Estradiol Most Popular

The Estradiol test contains 1 test with 1 biomarker.

Brief Description: The Estradiol test measures the levels of estradiol, which is the most potent form of estrogen, in the blood. Estradiol plays a vital role in the development and maintenance of female reproductive organs and secondary sexual characteristics. The Estradiol test provides valuable information about hormonal balance and helps diagnose and monitor conditions related to estrogen levels.

This test is not intended for patients under the age of 18 years old. For patients under 18 years old, order Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS #30289. If Estradiol #4021 is ordered for a patient under 18, the lab will automatically change the code to and charge for Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS #30289.

Also Known As: E2 Test, Estrogen 2 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

Note: For any patients for whom low estradiol levels are anticipated (e.g. males, pre-pubertal children and hypogonadal/post-menopausal females), the Estradiol, Ultrasensitive, LC/MS/MS #30289 assay is recommended.

Important: This test can reflex to Estradiol, Ultrasensitive, LC/MS/MS #30289 if ordered for a male patient and the measured Estradiol result is low.

When is an Estradiol test ordered?

An Estradiol test may be ordered in several situations to assess estrogen levels:

  1. Evaluation of Menstrual Irregularities: When women experience irregular menstrual cycles, fertility issues, or symptoms associated with hormonal imbalances, an Estradiol test helps assess estrogen levels and identify potential causes.

  2. Monitoring Hormone Replacement Therapy: For women undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to manage menopausal symptoms or other conditions, the Estradiol test is ordered to monitor and adjust hormone dosage as needed.

  3. Assessment of Puberty Development: In adolescents, the Estradiol test may be ordered to evaluate the onset and progression of puberty and ensure normal hormonal development.

  4. Evaluation of Reproductive Disorders: The test helps in diagnosing and monitoring conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, ovarian tumors, or certain fertility issues related to estrogen imbalance.

What does an Estradiol blood test check for?

Estradiol, or E2, is a component of Estrogen that is present in the blood. For women, Estradiol is something that should be produced naturally, and the body produces larger amounts of Estradiol during puberty and it fluctuates throughout the menstrual cycle. Estradiol is most prominent in women of reproductive age. Low levels are common in girls who have not yet had their first menstrual cycle and in women after their reproductive age.

Lab tests often ordered with an Estradiol test:

Depending on the clinical scenario, various tests may be ordered alongside an estradiol test to give a more complete hormonal profile or to understand the underlying causes of symptoms. Here are some tests that may be ordered:

  1. Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH):

    • Purpose: FSH stimulates the growth of ovarian follicles in the ovary before the release of an egg at ovulation.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate ovarian reserve and function, particularly in the assessment of infertility or menopause.
  2. Luteinizing Hormone (LH):

    • Purpose: LH works with FSH to ensure normal functioning of the ovaries and testes and plays a key role in signaling ovulation.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To investigate menstrual irregularities, infertility issues, or the onset of menopause.
  3. Progesterone:

    • Purpose: Progesterone prepares the uterine lining for pregnancy after ovulation and regulates the menstrual cycle.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To help determine if ovulation is occurring or to monitor hormone replacement therapy.
  4. Testosterone:

    • Purpose: While considered a male hormone, testosterone also plays a role in female health and is produced in the ovaries and adrenal glands.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To diagnose polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), other forms of adrenal or ovarian hyperandrogenism, and to evaluate sexual dysfunction.
  5. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG):

    • Purpose: SHBG is a protein that binds to sex hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol, to transport them in the blood.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate excess or deficient sex hormone levels and to understand how many hormones are available for the body to use.
  6. Prolactin:

    • Purpose: Prolactin is a hormone that promotes breast milk production and can affect menstrual function.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To check for prolactinoma or other conditions associated with high prolactin levels, which can interfere with estrogen production and reproductive functions.
  7. Thyroid Function Tests (TSH, Free T3, Free T4):

    • Purpose: The thyroid hormones are essential for overall metabolic function and can affect menstrual cycles and fertility.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To determine if thyroid dysfunction is contributing to symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles, infertility, or menopausal symptoms.
  8. Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH):

    • Purpose: AMH is produced by ovarian follicles and is a marker of ovarian reserve.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess a woman’s remaining egg supply or in the evaluation of conditions such as PCOS.
  9. Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate (DHEA-S):

    • Purpose: DHEA-S is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is a precursor to estrogens and androgens.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate adrenal gland function and to detect adrenal tumors or hyperplasia.
  10. 17-Hydroxyprogesterone:

    • Purpose: This steroid hormone is produced during the synthesis of cortisol and can be elevated in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).
    • Why Is It Ordered: To screen for and monitor CAH, which can lead to symptoms of hormone imbalance and affect normal reproductive function.

