DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone), Unconjugated, LC/MS/MS

The DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone), Unconjugated, LC/MS/MS test contains 1 test with 1 biomarker.

Brief Description: The DHEA Unconjugated test measures the level of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in the blood. DHEA is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands, and it serves as a precursor to other sex hormones, including testosterone and estrogen. This test helps evaluate the production of DHEA and its potential impact on various body functions.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When and Why a DHEA Unconjugated Test May Be Ordered:

A healthcare provider may order a DHEA Unconjugated test under the following circumstances:

  1. Hormonal Imbalance: When patients exhibit symptoms of hormonal imbalance, such as irregular menstrual cycles, abnormal hair growth (hirsutism), or virilization in females, or low libido and infertility in males, a DHEA Unconjugated test can be useful in understanding potential underlying causes.

  2. Adrenal Gland Function: Since DHEA is primarily produced by the adrenal glands, this test can help assess their function and detect adrenal disorders, such as adrenal insufficiency or adrenal tumors.

  3. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): PCOS is a common endocrine disorder in women, and elevated DHEA levels can be associated with this condition. The test can aid in the diagnosis and management of PCOS.

  4. Evaluation of Androgen Excess: In cases of excessive androgen levels, especially in women, a DHEA Unconjugated test may be used to determine the source of androgen production and guide appropriate treatment.

What a DHEA Unconjugated Test Checks For:

The DHEA Unconjugated test measures the level of DHEA in the blood. DHEA is produced by the adrenal glands and plays a crucial role in the synthesis of other sex hormones, particularly androgens and estrogens. This test provides insight into the production of DHEA and its potential impact on hormonal balance.

Other Lab Tests That May Be Ordered Alongside a DHEA Unconjugated Test:

When a DHEA Unconjugated test is ordered, it's often part of a broader evaluation of adrenal gland function and hormonal balance. Here are some tests commonly ordered alongside it:

  1. DHEA Sulfate (DHEA-S):

    • Purpose: To measure the sulfate ester of DHEA, which is a more stable and abundant form in the circulation.
    • Why Is It Ordered: DHEA-S levels provide additional information about adrenal function and are often used in conjunction with DHEA to assess adrenal health.
  2. Cortisol:

    • Purpose: To measure cortisol levels in the blood, saliva, or urine.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Cortisol is another important hormone produced by the adrenal glands, and its levels can help assess adrenal gland function, particularly in the context of conditions like Cushing's syndrome or Addison's disease.
  3. Androstenedione:

    • Purpose: To measure the level of androstenedione, a steroid hormone that serves as a precursor to sex hormones.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate the production of androgens by the adrenal glands and ovaries/testes, and to help diagnose conditions associated with androgen excess or deficiency.
  4. Testosterone (Total and Free):

    • Purpose: To measure the level of testosterone in the blood.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess testosterone levels, which can be influenced by adrenal hormones, and to evaluate conditions related to excess or deficient androgen levels.
  5. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG):

    • Purpose: To measure the level of SHBG, a protein that binds to sex hormones.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To help understand the availability of free (biologically active) hormones like testosterone and estrogen in the body.
  6. 17-Hydroxyprogesterone:

    • Purpose: To measure the level of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, a precursor to cortisol.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate adrenal gland function and to help diagnose congenital adrenal hyperplasia.
  7. Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH):

    • Purpose: To measure levels of LH and FSH, which are important for reproductive health.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess the function of the ovaries or testes and to evaluate menstrual irregularities or fertility issues.
  8. Complete Blood Count (CBC) and Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP):

    • Purpose: To provide a broad picture of overall health.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess general health status and to rule out other health conditions that might affect hormonal balance or adrenal function.

These tests, when ordered alongside a Dehydroepiandrosterone Unconjugated test, provide a comprehensive view of an individual’s adrenal function and hormonal balance. They are crucial for diagnosing and managing conditions like adrenal hyperplasia, adrenal tumors, and disorders of sex hormone metabolism. The specific combination of tests will depend on the individual’s symptoms, medical history, and the results of initial screenings.

