All Blood Disorder Tests

Blood Disorder Lab Tests and health information

Be proactive in your health with Ulta Lab Tests to regularly test your blood for common blood disorders. Early detection is crucial for future care and treatment. 

  • Red blood cell disorders: iron deficiency anemia, vitamin deficiency anemia, and aplastic anemia
  • White blood cell disorders: leukemia, lymphoma, and myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Platelet disorders: hemophilia, Von Willebrand disease, Bernard Soulier syndrome


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Dr. Weatherby’s Standard Panel - "Blood Chemistry Analysis Standard Panel" contains the following 34 tests – Bilirubin, Fractionated; CBC (includes Differential and Platelets); Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); Creatinine; DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay; Estradiol; Ferritin; Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss; Folate, Serum; Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT); Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C); Homocysteine; hs-CRP; Insulin; Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC); Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD); Lipid Panel With Ratios; Magnesium; Phosphate (as Phosphorus); Progesterone, Immunoassay; Protein, Total and Protein Electrophoresis, with Scan and PSA Total.


This panel contains both Cortisol, A.M. #4212 and Cortisol, P.M. #4213, which will require the patient to visit the patient service center twice in one day.

  • First visit between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m. to have Cortisol, A.M. #4212 drawn along with most of the panel
  • Second visit between 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. to have Cortisol, P.M. #4213 drawn.

Dr. Weatherby’s Comprehensive Panel - "Blood Chemistry Analysis Comprehensive Panel" contains the following 45 tests - Bilirubin, Direct; Bilirubin, Fractionated; C-Peptide; C-Reactive Protein (CRP); CBC (includes Differential and Platelets); Collagen Cross-Linked N-Telopeptide (NTx), 24-Hour Urine; Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); Cortisol, A.M.; Cortisol, P.M.; Creatine Kinase (CK), Total; Creatinine; Creatinine Clearance; DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay; Estradiol; Ferritin; Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss; Folate, Serum; Fructosamine; Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT); Gastrin; Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C); Homocysteine; hs-CRP; Insulin; Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC); Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD); Lipid Panel With Ratios; Magnesium; Phosphate (as Phosphorus); Progesterone, Immunoassay; Protein, Total and Protein Electrophoresis, with Scan; PSA Total; QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS; Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG); T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS; T3 Total; T3, Free; T4, Free; Testosterone, Free, Bioavailable and Total, LC/MS/MS; Thyroid Panel; Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies; TSH; Uric Acid; Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin); and VLDL Cholesterol.


Description: ABO Group is a blood test that is used to determine what your blood type is.

Also Known As: Blood group test, blood type test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Whole Blood

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is ABO Group test ordered?

All donated blood undergoes ABO grouping and Rh typing. They're also used when someone needs a blood transfusion. The following conditions or circumstances may necessitate a transfusion:

  • Anemia that is severe, as well as anemia-causing illnesses such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia
  • During or after surgery when you have bleeding
  • Trauma or injury
  • Excessive blood loss 
  • Chemotherapy and  cancer
  • Hemophilia and similar bleeding disorders

When a woman becomes pregnant, she is tested to see if she is Rh negative or positive. Soon after birth, all newborn babies of Rh-negative mothers are tested for ABO and Rh to see if the mother need Rh immune globulin.

When an individual becomes a candidate to receive an organ, tissue, or bone marrow transplant, or when a person decides to become a donor, blood typing may be required. It's one of the first of several tests used to see if a possible donor and recipient are a good match.

Blood type is sometimes used as part of the process of determining whether or not someone is a blood relative.

What does an ABO group blood test check for?

The markers or antigens on the surface of red blood cells are used to determine blood types. The A and B antigens are two primary antigens or surface identifiers on human RBCs. Blood typing determines a person's ABO blood group by detecting the presence or absence of these antigens.

Blood group A is made up of people who have A antigens in their red blood cells, blood group B is made up of people who have B antigens in their red blood cells, blood group AB is made up of people who have both A and B antigens in their red blood cells, and blood group O is made up of people who don't have either of these markers.

Our bodies develop antibodies against antigens A and B that aren't found on our red blood cells. Anti-B antibodies are directed against the B antigens on red blood cells in people with blood type A, while anti-A antibodies are directed against the A antigens in people with blood type B. People with type AB blood do not have either of these antibodies, whereas people with type O blood do.

These antibodies are helpful in detecting a person's blood type and determining which blood kinds he or she can safely receive. If a person with antibodies directed against the B antigen, for example, is transfused with type B blood, his or her own antibodies will attack and kill the transfused red blood cells, resulting in serious and perhaps fatal consequences. As a result, matching a person's blood type to the blood that will be transfused is crucial.

Antibodies to Rh are not created spontaneously, unlike antibodies to A and B antigens. That is, Rh antibodies form only when a person without Rh factor on their red blood cells is exposed to Rh positive red blood cells. When a Rh-negative mother is pregnant with a Rh-positive kid, or when a Rh-negative individual is transfused with Rh-positive blood, this might happen during pregnancy or birth. In either instance, the first encounter to the Rh antigen may not trigger a robust immune response to Rh positive cells, but subsequent exposures may result in severe reactions.