These tests are typically ordered to pinpoint the cause of abnormal menstrual cycles, infertility, suspected hormonal imbalances, or to monitor hormone therapy. The specific tests chosen will depend on the individual's medical history, symptoms, and what the healthcare provider is trying to diagnose or monitor.

Conditions where an Estradiol test is recommended:

An Estradiol test is commonly ordered for:

  1. Menstrual Irregularities: Women experiencing irregular menstrual cycles, absent periods, or other menstrual abnormalities may require an Estradiol test to evaluate estrogen levels and identify potential causes.

  2. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Women undergoing HRT, especially during menopause, require regular Estradiol tests to monitor estrogen levels and ensure appropriate hormone dosage.

  3. Reproductive Disorders: Conditions such as PCOS, endometriosis, ovarian tumors, or fertility issues related to estrogen imbalance may necessitate Estradiol testing for diagnosis and monitoring.

How does my healthcare provider use an Estradiol test?

Healthcare providers use the results of an Estradiol test to:

  1. Assess Hormonal Balance: Estradiol test results provide insights into hormonal balance, particularly estrogen levels, and help healthcare providers evaluate the function of the reproductive system.

  2. Diagnose and Monitor Reproductive Disorders: Abnormal estradiol levels can assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of conditions such as PCOS, endometriosis, or certain fertility issues, allowing for appropriate treatment and management.

  3. Monitor Hormone Replacement Therapy: In women receiving HRT, Estradiol test results guide healthcare providers in adjusting hormone dosage to maintain optimal estrogen levels and alleviate menopausal symptoms.

By effectively utilizing the results of an Estradiol test, healthcare providers can assess hormonal balance, diagnose and monitor reproductive disorders, and make informed decisions regarding patient care and treatment interventions related to estrogen levels.

What do my Estradiol test results mean?

Estradiol is one of the three Estrogens that have a large impact on the women's body throughout the menstrual cycle. When these hormones are too high or too low, it could cause irregular bleeding, infertility, complications with menopause, and delayed or premature puberty. Out of range levels can also be indicative of an ovarian condition such as PCOS. It is important to note that these values will fluctuate throughout a woman's cycle. The Estrogen hormones work together and if one is out of range, the others may also be out of range. It is recommended to follow up with a licensed healthcare professional to determine the best treatment if need.

Most Common Questions About the Estradiol Test:

Understanding the Test

What is an Estradiol test?

An Estradiol test measures the amount of estradiol, a form of estrogen, in your blood. Estradiol is the primary sex hormone in women and plays a key role in female reproductive system including the menstrual cycle and fertility. In men, estradiol also plays a role in sexual function.

Why might someone need an Estradiol test?

Doctors might order an estradiol test for several reasons, such as: assessing ovarian function, understanding reasons for changes in menstrual cycles, evaluating fertility issues, or monitoring treatment for infertility. It can also be used to evaluate menopausal symptoms or to diagnose conditions related to the endocrine system, like tumors or gynecomastia in men.

Can an Estradiol test determine menopause?

While estradiol levels do decrease during menopause, the diagnosis of menopause is typically based on the absence of menstrual periods for 12 months. An estradiol test can help provide additional information about hormonal changes and confirm a diagnosis of menopause.

Test Results and Interpretation

What do the results of an Estradiol test mean?

Estradiol levels can vary widely and depend on a person's age, sex, and stage of menstrual cycle or menopause. Higher levels could indicate an ovarian tumor in women or gynecomastia in men. Lower levels might indicate menopause, poor ovarian function, or Turner syndrome.

Can the Estradiol test help in understanding fertility issues?

Yes, estradiol levels are often evaluated as part of a workup for women experiencing difficulty getting pregnant because it plays a critical role in ovulation, conception, and maintaining a pregnancy.

What do low Estradiol test results imply?

Low levels of estradiol in women could suggest menopause, Turner syndrome, or issues with ovarian function. In men, levels are typically lower than in women, but excessively low levels could indicate hypothalamic or pituitary disease.

What do high Estradiol test results imply?

High levels in women could indicate early puberty, tumors in the ovaries, or high levels of stress. In men, it could suggest gynecomastia, excessive use of alcohol, or tumors in the adrenal glands.

What does it mean if my Estradiol test results are in the borderline range?

Estradiol levels can fluctuate depending on various factors, including the phase of the menstrual cycle. If your results are borderline, your doctor may recommend repeating the test at a different time or may consider the results along with other information to make a diagnosis.

Considerations and Risks

Is there a risk of overdiagnosis with the Estradiol test?