Conditions or Diseases That Would Require a DHEA Unconjugated Test:

A DHEA Unconjugated test is useful in diagnosing and managing various conditions related to hormonal imbalances and adrenal function, including:

  1. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): Elevated DHEA levels may be seen in women with PCOS, a condition characterized by irregular menstrual cycles, ovarian cysts, and excess androgen production.

  2. Adrenal Insufficiency: In cases of adrenal insufficiency, the adrenal glands do not produce adequate amounts of hormones, including DHEA.

  3. Adrenal Tumors: Certain adrenal tumors, such as adrenal adenomas or carcinomas, can lead to abnormal DHEA production.

How Health Care Providers Use the Results of a DHEA Unconjugated Test:

The results of a DHEA Unconjugated test are used by healthcare providers to:

  1. Diagnose Hormonal Imbalances: Abnormal DHEA levels can indicate hormonal imbalances and help guide further investigations to determine the underlying cause.

  2. Monitor Hormone Replacement Therapy: For patients undergoing hormone replacement therapy, DHEA testing can help ensure proper dosing and effectiveness of treatment.

  3. Assess Adrenal Gland Function: DHEA levels are closely related to adrenal gland function, so abnormal results can aid in the diagnosis and management of adrenal disorders.

In summary, the DHEA Unconjugated test is a valuable tool in assessing hormonal imbalances, adrenal function, and conditions related to androgen and estrogen production. It is frequently used in the evaluation of conditions such as PCOS, adrenal insufficiency, and adrenal tumors. The results of this test play a crucial role in guiding treatment decisions and optimizing hormonal balance in patients.

Most Common Questions About the DHEA Unconjugated test:

Understanding the DHEA Unconjugated Test

What is the DHEA Unconjugated test?

The DHEA Unconjugated test is a blood test that measures the amount of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in your blood. DHEA is a hormone that's produced by your adrenal glands, and it serves as a precursor to male and female sex hormones, including estrogen and testosterone.

Why is the DHEA Unconjugated test ordered?

The DHEA Unconjugated test is often ordered to evaluate the function of the adrenal glands and to help diagnose conditions related to an imbalance of hormones, such as adrenal tumors, adrenal insufficiency, Cushing's syndrome, and certain forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

How does the DHEA Unconjugated test contribute to understanding my overall health?

The DHEA Unconjugated test provides information about your hormone balance, which can be indicative of your overall health. Hormones play an essential role in a variety of bodily functions, so an imbalance can affect many aspects of your health.

Interpreting DHEA Unconjugated Test Results

What does a high DHEA level indicate in the DHEA Unconjugated test?

A high DHEA level in the DHEA Unconjugated test may indicate an adrenal tumor, adrenal hyperplasia, or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). It can also occur in some cases of cancer, particularly those involving the adrenal glands.

What does a low DHEA level indicate in the DHEA Unconjugated test?

A low DHEA level may indicate adrenal insufficiency or dysfunction. This can occur due to conditions such as Addison's disease or hypopituitarism.

What is considered a normal DHEA level in the DHEA Unconjugated test?

Normal DHEA levels can vary widely depending on age and sex. DHEA levels tend to peak in early adulthood and gradually decrease with age. It's best to discuss what would be considered a normal range for you with your healthcare provider.

DHEA Unconjugated Test and Specific Health Conditions

How is the DHEA Unconjugated test used in diagnosing adrenal diseases?

The DHEA Unconjugated test can be used as part of the diagnostic process for adrenal diseases. Elevated DHEA levels can indicate conditions such as adrenal tumors or hyperplasia, while low levels can indicate adrenal insufficiency.

How does the DHEA Unconjugated test help in managing hormonal imbalances?

For individuals with hormonal imbalances, regular DHEA testing can help monitor the effectiveness of treatment and make necessary adjustments.

Can the DHEA Unconjugated test be used to diagnose other health conditions?

Yes, the DHEA Unconjugated test can help diagnose other health conditions that affect hormone levels, such as PCOS and certain types of cancer.