Lab tests often ordered with an ABO Group test:

  • Rh Typing
  • Direct Antiglobulin Test
  • RBC Antibody Screen
  • HLA Testing
  • Compatibility Testing

Conditions where an ABO Group test is recommended:

  • Anemia
  • Bleeding Disorders
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use an ABO Group test?

Blood typing is used to determine a person's blood group, whether they are blood group A, B, AB, or O.

Blood typing can be used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Ensure that the blood type of a person who needs a blood transfusion or blood components is compatible with the ABO types of the unit of blood that will be transfused. To establish what type of blood or blood components a person can safely receive, blood typing is frequently used in conjunction with other tests such as an RBC antibody screen and a crossmatch. If a unit of blood carrying an ABO antigen to which the blood recipient has an antibody is transfused to the recipient, a potentially deadly transfusion response can result. People with blood group O, for example, have anti-A and anti-B antibodies in their blood. If this person receives a unit of blood from group A, B, or AB, the antibodies in the recipient's blood will react with the red blood cells, killing them and perhaps causing major consequences.
  • At a collection center, determine the blood group of potential blood donors. Donor blood units are blood typed and appropriately labeled so that they can be used for people who require a specific ABO group.
  • As part of the workup for a transplant surgery, determine the blood group of possible donors and recipients of organs, tissues, or bone marrow. ABO blood type is used in conjunction with HLA testing to identify and match organ and tissue donors with recipients who have the same or a sufficient number of matching HLA genes and antigens.

What do my ABO Group test results mean?

Blood typing determines if a person is type A, B, AB, or O. The results will inform the healthcare provider about whether blood or blood components are safe to provide to the patient.

Donated blood typing is significant because it allows health care providers to determine whether patients are compatible with the blood and may safely receive it.

When a donated organ, tissue, or bone marrow is compatible with the intended recipient, it is less likely to be rejected immediately after transplantation.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Most Popular

Description: ABO Group and Rh type is a blood test that is used to determine which blood group and Rh type you are.

Also Known As: Blood group test, blood type test, blood group and Rh type test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Whole Blood

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an ABO Group and Rh Type test ordered?

All donated blood undergoes ABO grouping and Rh typing. They're also used when someone needs a blood transfusion. The following conditions or circumstances may necessitate a transfusion:

  • Anemia that is severe, as well as anemia-causing illnesses such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia
  • During or after surgery when you have bleeding
  • Trauma or injury
  • Excessive blood loss 
  • Chemotherapy and  cancer
  • Hemophilia and similar bleeding disorders

When a woman becomes pregnant, she is tested to see if she is Rh negative or positive. Soon after birth, all newborn babies of Rh-negative mothers are tested for ABO and Rh to see if the mother need Rh immune globulin.

When an individual becomes a candidate to receive an organ, tissue, or bone marrow transplant, or when a person decides to become a donor, blood typing may be required. It's one of the first of several tests used to see if a possible donor and recipient are a good match.

Blood type is sometimes used as part of the process of determining whether or not someone is a blood relative.

What does an ABO Group and Rh Type blood test check for?

The markers or antigens on the surface of red blood cells are used to determine blood types. The A and B antigens are two primary antigens or surface identifiers on human RBCs. Rh is another essential surface antigen. Blood typing determines a person's ABO blood group and Rh type by detecting the presence or absence of these antigens.

Blood group A is made up of people who have A antigens in their red blood cells, blood group B is made up of people who have B antigens in their red blood cells, blood group AB is made up of people who have both A and B antigens in their red blood cells, and blood group O is made up of people who don't have either of these markers.

A person's blood type is Rh+ if the Rh protein is present on red blood cells; if it is not, the person's blood type is Rh-.

Our bodies develop antibodies against antigens A and B that aren't found on our red blood cells. Anti-B antibodies are directed against the B antigens on red blood cells in people with blood type A, while anti-A antibodies are directed against the A antigens in people with blood type B. People with type AB blood do not have either of these antibodies, whereas people with type O blood do.

These antibodies are helpful in detecting a person's blood type and determining which blood kinds he or she can safely receive. If a person with antibodies directed against the B antigen, for example, is transfused with type B blood, his or her own antibodies will attack and kill the transfused red blood cells, resulting in serious and perhaps fatal consequences. As a result, matching a person's blood type to the blood that will be transfused is crucial.

Antibodies to Rh are not created spontaneously, unlike antibodies to A and B antigens. That is, Rh antibodies form only when a person without Rh factor on their red blood cells is exposed to Rh positive red blood cells. When a Rh-negative mother is pregnant with a Rh-positive kid, or when a Rh-negative individual is transfused with Rh-positive blood, this might happen during pregnancy or birth. In either instance, the first encounter to the Rh antigen may not trigger a robust immune response to Rh positive cells, but subsequent exposures may result in severe reactions.

Lab tests often ordered with an ABO Group and Rh Type test:

  • Direct Antiglobulin Test
  • RBC Antibody Screen
  • HLA Testing
  • Compatibility Testing

Conditions where an ABO Group and Rh Type test is recommended:

  • Anemia
  • Bleeding Disorders
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use an ABO Group and Rh Type test?

Blood typing is used to determine a person's blood group, including whether they are blood group A, B, AB, or O, as well as whether they are Rh positive or negative.

