Infertility for Women

The female infertility tests include day 3 follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol (E2), AMH, prolactin, testosterone (T), progesterone (P4), 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), thyroxin (T4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). Order from Ulta Lab Tests today, with confidential results available in 24 to 48 hours online.


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17-hydroxyprogesterone is elevated in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). CAH is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by a deficiency of cortisol and an excess of ACTH concentration. 17-hydroxyprogesterone is also useful in monitoring cortisol replacement therapy and in evaluating infertility and adrenal and ovarian neoplasms.

AMH-MIS may be used in the investigation of ovarian reserve since AMH concentrations in adult women reflect the number of small antral and preantral follicles entering the growth phase of their life cycle. These follicles are proportional to the number of primordial follicles that still remain in the ovary, or the ovarian reserve.
AMH decreases throughout a woman's reproductive life, which reflects the continuous decline of the oocyte/follicle pool with age and, accordingly, ovarian aging.


DHEA is a weakly androgenic steroid that is useful when congenital adrenal hyperplasia is suspected. It is also useful in determining the source of androgens in hyperandrogenic conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome and adrenal tumors.

DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.


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Measuring the circulating levels of estradiol is important for assessing the ovarian function and monitoring follicular development for assisted reproduction protocols. Estradiol plays an essential role throughout the human menstrual cycle. Elevated estradiol levels in females may also result from primary or secondary ovarian hyperfunction. Very high estradiol levels are found during the induction of ovulation for assisted reproduction therapy or in pregnancy. Decreased estradiol levels in females may result from either lack of ovarian synthesis (primary ovarian hypofunction and menopause) or a lesion in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis (secondary ovarian hypofunction). Elevated estradiol levels in males may be due to increased aromatization of androgens, resulting in gynecomastia.

IMPORTANT - Note this Estradiol test is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute in Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS - #30289 at an additional charge of $34


Estrogens are secreted by the gonads, adrenal glands, and placenta. Total estrogens provide an overall picture of estrogen status for men and women.

This test is useful in the differential diagnosis of pituitary and gonadal insufficiency and in children with precocious puberty.

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This test is useful in the differential diagnosis of pituitary and gonadal insufficiency and in children with precocious puberty.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Levels increase sharply during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The level increases from 9 to 32 weeks of pregnancy.

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During pregnancy and postpartum lactation, serum prolactin can increase 10- to 20-fold. Exercise, stress, and sleep also cause transient increases in prolactin levels. Consistently elevated serum prolactin levels (>30 ng/mL), in the absence of pregnancy and postpartum lactation, are indicative of hyperprolactinemia. Hypersecretion of prolactin can be caused by pituitary adenomas, hypothalamic disease, breast or chest wall stimulation, renal failure or hypothyroidism. A number of drugs, including many antidepressants, are also common causes of abnormally elevated prolactin levels. Hyperprolactinemia often results in galactorrhea, amenorrhea, and infertility in females, and in impotence and hypogonadism in males. Renal failure, hypothyroidism, and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas are also common causes of abnormally elevated prolactin levels.

Prolactin is a single-chain polypeptide hormone secreted by the anterior pituitary under the control of prolactin-releasing factors. These inhibiting and releasing factors are secreted by the hypothalamus. Prolactin is also synthesized by the placenta and is present in amniotic fluid. Prolactin initiates and maintains lactation in females. It also plays a role in regulating gonadal function in both males and females. In adults, basal circulating prolactin is present in concentrations up to 30 ng/mL. During pregnancy and postpartum lactation, serum prolactin can increase 10-to 20-fold. Exercise, stress, and sleep also cause transient increases in prolactin levels. Consistently elevated serum prolactin levels greater than 30 ng/mL in the absence of pregnancy and postpartum lactation are indicative of hyperprolactinemia, which is the most common hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction encountered in clinical endocrinology. Hyperprolactinemia often results in galactorrhea, amenorrhea, and infertility in females, and in impotence and hypogonadism in males. Renal failure, hypothyroidism, and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas are also common causes of abnormally elevated prolactin levels.

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For diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

Note: Free T4 Index (T7) will only be calculated and reported if test code code 861 (T3 Uptake) is ordered as well.


Testosterone circulates almost entirely bound to transport proteins: normally less than 1% is free. Measurement of Free Testosterone may be useful when disturbances in Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) are suspected such as when patients are obese or have excessive estrogen. Testosterone measurements are used to assess erectile dysfunction, infertility, gynecomastia, and osteoporosis and to assess hormone replacement therapy.


This test is useful in the differential diagnosis of male hypogonadism. For males 18 years of age and older only. Pediatric and Female patients will need to order Testosterone, Total, MS #15983.

Please note: If Testosterone, Total, Males (Adult) Only #873 is ordered for a pediatric or female patient, the lab will automatically change the test to and charge for Testosterone, Total, MS #15983.


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The Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) Blood Test is for differential diagnosis of primary, secondary, and tertiary hypothyroidism. The TSH test is also useful in screening for hyperthyroidism. This assay allows adjustment of exogenous thyroxine dosage in hypothyroid patients and in patients on suppressive thyroxine therapy for thyroid neoplasia.



Infertility is the inability to conceive naturally after a minimum of 12 months of planned and unprotected intercourse (6 months if the women’s age is above 35).

Female infertility tests help in diagnosing the cause of infertility and in treating them appropriately. While there are multiple infertility tests available, starting with the non-invasive ones is a good idea.  