DHEA Unconjugated Test and Treatment Monitoring

How is the DHEA Unconjugated test used to monitor treatment effectiveness?

The DHEA Unconjugated test can be used to monitor how well treatment is working for conditions that affect hormone levels. If levels come back to normal or near normal after treatment, it's usually a sign that the treatment is working.

How frequently should the DHEA Unconjugated test be repeated?

The frequency of DHEA Unconjugated testing depends on the individual and the specific condition being monitored. This is something that should be discussed with your healthcare provider.

Clinical Guidelines and Recommendations

What are the guidelines for using the DHEA Unconjugated test in clinical practice?

The DHEA Unconjugated test is typically used when adrenal gland disorders are suspected. It's also sometimes used to evaluate women who are showing signs of virilization, such as excessive hair growth, or when a woman has irregular menstrual periods and an evaluation for PCOS is being done.

Can the DHEA Unconjugated test be used in preventive health check-ups?

The DHEA Unconjugated test is not typically used as part of a routine health check-up. It's usually ordered when specific symptoms or conditions warrant it.

DHEA Unconjugated Test and Other Diagnostic Tools

How does the DHEA Unconjugated test relate to other hormone tests?

The DHEA Unconjugated test is often performed along with other hormone tests, such as those for cortisol, testosterone, and estrogen, to give a more comprehensive view of an individual's hormonal health.

What other tests might be done alongside the DHEA Unconjugated test?

Other tests that might be done alongside the DHEA Unconjugated test can include tests for cortisol, testosterone, and estrogen. These tests can provide additional information about an individual's hormonal health.

Patient Considerations

What should I do if my DHEA levels are abnormal in the DHEA Unconjugated test?

If your DHEA levels are abnormal, it's important to talk with your healthcare provider about what this might mean for your health. They may recommend further testing or treatment depending on your symptoms and other test results.

Can lifestyle changes affect the results of the DHEA Unconjugated test?

Yes, lifestyle changes such as stress reduction, improved diet, and regular exercise can potentially affect your DHEA levels and thereby the results of the DHEA Unconjugated test.

What factors can affect DHEA Unconjugated test results?

Certain factors can affect the results of the DHEA Unconjugated test, including stress, illness, and the use of certain medications.

Advances in DHEA Unconjugated Testing

Have there been any recent advances in DHEA Unconjugated testing?

While the testing methods for DHEA have remained fairly consistent, there have been advances in our understanding of the role of DHEA in the body and how it relates to various health conditions.

How can the DHEA Unconjugated test results aid in personalized medicine?

The DHEA Unconjugated test results can aid in personalized medicine by providing information about an individual's hormone balance. This can be useful in tailoring treatments for hormonal imbalances and related conditions.

Patient Engagement and Communication

How can I discuss my DHEA Unconjugated test results with my healthcare provider?

When discussing your DHEA Unconjugated test results with your healthcare provider, it can be helpful to ask questions about what the results mean for your health, any further tests you might need, and possible treatment options.

How can I be more involved in understanding my DHEA Unconjugated test results?

Being proactive about your health is important. Asking questions, doing your own research, and taking steps to maintain a healthy lifestyle can all contribute to understanding your DHEA Unconjugated test results.

How do DHEA Unconjugated test results fit into my broader health history?

The DHEA Unconjugated test results provide information about your current hormone balance, which can be influenced by various factors including age, sex, stress, and illness. When interpreted alongside your broader health history and other test results, these results can provide insight into your overall health status.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: DHEA Dehydroepiandrosterone Unconjugated LCMSMS

DHEA, LC/MS/MS

DHEA-sulfate test measures the amount of DHEA-sulfate in the blood. DHEA-sulfate is a weak male hormone (androgen) produced by the adrenal gland in both men and women. This test is done to check the function of the adrenal glands. The adrenal gland is one of the major sources of androgens in women. The DHEA-sulfate test is often done in women who have male body characteristics (virilism) or excessive hair growth (hirsutism). It is also done in children who are maturing too early (precocious puberty).
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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