Blood typing can be used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Ensure that the blood type of a person who needs a blood transfusion or blood components is compatible with the ABO and Rh types of the unit of blood that will be transfused. Blood typing is usually used in conjunction with other tests, such as an RBC antibody screen and a crossmatch, to determine what type of blood or blood components a person can safely receive. A potentially fatal transfusion reaction may occur if a unit of blood harboring an ABO antigen to which the blood recipient has an antibody is transfused to the recipient. Anti-A and anti-B antibodies, for instance, are present in the blood of people with blood group O. The antibodies in the recipient's blood will react with the red blood cells in this individual if they get a unit of blood from group A, B, or AB, destroying them and possibly having serious effects.
  • In the same way, if a Rh-negative person is transfused with Rh-positive blood, the person is likely to develop antibodies against Rh-positive blood. Although the recipient is unaffected by this scenario during the current transfusion, a future transfusion with Rh-positive blood could produce a significant transfusion reaction.
  • Determine the compatibility of a pregnant lady and her unborn child. Because a mother and her fetus may be incompatible, Rh type is especially significant during pregnancy. If the mother is Rh negative but the father is Rh positive, the fetus may test positive for the Rh antigen. As a result, the mother's body may produce antibodies against the Rh antigen. Hemolytic sickness of the fetus and infant could arise from the antibodies penetrating the placenta and destroying the baby's red blood cells. If the infant is Rh-positive, an injection of Rh immune globulin is given to the Rh-negative mother both during pregnancy and again after delivery to stop the production of Rh antibodies. The Rh immune globulin binds to and "masks" the fetus's Rh antigen during pregnancy and delivery to stop the mother from producing antibodies against it.
  • Determine the blood type of potential blood donors at a collection facility. Blood units from donors are blood typed and properly labeled so they can be utilized for patients who need a certain ABO group and Rh type.
  • The blood type of potential donors and recipients of organs, tissues, or bone marrow should be ascertained as part of the preparation for a transplant surgery. To identify and match organ and tissue donors with recipients who have the same or a sufficient number of matching HLA genes and antigens, ABO blood type is utilized in conjunction with HLA testing.

What do my ABO Group and Rh Type test results mean?

Blood typing determines if a person is type A, B, AB, or O, as well as whether he or she is Rh negative or positive. The results will inform the healthcare provider about whether blood or blood components are safe to provide to the patient.

The results of blood typing will reveal if a pregnant woman is Rh positive or negative. This information will help determine whether she is a candidate for Rh immune globulin, which prevents antibodies from forming against her fetus' blood cells.

Donated blood typing is significant because it allows health care providers to determine whether patients are compatible with the blood and may safely receive it.

When a donated organ, tissue, or bone marrow is compatible with the intended recipient, it is less likely to be rejected immediately after transplantation.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The Different Blood Types

There are four major blood groups and eight different blood types. Doctors call this the ABO Blood Group System.

The groups are based on whether or not you have two specific antigens -- A and B:

  • Group A has the A antigen and B antibody.
  • Group B has the B antigen and the A antibody.
  • Group AB has A and B antigens but neither A nor B antibodies.
  • Group O doesn’t have A or B antigens but has both A and B antibodies.

There’s also a third kind of antigen called the Rh factor. You either have this antigen (meaning your blood type is “Rh+” or “positive”), or you don’t (meaning your blood type is “Rh-” or “negative”). So, from the four blood groups, there are eight blood types:

  • A positive or A negative
  • B positive or B negative
  • AB positive or AB negative
  • O positive or O negative

ABOtype and Rh are needed from cord blood to determine the newborn's blood type and Rh.

Absolute Lymphocyte Count includes: WBC, Absolute Lymphocytes, % Lymphocytes, % Reactive Lymphocytes

Clinical Significance

Increased understanding of immunodeficiency syndrome and AIDS have identified the importance of absolute lymphocyte count in addition to the specific cell type such as CD4 lymphocytes. In pediatric ages up to 14 years old, acute infectious lymphocytosis is a clinical disorder, suspected to be of enterovirus-Coxsackie A subgroup that may have upper respiratory symptoms, fever, diarrhea and abdominal pain or a totally asymptomatic clinical course. Other conditions with absolute lymphocytosis are B. pertussis infection and lymphocytic leukemoid reaction. The most commonly known lymphocytosis with atypical morphology is due to cytomegalovirus and infectious mononucleosis. The malignant forms of absolute lymphocytosis are mostly due to lymphoproliferative disorders.


Clinical Significance

This test can be used to detect the presence or absence of large deletions in the HBA1 or HBA2 gene in patients or their family members suspected of having alpha thalassemia or who are carriers of alpha globin deletions. The assay can also be used in the prenatal diagnosis of alpha thalassemia. The assay does not determine the type or breakpoint of the rearrangement. This assay can be used instead of southern blot analysis to determine the total number of intact alpha globin genes.

Methodology

Capillary Electrophoresis • Multiplex PCR

Limitations

This test does not identify whether a two-gene deletion is in cis (on the same chromosome) or trans (on opposite chromosomes). In the absence of a coexisting deletion on the opposite chromosome, this test can identify the presence of an extra alpha globin gene (alpha triplication).

