Erectile Dysfunction (ED)

Find and order the right erectile dysfunction tests with Ulta Lab Tests, used by Urologists, to diagnose ED.  Get tested locally and get an accurate reading of your results sent confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours. Order from Ulta Lab Tests today! 


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DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.


DHT is a potent androgen derived from testosterone via 5-alpha-reductase activity. 5-alpha-reductase deficiency results in incompletely virilized males (phenotypic females). This diagnosis is supported by an elevated ratio of testosterone to DHT.



Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Hormone Panel

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS [ 90567 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Prolactin [ 746 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Hormone Panel 3

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS [ 90567 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Pregnenolone, LC/MS/MS [ 31493 ]
  • Prolactin [ 746 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel 2

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • Prolactin 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel 3

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • Pregnenolone, LC/MS/MS
  • Prolactin 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

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Measuring the circulating levels of estradiol is important for assessing the ovarian function and monitoring follicular development for assisted reproduction protocols. Estradiol plays an essential role throughout the human menstrual cycle. Elevated estradiol levels in females may also result from primary or secondary ovarian hyperfunction. Very high estradiol levels are found during the induction of ovulation for assisted reproduction therapy or in pregnancy. Decreased estradiol levels in females may result from either lack of ovarian synthesis (primary ovarian hypofunction and menopause) or a lesion in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis (secondary ovarian hypofunction). Elevated estradiol levels in males may be due to increased aromatization of androgens, resulting in gynecomastia.

IMPORTANT - Note this Estradiol test is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute in Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS - #30289 at an additional charge of $34


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FSH and LH are secreted by the anterior pituitary in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) secreted by the hypothalamus. In both males and females, FSH and LH secretion is regulated by a balance of positive and negative feedback mechanisms involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the reproductive organs, and the pituitary and sex steroid hormones. FSH and LH play a critical role in maintaining the normal function of the male and female reproductive systems. Abnormal FSH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of LH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased FSH levels are associated with menopause and primary ovarian hypofunction in females and primary hypogonadism in males. Decreased levels of FSH are associated with primary ovarian hyper-function in females and primary hypergonadism in males. Normal or decreased levels of FSH are associated with polycystic ovary disease in females. In males, LH is also called interstitial cell-stimulating hormone (ICSH). Abnormal LH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of FSH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased LH levels are associated with menopause, primary ovarian hypofunction, and polycystic ovary disease in females and primary hypo-gonadism in males. Decreased LH levels are associated with primary ovarian hyperfunction in females and primary hyper-gonadism in males.

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Serum glucose levels may be abnormally high (hyperglycemia) or abnormally low (hypoglycemia). Glucose measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of carbohydrate metabolic disorders including diabetes mellitus, idiopathic hypoglycemia, and pancreatic islet cell neoplasm.

A Hemoglobin (Hb) A1c Blood Test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood. The A1c test will help determine whether you are at a higher risk of developing diabetes; to help diagnose diabetes and prediabetes; to monitor diabetes and to aid in treatment decisions.

To assist with control of blood glucose levels, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended glycated hemoglobin testing (HbA1c) twice a year for patients with stable glycemia, and quarterly for patients with poor glucose control. Interpretative ranges are based on ADA guidelines.


Assesses long term diabetic control in diabetes mellitus.

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Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, or somatomedin C), a protein involved in stimulating somatic growth, is regulated principally by growth hormone (GH) and nutritional intake. IGF-I is transported in serum by several proteins; this helps maintain relatively high IGF-I plasma levels and minimizes fluctuations in serum IGF-I concentrations. Measuring IGF-I is useful in several growth-related disorders. Dwarfism caused by deficiency of growth hormone (hypopituitarism) results in decreased serum levels of IGF-I, while acromegaly (growth hormone excess) results in elevated levels of IGF-I. IGF-I measurements are also helpful in assessing nutritional status; levels are reduced in undernutrition and restored with a proper diet.

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Pregnenolone is a chemical substance that is a precursor to all steroid hormones. This test measures the amount of pregnenolone in the blood in order to help detect rare forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

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During pregnancy and postpartum lactation, serum prolactin can increase 10- to 20-fold. Exercise, stress, and sleep also cause transient increases in prolactin levels. Consistently elevated serum prolactin levels (>30 ng/mL), in the absence of pregnancy and postpartum lactation, are indicative of hyperprolactinemia. Hypersecretion of prolactin can be caused by pituitary adenomas, hypothalamic disease, breast or chest wall stimulation, renal failure or hypothyroidism. A number of drugs, including many antidepressants, are also common causes of abnormally elevated prolactin levels. Hyperprolactinemia often results in galactorrhea, amenorrhea, and infertility in females, and in impotence and hypogonadism in males. Renal failure, hypothyroidism, and prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas are also common causes of abnormally elevated prolactin levels.

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Elevated serum PSA concentrations have been reported in men with prostate cancer, benign prostatic hypertrophy, and inflammatory conditions of the prostate.

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This test is used to diagnose hyperthyroidism and to clarify thyroid status in the presence of a possible protein binding abnormality.

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The free T4 are tests thelps evaluate thyroid function. The free T4 test is used to help diagnose hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Free T4 is the active form of thyroxine and is usually ordered along with or following a TSH test. This helps the doctor to determine whether the thyroid hormone feedback system is functioning as it should, and the results of the tests help to distinguish between different causes of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

Helpful in assessing testicular function in prepubescent hypogonadal males and in managing hirsutism, virilization in females

This is an uncapped test. Reference ranges above 1100 ng/dL can be reported with a quantitative result.