The risk of overdiagnosis is generally low. Estradiol levels alone can't diagnose a condition but can provide valuable information. The interpretation of estradiol levels should always be done in the context of a person's symptoms, medical history, and other test results.

Are there any risks associated with an Estradiol test?

The Estradiol test itself has minimal risks, associated with blood draw procedures such as slight pain or bruising at the injection site. The interpretation of the results and subsequent steps carry more potential risks, as they may lead to further testing or treatments.

Can the Estradiol test be done at home?

Our Estradiol test is performed in a clinical laboratory. Mobile phlebotomy options are available in select areas. Simply check out Patient Service Center locator.

How does one prepare for the Estradiol test?

The Estradiol test does not typically require specific preparation. However, the timing of the test may be crucial, particularly in pre-menopausal women, as estradiol levels can fluctuate during the menstrual cycle. Your doctor will provide specific instructions based on your situation.

Are there medications that can affect the results of an Estradiol test?

Yes, certain medications can affect estradiol levels. These include antibiotics, corticosteroids, estrogen or testosterone medications, and some psychotropic drugs. If you are taking these medications, it's important to inform your doctor.

Clinical Implications

Can the Estradiol test help in the diagnosis of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)?

While the estradiol test alone cannot diagnose PCOS, it can be a part of the larger diagnostic process. Women with PCOS often have elevated levels of estradiol due to increased production by the ovaries.

Can an Estradiol test diagnose ovarian cancer?

An estradiol test isn't used alone to diagnose ovarian cancer. However, high levels can indicate ovarian tumors, and the test can be useful in conjunction with other tests and evaluations to diagnose ovarian cancer.

How can the Estradiol test be useful for individuals undergoing Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT)?

Estradiol tests are often used to monitor and adjust dosages for individuals undergoing hormone replacement therapy (HRT), including trans women. Regular monitoring helps ensure that hormone levels are in the desired range to minimize side effects and maximize benefits.

Can the Estradiol test help in assessing puberty status in children?

Yes, an Estradiol test can help determine whether children are entering puberty earlier or later than expected. High levels in girls can indicate the onset of puberty, while low levels in boys can suggest delayed puberty.

How can an Estradiol test be used in the treatment of infertility?

Estradiol levels are often evaluated during fertility treatments such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) to determine the best time for egg retrieval. The levels can also indicate the quality of the ovarian response and the likelihood of a successful pregnancy.

How does age affect the interpretation of Estradiol test results?

Estradiol levels change with age. In females, levels rise during puberty, fluctuate during menstrual cycles, and decrease significantly after menopause. In males, levels tend to remain steady after puberty.

Can an Estradiol test be used to monitor treatment for estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer?

Yes, in cases of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer, estradiol levels are often monitored during treatment because these cancers grow in response to estrogen. Treatments aim to lower estrogen levels in the body, and regular testing can help assess the effectiveness of the treatment.

What other tests might a healthcare provider order along with an Estradiol test?

Other tests related to reproductive and endocrine health may be ordered along with the Estradiol test, including Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH), Progesterone, and Testosterone.

Is an Estradiol test effective for diagnosing endometriosis?

Estradiol levels alone cannot diagnose endometriosis, but they can contribute to understanding the overall hormonal picture in individuals with symptoms suggestive of endometriosis.

How does body weight impact Estradiol levels in the body?

Obesity can lead to higher estradiol levels in both men and women because body fat can convert other hormones into estradiol. This can potentially lead to a hormonalimbalance.

Can the Estradiol test be used to diagnose osteoporosis?

An Estradiol test is not typically used to diagnose osteoporosis, but low levels of estradiol can contribute to the development of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women because estradiol plays a key role in maintaining bone health.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Estradiol

Estradiol (estradiol-17 beta, E2) is part of an estrogen that is a group of steroids that regulate the menstrual cycle and function as the main female sex hormones. Estrogens are responsible for the development of female sex organs and secondary sex characteristics and are tied to the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. They are considered the main sex hormones in women and are present in small quantities in men. Estradiol (E2) is the predominant form of estrogen and is produced primarily in the ovaries with additional amounts produced by the adrenal glands in women and in the testes and adrenal glands in men. Estradiol levels are used in evaluating ovarian function. Estradiol levels are increased in cases of early (precocious) puberty in girls and gynecomastia in men. Its main use has been in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhea – for example, to determine whether the cause is menopause, pregnancy, or a medical problem. In assisted reproductive technology (ART), serial measurements are used to monitor follicle development in the ovary in the days prior to in vitro fertilization. Estradiol is also sometimes used to monitor menopausal hormone replacement therapy.
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Customer Reviews