Alternative Name(s)

Hydrops Fetalis,Alpha-Globin Rare Deletion/Duplication,Hemoglobin Barts Hydrops Fetalis,Alpha-Globin Gene Triplication,Alpha-Globin Gene Number,Hemoglobin H Disease,Alpha-Thalassemia


Amino acid analysis is necessary for the diagnosis of a variety of inborn errors of metabolism. These include, but are not limited to, phenylketonuria, tyrosimemia, citrullinemia, non-ketotic hyperglycinemia, maple syrup urine disease, and homocystinuria. The assay is also key for the continued monitoring of treatment plans for these disorders and useful for assessing nutritional status of patients. Our methodology is highly accurate at very low levels as well as at elevated levels.

This is a fasting test:  Minimun 4 hours after your last meal, or overnite for most accurate reading.  Non fasting specimens are acceptable for Pediatrics

 


Description: An antinuclear antibody screening is a blood test that is going to look for a positive or negative result. If the result comes back as positive further test will be done to look for ANA Titer and Pattern. Antinuclear antibodies are associated with Lupus.

Also Known As: ANA Test, ANA Screen IFA with Reflex to Titer and pattern IFA Test, ANA with Reflex Test, Antinuclear Antibody Screen Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

IMPORTANT Reflex Information: If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge of $13.00

When is an ANA Screen test ordered?

When someone exhibits signs and symptoms of a systemic autoimmune illness, the ANA test is requested. Symptoms of autoimmune illnesses can be vague and non-specific, and they can fluctuate over time, steadily deteriorate, or oscillate between periods of flare-ups and remissions.

What does an ANA Screen blood test check for?

Antinuclear antibodies are a type of antibody produced by the immune system when it is unable to differentiate between its own cells and foreign cells. Autoantibodies are antibodies that attack the body's own healthy cells, causing symptoms like tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle discomfort, and weariness. The moniker "antinuclear" comes from the fact that ANA specifically targets chemicals located in a cell's nucleus. The presence of these autoantibodies in the blood is detected by the ANA test.

The presence of ANA may be a sign of an autoimmune process, and it has been linked to a variety of autoimmune illnesses, the most common of which being systemic lupus erythematosus.

One of the most common tests used to detect an autoimmune disorder or rule out other conditions with comparable signs and symptoms is the ANA test. As a result, it's frequently followed by other autoantibody tests that can help establish a diagnosis. An ENA panel, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, and/or anti-histone test are examples of these.

Lab tests often ordered with an ANA Screen test:

  • ENA Panel
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Complement
  • AMA
  • Centromere antibody
  • Histone Antibody

Conditions where an ANA Screen test is recommended:

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sjogren Syndrome
  • Scleroderma

How does my health care provider use an ANA Screen test?

One of the most often performed tests to diagnose systemic lupus erythematosus is the antinuclear antibody test. It serves as the first step in the evaluation process for autoimmune diseases that might impact various body tissues and organs.

When a person's immune system fails to discriminate between their own cells and foreign cells, autoantibodies called ANA are created. They attack chemicals found in a cell's nucleus, causing organ and tissue damage.

ANA testing may be utilized in conjunction with or after other autoantibody tests, depending on a person's indications and symptoms and the suspected condition. Antibodies that target specific compounds within cell nuclei, such as anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, anti-nucleolar, anti-histone, and anti-RNA antibodies, are detected by some of these tests, which are considered subsets of the general ANA test. In addition, an ENA panel can be utilized as a follow-up to an ANA.

These further tests are performed in addition to a person's clinical history to assist diagnose or rule out other autoimmune conditions such Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis, and scleroderma.

To detect ANA, various laboratories may employ different test procedures. Immunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody are two typical approaches. The IFA is regarded as the gold standard. Some labs will test for ANA using immunoassay and then employ IFA to confirm positive or equivocal results.

An indirect fluorescent antibody is created by mixing a person's blood sample with cells attached to a slide. Autoantibodies in the blood bind to the cells and cause them to react. A fluorescent antibody reagent is used to treat the slide, which is then inspected under a microscope. The existence of fluorescence is observed, as well as the pattern of fluorescence.

Immunoassays—these procedures are frequently carried out using automated equipment, however they are less sensitive than IFA in identifying ANA.

Other laboratory tests linked to inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or C-reactive protein, can be used to assess a person's risk of SLE or another autoimmune disease.

What do my ANA test results mean?

A positive ANA test indicates the presence of autoantibodies. This shows the presence of an autoimmune disease in someone who has signs and symptoms, but more testing is needed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Because ANA test results can be positive in persons who have no known autoimmune disease, they must be carefully assessed in conjunction with a person's indications and symptoms.

Because an ANA test can become positive before signs and symptoms of an autoimmune disease appear, determining the meaning of a positive ANA in a person who has no symptoms can take some time.

SLE is unlikely to be diagnosed with a negative ANA result. It is normally not required to repeat a negative ANA test right away; however, because autoimmune illnesses are episodic, it may be desirable to repeat the ANA test at a later date if symptoms persist.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Anion Gap Panel (Electrolyte Balance) includes the following test.