What are the common risk factors for infertility?

The following factors can aggravate the risk of infertility in women.

  • Age (women above 35 years are at higher risk).
  • Lifestyle habits (alcoholism, substance abuse, excessive smoking, etc.).
  • Weight issues (underweight and obesity).
  • Mental disorders such as stress and depression.
  • Underlying health issues such as sexually transmitted diseases, diabetes, thyroid issues, etc.
  • Women undergoing treatments like radiation therapy for cancer are at a higher risk of infertility.

Causes of Female Infertility 

The most important cause of infertility in women is related to ovulation. Other common reasons are damage to the fallopian tube or uterus and cervical problems. Different female infertility tests can be done to diagnose these conditions.

Problems Related to Ovulation

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): Women with PCOS experience erratic or prolonged menstrual periods. The ovaries develop numerous follicles and refuse to release eggs regularly. The hormonal imbalance caused by PCOS can lead to female infertility. PCOS is also associated with insulin resistance and obesity.

Premature Ovarian Failure: Premature ovarian failure can be caused by two main reasons, early loss of eggs due to a genetic condition or chemotherapy or an autoimmune response. The condition can occur as early as 40 years of age.

Thyroid Malfunctioning: The pituitary gland of the thyroid system produces two hormones that stimulate the ovary every month. The two hormones are Follicle-stimulating hormone and Luteinizing hormone (LH). Insufficient production of the hormones leads to infertility in women. Stress, obesity, physical strain, and substantial weight loss can affect hormone production.

Excess Prolactin (hyperprolactinemia): Prolactin is one of the hormones produced by the pituitary gland. Excess production of prolactin can cease menstruation or cause irregular menstruation. High levels of prolactin can also cause lowered progesterone levels in some women.

Problems Related to the Fallopian Tube and Uterus

The fallopian tubes connect the ovaries to the womb. Damaged fallopian tubes can be due to the following reasons.

  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (infection of the upper genital tract).
  • Scarring of the fallopian tubes due to surgeries.
  • Fibroids can block the fallopian tube and prevent the fertilized egg from attaching itself to the womb.
  • An abnormally shaped uterus.
  • Congenital disabilities in the fallopian tubes and uterus.

Female infertility tests can be used to detect the exact reason behind the damage.

Problems Related to Cervix

During ovulation, the cervical mucus is thinner to enable the sperm to swim efficiently. Abnormal cervical mucus can stop the sperm from reaching and fertilizing the egg.  Damage to the cervix during surgery or due to hereditary reasons can cause cervical stenosis, which is another cause of infertility.

Signs and Symptoms of Female Infertility?

Inability to conceive naturally is the main symptom of female infertility. A woman with infertility problems may have irregular, painful, or absent periods. Experiencing multiple miscarriages are another critical warning sign of infertility.

Lab Tests for Female Infertility

If you are going through any of the above symptoms for a prolonged period, it is time to consider female infertility tests. Female infertility treatment involves a few tests and examinations.

The first step is an open discussion with your doctor. The doctor may pose questions about your medical history, ongoing treatments, symptoms, use of birth control techniques in the past, and lifestyle practices. The next important step is to get the female infertility tests done with a reliable source. The most significant lab tests for female infertility are,

FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone) Testing

Purpose: FSH controls the menstrual cycle and regulates the growth of follicles in the ovary. The test is done to evaluate the supply of eggs and ovarian function.

Procedure: The blood test can be done on the second or third day of your menstrual cycle. 

Estradiol Testing

Purpose: The test measures the circulating levels of estradiol in the body. High levels of estradiol indicate an issue with the ovarian reserve and a suppressing effect on the FSH. Low levels of estradiol may be indicative of PCOS or hypopituitarism.

Procedure: The blood test can be taken on any day during the menstrual cycle.

LH Testing 

Purpose: A luteinizing hormone test is done to track issues with the pituitary gland. The tests may have to be repeated to map the time when the egg is released.

Procedure: While there are at-home LH tests available through drug stores, the accuracy of the test is optimal when taken with the help of professionals.

DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone)

Purpose: DHEA is a hormone secreted by the adrenal glands. It is a precursor to hormones such as testosterone and estrogen. Low levels of DHEA are associated with lowered ovarian reserve and infertility. The test is used in the diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and as well as adrenal tumor.

Procedure: A conventional blood test that can be done with experienced lab technicians.

Ultrasound Tests

Apart from female infertility tests that involve blood work, physical examination of the patients and ultrasounds tests are also done. The tests provide further information about the uterus, endometrial lining, and ovaries.

Irregular uterine shape, a more in-depth evaluation of the ovarian reserve, etc., can be determined through the tests.

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine states that infertility can affect men as much as it can affect women and therefore suggests that both partners should be tested. Visit your doctor with your partner and consider taking male infertility tests such as semen analysis, testosterone testing, etc.

Based on the above tests, the doctor will be able to diagnose the main reason behind infertility. The accuracy of these tests is very critical because they form the basis for the next steps. 

Order Your Tests from Ulta Lab Tests

Ulta Lab Tests is your place to go for female infertility tests.
Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable, so you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are a few great things to love about Ulta Lab Tests:

  • You will get secure and confidential results.
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  • You don't need a physician's referral.
  • We offer affordable pricing with 100% satisfaction guaranteed.

Order your lab tests for infertility today, and your results will be provided to you securely and confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours.

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