Stamina Improved? 

You will want to begin with a simple complete blood count (CBC) to set a baseline. This will let you know how well the body is moving oxygen inside. This can help get a read on your existing stamina as that will help with your aerobic exercise. 

How Do You Monitor Physical Performance? 

It is important to keep track of each detail, including your weight, heart rate, and overall performance. These lab tests will help verify the information you are processing in real-time. 

How Long Does a Physical Lab Test Last? 

A lab test such as this should not take a long time. It will start as soon as you make a choice and get the bloodwork done. At this point, you should get the results back within a few business days. 

Which Fitness Lab Test Is Right for Me? 

You should take a look at what each fitness and performance test has to offer. This should be dictated by how far you are in your fitness journey and what type of data is already in hand. It is always smart to keep track of similar data points, ensuring you can compare lab tests. 

Choose The Right Fitness Lab Test 

When it comes to fitness lab tests, you can easily turn into a pro. You will fine-tune everything for your body's needs making it easier to put in the hard work. This is what a good lab test can do for you as you become fitter. 

Do not lean on health insurance or a doctor's referral. You need to choose the right test and go from there as a way to improve your fitness. Look at our blood test options and take control of your health. 

Order your fitness lab tests with Ulta Lab Tests

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable so you can make informed decisions during your fitness journey. Here’s some of the great benefits of using Ulta Lab Tests:

  • No insurance needed
  • No doctor’s referral required
  • Secure and confidential results
  • Affordable pricing on all tests
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee

Take the next step towards your fitness goals with Ulta Lab Tests.