  • Anion gap 4
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Chloride
  • Carbon dioxide

IMPORTANT THIS IS A REFLUX TEST

Additional test processing fees will be charged if initial results dictate Reflex (further) testing.

REFLUX TESTS & CHARGES

  • ANTIBODY PANEL X 1 charge $89.00 
  • ANTIBODY TITER X 1 charge $29 
  • ANTIGEN TYPE X 1 charge $39 
  • ANTIBODY PANEL X 2 charge $ 179.00

This test is used to detect significant RBC antibodies.


The Antiphospholipid Antibody Panel is a comprehensive test that measures nine biomarkers associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). APS is an autoimmune disorder that can lead to recurrent miscarriages, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications. The panel includes tests for beta-2-glycoprotein I antibodies, phosphatidylserine antibodies, and cardiolipin antibodies. This comprehensive testing will provide your healthcare provider with important information about your risk for APS and allow them to tailor your treatment accordingly.

This comprehensive testing will provide your healthcare provider with important information about your risk for APS and allow them to tailor your treatment accordingly. If you have been diagnosed with APS, it is important to see your healthcare provider regularly and follow their treatment recommendations. Sometimes, treatment with blood thinners or other medications may be necessary to prevent serious complications. Most people with APS can lead healthy, normal lives with proper management.

What is included in the antiphospholipid panel?

The panel includes tests for

  • Beta-2-Glycoprotein I Antibodies (IgG, IgA, IgM)
  • Phosphatidylserine Antibodies (IgG, IgA, IgM)
  • Cardiolipin Antibodies (IgA, IgG, IgM)

What is the antiphospholipid antibody panel test for?

The Antiphospholipid Antibody Panel is a comprehensive test that measures nine biomarkers associated with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). APS is an autoimmune disorder that can lead to recurrent miscarriages, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications. The panel includes tests for beta-2-glycoprotein I antibodies, phosphatidylserine antibodies, and cardiolipin antibodies. This comprehensive testing will provide your healthcare provider with important information about your risk for APS and allow them to tailor your treatment accordingly.

What do the results of an antiphospholipid antibody panel test mean?

A positive result on any of the panel tests suggests that you have antibodies associated with APS in your blood. This does not necessarily indicate that you have APS, but it raises your chances of having the disorder. Your healthcare professional will analyze your results and, if necessary, conduct more tests.

What follow-up is necessary after an antiphospholipid antibody panel test?

If you have a positive result on any of the tests in the panel, your healthcare provider will likely order additional testing to confirm the diagnosis of APS. Once APS has been diagnosed, it is important to see your healthcare provider regularly and follow their treatment recommendations. Treatment with blood thinners or other drugs may be required in some cases to avoid serious consequences. With careful management, most persons with APS can live healthy, regular lives.

Is APS the same as lupus?

No, APS is an autoimmune condition that can cause thrombosis, repeated miscarriages, and pregnancy difficulties. Chronic inflammatory disease called lupus can harm several organs. Although they are both autoimmune illnesses, the two conditions are not the same.

Is APS an autoimmune disease?

Yes, APS is an autoimmune condition. When the body's immune system targets healthy cells and tissues, autoimmune disorders result. In APS, the immune system assaults the ubiquitous phospholipids present in all cells. This can result in repeated miscarriages, thrombosis, and problems during pregnancy.

What are the symptoms of APS?

The most common symptom of APS is recurrent miscarriages. Other symptoms may include thrombosis, pregnancy complications, and stroke. Many people with APS do not have any symptoms.

What are the causes of APS?

The exact causes of APS remain unknown. However, it is believed to be a result of both genetic and environmental influences.

What are the risks of APS?

APS can lead to recurrent miscarriages, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications. If left untreated, APS can also lead to stroke or heart attack.

How is APS diagnosed?

APS is typically diagnosed with a blood test. The Antiphospholipid Antibody Panel is a comprehensive test that measures nine different biomarkers that are associated with APS. Your healthcare practitioner will assist you in interpreting your results and, if required, order more tests.

How is APS treated?

There is no cure for APS. However, it is treatable with medicine and lifestyle modifications. Medications may include blood thinners or other medications to prevent serious complications. Lifestyle changes may include avoiding smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and managing stress. With proper management, most people with APS can lead healthy, normal lives.

What is the prognosis for APS?

The prognosis for APS is generally good. Most people with APS can lead healthy, normal lives with proper diagnosis and treatment. However, APS can lead to serious complications if it is not properly managed. Recurrent miscarriages, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications are the most common complications associated with APS. If left untreated, APS can also lead to stroke or heart attack.

What are the three antiphospholipid antibodies?

The three antiphospholipid antibodies are beta-2-glycoprotein I, phosphatidylserine, and cardiolipin. These antibodies are associated with APS and can lead to recurrent miscarriages, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications.



The BCA Chemistry Panel contains the following tests.

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Uric Acid

Collection Instructions

Allow sample to clot for 30 minutes, spin at 3,000 RPM for 10 minutes and transfer serum to plastic, amber vial. If amber vial is not available, wrap tube in aluminum foil to protect from light. Freeze within 30 minutes and send frozen.


