Vasculitis

Order a vasculitis blood test to evaluate your blood cell count to tell whether you have enough red blood cells and look for certain antibodies, such as the anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) test to help diagnose vasculitis from Ulta Lab Tests. Learn about your health today!


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Reference Range(s)

  • ADMA (Asymmetric dimethylarginine)<100 ng/mL 
  • SDMA (Symmetric dimethylarginine)73-135 ng/mL

Clinical Significance

ADMA and SDMA may be measured in individuals with multiple risk factors for the development of cardiovascular disease


Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, as well as other autoimmune diseases.

Additional test processing fees will be charged if initial results dictate Reflex (further) testing.


Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA and/or atypical P-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, as well as other autoimmune diseases.

Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases (e.g., crescentic glomerulonephritis, microscopic polyarteritis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), bowel disease (Crohn's Disease, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis) as well as with other autoimmune diseases (drug-induced lupus, SLE, Felty's syndrome). ANCA has classically been divided into C-ANCA and P-ANCA depending on the immunofluorescent pattern observed. More recently the specific antigens responsible for these patterns have been described and isolated. The antigen that gives the C-ANCA pattern is proteinase-3 (PR-3). Multiple antigens are responsible for P-ANCA pattern, the principle antigen being myeloperoxidase (MPO). Patients with vascular diseases will generally have either a C-ANCA pattern or P-ANCA pattern, and give positive results in specific tests for PR-3 or MPO. Patients with bowel disease have been shown to have antibodies that give a P-ANCA or C-ANCA pattern. These antibodies however, may not be directed towards MPO. Patients with drug induced lupus, etc., often present with a P-ANCA pattern that is associated with antibodies against MPO.

This test is useful in evaluating patients presenting with sarcoidosis, Gaucher's disease and lymphoangiomyomatosis in that the enzyme is increased in these clinical settings.

This assay is intended for the qualitative determination of angiotensin converting enzyme gene insertion/deletion polymorphism and should be performed on the people who are at risk for coronary events and restenosis after precutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.

Cardio IQ® Myeloperoxidase (MPO)

Clinical Significance

Myeloperoxidase testing may be used for individuals with multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease, or those with established disease.

The test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by Cleveland HeartLab, Inc. 

Performing Laboratory 

Cleveland HeartLab, Inc 

6701 Carnegie Avenue, Suite 500

Cleveland, OH 44103-4623

 


Decreased C3 and C4 levels may be associated with acute glomerulonephritis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, immune complex disease, active systemic lupus erythematosis, cryoglobulinemia, congenital C4 deficiency and generalized autoimmune disease

These studies contribute to the diagnosis of autoimmune blistering diseases, dermatitis herpetiformis, and IgA vasculitis. Important in the evaluation of other autoimmune and inflammatory skin diseases including non-IgA vasculitides and interface and lichenoid dermatitis/mucositis such as connective tissue disorders, lichen planus, etc. The panel includes the C5b-9 antibody to better distinguish between some forms of Lupus and Dermatomyocitis. Its presence or absence is also critical in the evaluation of other types of connective tissue diseases and many vasculitides.


Patients with vascular diseases will generally have either a C-ANCA pattern or P-ANCA pattern, and give positive results in specific tests for PR-3 or MPO. Patients with bowel disease have been shown to have antibodies that give a P-ANCA or C-ANCA pattern. These antibodies, however, may not be directed toward MPO. Patients with drug induced lupus, etc., often present with a P-ANCA pattern that is associated with antibodies against MPO.

Phosphatidylserine antibody is used to assist in the diagnosis, management, and possible prevention of thrombotic complications as part of the Phospholipid Syndrome.


Clinical Significance

Laboratory testing for Antiphospholipid Antibody is useful in assisting in the diagnosis, management, and possible prevention of thrombotic complications. More specifically, evaluation of Antiphosphatidylserine IgA, IgG, and IgM may be potentially useful in this context.


Patients with vascular diseases will generally have either a C-ANCA pattern or P-ANCA pattern, and give positive results in specific tests for PR-3 or MPO. Patients with bowel disease have been shown to have antibodies that give a P-ANCA or C-ANCA pattern. These antibodies however may not be directed towards MPO. Patients with drug induced lupus, etc., often present with a P-ANCA pattern that is associated with antibodies against MPO.

Factor II Mutation (G20210A) is one of the most common causes of venous thrombosis. 2.3% of the general population is heterozygous in contrast with 6.2% of patients with venous thrombosis and 18% with familial venous thrombosis. Other risk factors compound the risk for venous thrombosis.

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Elevated RF is found in collagen vascular diseases such as SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, Sjögren's Syndrome, and in other conditions such as leprosy, tuberculosis, syphilis, malignancy, thyroid disease and in a significant percentage of otherwise normal elderly patients.