Testosterone circulates almost entirely bound to transport proteins: normally less than 1% is free. Measurement of Free Testosterone may be useful when disturbances in Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) are suspected such as when patients are obese or have excessive estrogen. Testosterone measurements are used to assess erectile dysfunction, infertility, gynecomastia, and osteoporosis and to assess hormone replacement therapy.


This test is useful in the differential diagnosis of male hypogonadism. For males 18 years of age and older only. Pediatric and Female patients will need to order Testosterone, Total, MS #15983.

Please note: If Testosterone, Total, Males (Adult) Only #873 is ordered for a pediatric or female patient, the lab will automatically change the test to and charge for Testosterone, Total, MS #15983.



Erectile dysfunction (ED) is an issue that plagues far too many men in the United States. In fact, more than 30 million men are currently struggling with ED.

Beyond its physical implications, ED puts a significant mental burden on men. It can also lead to marital strife as ED hinders a couple’s sex life.

The good news is that there are erectile dysfunction tests to help identify the issue. With a solid diagnosis, doctors can prescribe the proper ED treatments to solve the issue.

Read on to learn all about ED tests. Explore how an ED lab test can confirm the existence of an issue and lead to its resolution.

What Is Erectile Dysfunction?

Before diving into the various ED tests, it is important to define this medical condition. With ED, a male cannot get or maintain an erection. ED has a significant impact on sexual intercourse as the male now has difficulty satisfying his partner.

Some patients with ED cannot get an erection at all. Others get an erection initially, but it goes away during sexual intercourse, causing issues for their partner. Another group of men get an erection sometimes, but other times are unable to.

Patients with ED often schedule an appointment with their primary care physician. A urologist is another doctor that treats men with ED.

These doctors prescribe an ED lab test to verify the presence of an issue. A separate issue may cause a patient's ED, and the doctors will investigate all possibilities.

What Are the Causes of Erectile Dysfunction?

Many people associate ED with older men. They think that this is a common issue with aging men.

However, the truth is that ED is not a normal part of the aging process. In fact, ED can plague men in any age group.

Taking certain medications or other supplements can lead to ED. Your doctor will certainly assess your current medication to determine if there is a link to ED.

Particular behaviors are also known to cause ED. Obesity and smoking tobacco are two known causes of ED.

There are various medical conditions and diseases that lead to ED. Your doctor will ask about your medical history to look for potential causes. Even psychological or emotional conditions can directly cause ED.

The end result is not good for patients with ED. The effects go well beyond having a positive sex life.

Patients with ED suffer from low self-esteem and depression resulting from their condition. Naturally, ED patients have fertility issues and it often causes emotional duress when a couple cannot get pregnant.

How Is Erectile Dysfunction Diagnosed?

As stated earlier, the doctor is going to ask about your medical history. They are interested in what medicines you take, prior surgeries, and conditions you are dealing with. Additionally, your doctor will ask about your family history to see if there is a potential genetic linkage.

The doctor is certainly going to inquire about your sex life. This is a time to embrace honesty so that the doctor can figure out what is going on.

A physical examination by the doctor follows. Of course, examination of the testicles and penis is part of this process. The doctor also looks for hair loss and breast size. The latter two signs may indicate a hormonal imbalance.

Checking your pulse at the wrists is a common part of the physical examination. The doctor wants to make sure that blood is flowing properly to your extremities.

Listening to your heartbeat for any abnormalities and checking blood pressure are also important steps. Any cardiovascular issues may be the root cause behind ED.

Lab tests of your blood and urine are on deck. These lab tests yield clues to what is causing ED.

For example, your lab results may indicate issues like heart disease or diabetes. These conditions, along with kidney disease, are common root causes of ED. Your doctor also looks for hormonal imbalances that may trigger ED.

Thyroid operation is another possibility that the doctors check for using blood work. The thyroid is critical for the flow of sex hormones. If it is not working properly, it may be difficult to get an erection.

What Are Some Other Erectile Dysfunction Tests?

The doctor may want to run some additional tests. There are several different tests to confirm the presence of ED.

Men get several erections per night when they are sleeping. Your doctor may ask to perform an overnight erection test. This involves wearing a device that measures the strength and frequency of your nightly erections. If you are still getting erections at night, it suggests your ED issues are rooted in mental or emotional issues.

The doctor may call for an intracavernosal test. This is where the doctor injects medicine into the base of the penis to check for an erection. Failure to get an erection means there is a blood flow issue. Lastly, the doctor may want to do an ultrasound, which is another proven method to check for blood flow.

What Are the Benefits of Lab Tests for Erectile Dysfunction?

There are many benefits to going for erectile dysfunction lab tests. For starters, the results are secure and confidential. No one, not even your partner, has access to the results unless you grant it.

At our lab, you do not even need a doctor’s prescription or referral. You can get ED lab results directly if you do not want to involve your primary care physician.

Another benefit to our testing is that you do not need health insurance. The testing is affordable and 100% satisfaction is guaranteed. The results are available to the patient in no more than 48 hours.

How Can ED Tests Get You Back on Track Today?

ED tests are the most effective way to get your personal life back on track. Here, you can confirm the issue and determine what the root cause is. Whether it is a medical condition or mentally induced, knowing the root cause is key to fixing it.

If you are interested in getting erectile dysfunction tests, we offer a selection of Erectile Dysfunction (ED) panels that include lab tests and biomarkers to evaluate if they are out of balance.