C4B is a complement binding protein that specifically binds 50% circulating protein S, a vitamin K dependent cofactor of protein C activation. Since C4B may be elevated in certain disease states, this may affect the available "free protein S" to engage in anticoagulant activity.

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Description: A Calcium test is a blood test that is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a wide range of medical conditions.

Also Known As: Ca Test, Serum Calcium Test, Calcium Blood Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Calcium test ordered?

A blood calcium test is frequently requested during a general medical evaluation. It's usually part of the comprehensive metabolic panel or the basic metabolic panel, two sets of tests that can be done during an initial evaluation or as part of a routine medical checks.

Many people do not experience symptoms of high or low calcium until their levels are dangerously high or low.

When a person has certain types of cancer, kidney illness, or has had a kidney transplant, calcium monitoring may be required. When someone is being treated for abnormal calcium levels, monitoring may be required to determine the effectiveness of medications such as calcium or vitamin D supplements.

What does a Calcium blood test check for?

Calcium is one of the most plentiful and vital minerals in the human body. It is required for cell signaling as well as the proper operation of muscles, nerves, and the heart. Calcium is essential for blood clotting as well as bone growth, density, and maintenance. This test determines how much calcium is present in the blood.

Calcium is found complexed in the bones for 99 percent of the time, while the remaining 1% circulates in the blood. Calcium levels are closely monitored; if too little is absorbed or consumed, or if too much is lost through the kidney or stomach, calcium is removed from bone to keep blood concentrations stable. Approximately half of the calcium in the blood is metabolically active and "free." The other half is "bound" to albumin, with a minor proportion complexed to anions like phosphate, and both of these forms are metabolically inactive.

Blood calcium can be measured using two different tests. The free and bound forms of calcium are measured in the total calcium test. Only the free, physiologically active form of calcium is measured in the ionized calcium test.

Lab tests often ordered with a Calcium test:

  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Magnesium
  • PTH
  • Albumin
  • Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

Conditions where a Calcium test is recommended:

  • Kidney Disease
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Alcoholism
  • Malnutrition
  • Parathyroid Diseases
  • Breast Cancer
  • Multiple Myeloma

How does my health care provider use a Calcium test?

A blood calcium test is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a variety of bone, heart, nerve, kidney, and tooth disorders. If a person has signs of a parathyroid disease, malabsorption, or an overactive thyroid, the test may be ordered.

A total calcium level is frequently checked as part of a standard health check. It's part of the comprehensive metabolic panel and the basic metabolic panel, which are both collections of tests used to diagnose or monitor a range of ailments.

When a total calcium result is abnormal, it is interpreted as a sign of an underlying disease. Additional tests to assess ionized calcium, urine calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and PTH-related peptide are frequently performed to assist determine the underlying problem. PTH and vitamin D are in charge of keeping calcium levels in the blood within a narrow range of values.

Measuring calcium and PTH combined can assist identify whether the parathyroid glands are functioning normally if the calcium is abnormal. Testing for vitamin D, phosphorus, and/or magnesium can assist evaluate whether the kidneys are excreting the right amount of calcium, and measuring urine calcium can help detect whether additional deficits or excesses exist. The balance of these many compounds is frequently just as critical as their concentrations.

The total calcium test is the most common test used to determine calcium status. Because the balance between free and bound calcium is usually constant and predictable, it is a reliable reflection of the quantity of free calcium present in the blood in most cases. However, the balance between bound and free calcium is altered in some persons, and total calcium is not a good indicator of calcium status. Ionized calcium measurement may be required in certain cases. Critically sick patients, those receiving blood transfusions or intravenous fluids, patients undergoing major surgery, and persons with blood protein disorders such low albumin are all candidates for ionized calcium testing.

What do my Calcium test results mean?

The amount of calcium circulating in the blood is not the same as the amount of calcium in the bones.

A feedback loop including PTH and vitamin D regulates and stabilizes calcium uptake, utilization, and excretion. Conditions and disorders that disturb calcium control can induce abnormal acute or chronic calcium elevations or declines, resulting in hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia symptoms.

Total calcium is usually tested instead of ionized calcium since it is easier to do and requires no additional treatment of the blood sample. Because the free and bound forms of calcium make up about half of the total, total calcium is usually a decent depiction of free calcium. Because nearly half of the calcium in blood is bonded to protein, high or low protein levels might alter total calcium test findings. In these circumstances, an ionized calcium test is more appropriate for measuring free calcium.

A normal total or ionized calcium test, when combined with other normal laboratory findings, indicates that a person's calcium metabolism is normal and blood levels are properly managed.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Urinary calcium reflects dietary intake, rate of calcium absorption by the intestine and bone resorption. Urinary calcium is used primarily to evaluate parathyroid function and the effects of vitamin D. A significant number of patients with primary hyperparathyroidism will have elevated urinary calcium. However, there are other clinical entities that may be associated with increased urine calcium: Sarcoidosis, Paget's disease of bone, vitamin D intoxication, hyperthyroidism and glucocorticoid excess. Decreased urine calcium is seen with thiazide diuretics, vitamin D deficiency and familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia.

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Description: An ionized calcium test is a blood test that is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a wide range of medical conditions.

Also Known As: Ionized Ca Test, Serum Ionized Calcium Test, Calcium Blood Test, Calcium Ionized Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Ionized Calcium test ordered?