Rheumatoid factor is commonly used as a blood test for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. However, rheumatoid factor can also be present in individuals with other conditions such as lupus, infectious hepatitis, syphilis, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, liver disease, and sarcoidosis. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is detectable in the blood of 80% of adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid can be detected in the blood of normal individuals and of those with other autoimmune diseases that are not rheumatoid arthritis. In people with rheumatoid arthritis, high levels of rheumatoid factor can indicate a tendency toward more aggressive disease and/or a tendency to develop rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid lung disease. Rheumatoid factor is actually an antibody that can bind to other antibodies. Antibodies are normal proteins in our blood that are important parts of our immune system. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is not usually present in the normal individual. Rheumatoid factor is commonly used as a blood test for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid factor is present in about 80% of adults (but a much lower proportion of children) with rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatoid Factor (IgA, IgG, IgM) 

Reference Range(s)

  • Rhematoid Factor (IgA)
    • ≤6 Negative
    • >6 Positive
  • Rhematoid Factor (IgG)
    • ≤6 Negative
    • >6 Positive
  • Rhematoid Factor (IgM)
    • ≤6 Negative
    • >6 Positive

Rheumatoid factor is commonly used as a blood test for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. However, rheumatoid factor can also be present in individuals with other conditions such as lupus, infectious hepatitis, syphilis, mononucleosis, tuberculosis, liver disease, and sarcoidosis. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is detectable in the blood of 80% of adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid can be detected in the blood of normal individuals and of those with other autoimmune diseases that are not rheumatoid arthritis. In people with rheumatoid arthritis, high levels of rheumatoid factor can indicate a tendency toward more aggressive disease and/or a tendency to develop rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid lung disease. Rheumatoid factor is actually an antibody that can bind to other antibodies. Antibodies are normal proteins in our blood that are important parts of our immune system. Rheumatoid factor is an antibody that is not usually present in the normal individual. Rheumatoid factor is commonly used as a blood test for the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid factor is present in about 80% of adults (but a much lower proportion of children) with rheumatoid arthritis.


Vasculitis is a term that is used to describe a group of conditions characterized by inflamed blood vessels. If there is not a clear, obvious cause for the condition, then it is typically referred to as primary vasculitis. When there is a cause, it is called secondary vasculitis. There are a lot of things that can cause secondary vasculitis, such as allergic reactions to medication, infection with hepatitis C, auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, and even complications related to lymphoma or leukemia. 

Vasculitis can affect veins, arteries, and capillaries, resulting in narrowed vessels that limit the circulation of blood and can cause tissue or organ damage. A weakened vessel can lead to an aneurysm, which may, in turn, cause life-threatening internal bleeding. 

There are a lot of different kinds of vasculitis, and they are classified based on the size and type of the blood vessel affected. Understanding the different types and they’re sometimes confusing or nebulous symptoms is important for recognizing the condition so that people can get appropriate treatment. 

The Types of Vasculitis and their Symptoms 

Vasculitis is a systemic illness. This means that symptoms can often be non-specific. Some of the most common symptoms are easily confused with other diseases that cause inflammation, for example: 

  • Loss of appetite 
  • Fatigue 
  • Weight loss 
  • Aches and pains 
  • Fever 

The symptoms might come on suddenly or could gradually surface over a period of several months. The order of onset, presentation, and type of symptoms can vary massively. Some people experience localized symptoms specific to the type of vasculitis that they are suffering from, and this can help to characterize the condition more clearly in some cases, but not everyone’s condition results in the same symptoms, so diagnosis is not easy. 

Laboratory Test

Complete Blood Count (CBC) testing is a test that checks the red blood cells and hemoglobin and can help to diagnose anemia. It also looks at the white blood cell count, which may be increased if someone has an infection, or reduced if they have had treatments that may weaken the immune system. Some types of vasculitis can cause increased white blood cell counts. One example is Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (EGPA). 

C-reactive protein (CRP) testing can identify cases of inflammation within the body. 

Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) testing is another test that can detect inflammation, and it can identify certain types of vasculitis,  with this test also detects the presence of inflammation and can be increased in several types of vasculitis, such as microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis being one example. 

Creatinine testing is used to assess the functioning of the kidneys. Reduced kidney function is sometimes present in vasculitis. 

Liver panels help to determine if liver function is impaired. 

Urinalysis looks for red blood cells and protein in the urine, which can be a sign of kidney inflammation. 

Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) testing looks for a marker that can be often be found in patients with certain systemic vasculitis diseases. 

Complement is a test for the part of the immune response, which is something that is often reduced in people with vasculitis.