A blood calcium test is frequently requested during a general medical evaluation. It's usually part of the comprehensive metabolic panel or the basic metabolic panel, two sets of tests that can be done during an initial evaluation or as part of a routine medical checks.

Many people do not experience symptoms of high or low calcium until their levels are dangerously high or low.

When someone develops numbness around the mouth, hands, and feet, as well as muscle spasms in those areas, an ionized calcium test may be ordered. Low ionized calcium levels can cause these symptoms. When calcium levels fall slowly, however, many people have no symptoms.

What does an Ionized Calcium blood test check for?

Calcium is one of the most plentiful and vital minerals in the human body. It is required for cell signaling as well as the proper operation of muscles, nerves, and the heart. Calcium is essential for blood clotting as well as bone growth, density, and maintenance. This test determines how much calcium is present in the blood.

Calcium is found complexed in the bones for 99 percent of the time, while the remaining 1% circulates in the blood. Calcium levels are closely monitored; if too little is absorbed or consumed, or if too much is lost through the kidney or stomach, calcium is removed from bone to keep blood concentrations stable. Approximately half of the calcium in the blood is metabolically active and "free." The other half is "bound" to albumin, with a minor proportion complexed to anions like phosphate, and both of these forms are metabolically inactive.

Blood calcium can be measured using two different tests. The free and bound forms of calcium are measured in the total calcium test. Only the free, physiologically active form of calcium is measured in the ionized calcium test.

Lab tests often ordered with an Ionized Calcium test:

  • Phosphorus
  • Vitamin D
  • Magnesium
  • PTH
  • Magnesium
  • Albumin
  • Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

Conditions where an Ionized Calcium test is recommended:

  • Kidney Disease
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Alcoholism
  • Malnutrition
  • Parathyroid Diseases
  • Breast Cancer
  • Multiple Myeloma

How does my health care provider use an Ionized Calcium test?

A blood calcium test is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a variety of bone, heart, nerve, kidney, and tooth disorders. If a person has signs of a parathyroid disease, malabsorption, or an overactive thyroid, the test may be ordered.

A total calcium level is frequently checked as part of a standard health check. It's part of the comprehensive metabolic panel and the basic metabolic panel, which are both collections of tests used to diagnose or monitor a range of ailments.

When a total calcium result is abnormal, it is interpreted as a sign of an underlying disease. Additional tests to assess ionized calcium, urine calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, and PTH-related peptide are frequently performed to assist determine the underlying problem. PTH and vitamin D are in charge of keeping calcium levels in the blood within a narrow range of values.

Measuring calcium and PTH combined can assist identify whether the parathyroid glands are functioning normally if the calcium is abnormal. Testing for vitamin D, phosphorus, and/or magnesium can assist evaluate whether the kidneys are excreting the right amount of calcium, and measuring urine calcium can help detect whether additional deficits or excesses exist. The balance of these many compounds is frequently just as critical as their concentrations.

The total calcium test is the most common test used to determine calcium status. Because the balance between free and bound calcium is usually constant and predictable, it is a reliable reflection of the quantity of free calcium present in the blood in most cases. However, the balance between bound and free calcium is altered in some persons, and total calcium is not a good indicator of calcium status. Ionized calcium measurement may be required in certain cases. Critically sick patients, those receiving blood transfusions or intravenous fluids, patients undergoing major surgery, and persons with blood protein disorders such low albumin are all candidates for ionized calcium testing.

What do my Ionized Calcium test results mean?

The amount of calcium circulating in the blood is not the same as the amount of calcium in the bones.

A feedback loop including PTH and vitamin D regulates and stabilizes calcium uptake, utilization, and excretion. Conditions and disorders that disturb calcium control can induce abnormal acute or chronic calcium elevations or declines, resulting in hypercalcemia or hypocalcemia symptoms.

Total calcium is usually tested instead of ionized calcium since it is easier to do and requires no additional treatment of the blood sample. Because the free and bound forms of calcium make up about half of the total, total calcium is usually a decent depiction of free calcium. Because nearly half of the calcium in blood is bonded to protein, high or low protein levels might alter total calcium test findings. In these circumstances, an ionized calcium test is more appropriate for measuring free calcium.

A normal total or ionized calcium test, when combined with other normal laboratory findings, indicates that a person's calcium metabolism is normal and blood levels are properly managed.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of numerous potentially serious disorders associated with changes in body acid-base balance.


There are various kinds of blood disorders. The most frequent ones are blood cancers, clotting disorders, bleeding disorders, and anemias. Like many diseases, early diagnosis is critical for future treatment and care. Continue reading to learn more information concerning these disorders and what measures you can employ to deal with any symptoms you may face. 

What is a Blood Disorder? 

A blood disorder is an illness that hampers the ability of the blood to work properly. Blood disorders tend to impact the following parts of the blood.  

  • Red blood cells transport oxygen throughout the body and carry carbon dioxide to the lungs for expulsion. 
  • White blood cells: These cells are produced in the bone marrow and assist the body in fighting diseases and infections.  
  • Thrombocytes or platelets: These blood cells are colorless and assist the body in forming blood clots. 

Blood Disorder Types 

Here are the common types of blood disorders. 

  • Red blood cell disorders include aplastic anemia, vitamin deficiency anemia, and iron deficiency anemia.
  • White blood cell disorders include myelodysplastic syndrome, lymphoma, and leukemia.
  • Platelet disorders include Bernard-Soulier syndrome, Von Willebrand disease, and hemophilia. 

These disorders decrease the number of proteins, platelets, and cells in the blood, inhibiting a person’s bodily functions. Frequently, mutations can result in the parents transmuting these ailments to their kids. Additionally, lifestyles and medical conditions can also cause these disorders. 

Blood Disorder Symptoms 

Symptoms may be different depending on the type of blood disorder. Nevertheless, here are some of the most frequent blood disorder symptoms. 

  • A diminished red blood cell or hemoglobin concentration may result in anemia symptoms, including shortness of breath, weakness, and extreme fatigue.  
  • Diminished white blood cells may result in chronic infections and fever. 
  • People with decreased platelet levels may suffer from unusual bruising or bleeding. 

Blood Disorder Treatments 

Blood disorder treatments are contingent on the kind of blood disorder, just like blood disorder symptoms. The aim of treatment is to promote the production of blood cells, contain the immune system, and destroy anomalous cells. Here are a few treatments for blood disorders.  

  • Therapeutic options include supplements, antibiotics, and Nplate.
  • Patients may have to undergo a bone marrow transplant surgery for serious blood disorders or receive a blood transfusion.

If you desire to play a more proactive part in knowing and treating your blood ailment, you should consider looking into Ulta Lab Tests to get more information.  

Lab Tests for Blood Disorder 

At Ulta Lab Tests, we offer medical-approved lab testing services to assist you in establishing the exact cause of your ailment. Our tests are reliable and highly accurate and will assist you in monitoring your overall health and wellness. 

When you take a blood disorder test with us, you can conveniently have your specimen drawn at one of our 2,100 certified patient service centers near you. We will also send the results directly to your online account with utmost privacy. From there, you can decide to review it with your healthcare provider. 

Continue reading on to find more information concerning the inclusion of our platelet, white blood cell, and red blood cell tests that are on offer. 

Red Blood Cell Tests   

White Blood Cell Tests 

Platelet Tests 

If you want to have a specific condition tested, make sure to review our extensive list of clinical lab exams today. We have thousands of lab tests in our system, so you can be assured of finding a test that is suited for you. 

Frequently Asked Questions 

We understand how overwhelming it can be to learn about blood disorders, especially those new to lab testing. Continue reading on to get an insight into some of the frequently asked questions our customers usually ask.  

Can a Blood Disorder be Cured? 

Surgeries or medications can often treat blood disorders such as deep vein thrombosis, lymphoma, leukemia, and anemia. And just like other types of diseases, early diagnosis and treatment will go a long way for your health.  

Are All Blood Disorders Cancer? 

Not all blood disorders are cancer. There are numerous misconceptions regarding these conditions, but advancements in medicine have proven blood disorder treatments to be effective. The fatal blood cancers in the past currently have a survival rate of 80%.  

How Do Experts Test for Blood Clotting Disorders? 

Medical experts usually make use of a partial thromboplastin time (PTT) to examine blood clotting disorders. It’s an effective method of timing the duration it takes for blood to clot. 

For more FAQs, make sure to have a look at our Quick Answers page.

The Ulta Lab Tests Advantage 

Now you can easily buy blood disorder lab tests online. At Ulta Lab Tests, we raise the experience of our customers by streamlining the processes.  

Here’s why to choose us:  

Secure and Confidential Results 

Our clients can directly order their lab tests using an online account. At Ulta Lab Tests, we give you the opportunity of creating an account to restrict access to your information, such as preferred Patient Service Center and previous orders. As the laboratory releases your results, they will be visible on your dashboard from where you can decide to share the information with your physician or not. We guarantee security and privacy, so nobody else has access to your lab results unless you choose to share the information.

No Insurance or Referral Needed 

The best part about how we conduct our operations at Ulta Lab Tests is that we will provide our services to anybody who requires it, regardless of if that individual has medical health coverage or not. Anybody with an Ulta Lab Tests account can easily buy our affordable blood disorder tests. We have a total of 2,100 patient service centers scattered nationwide to draw your specimens.  

Affordable Pricing Including Doctor’s Order 

Over recent years, we have strived to provide considerable pricing discounts to our customers from the same Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) approved labs most medical experts use. Our pricing is up to 90% off the price labs would charge you directly, significantly decreasing costs for patients with no insurance or high deductibles. 

100% Satisfaction Guarantee 

When you select our service for your blood disorder test, you are assured of one thing: 100% customer satisfaction. We provide the most private, most secure, and safest services nationwide, improving the experience of maintaining a clean bill of health. If you aren’t sure whether we are your go-to health management service provider nationwide, make sure to review the advantages of selecting Ulta Lab Tests today.  

Manage Your Health Anytime, Anywhere 

With us by your side, you can play an active role in knowing and managing your health condition. We offer more than one thousand lab tests, including tests for blood disorders. We guarantee our customers a confidential, secure, and safe testing process. 

Take charge of your health and get your blood tests done today with Ulta Lab Tests