Celiac Disease

Order a celiac disease test to diagnose celiac disease by testing tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG)-IgA, Endomysial antibody (EMA)-IgA, and IgA and IgG antibodies to deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP). Order from Ulta Lab Tests and learn about your health today.


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Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

Celiac Disease - Advanced panel contained 12 tests and 70 biomarkers.

 

*Please note the Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel #19955 contains reflex tests - which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age, 

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).


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IMPORTANT - Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel #19955 contains reflex tests - which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age, 

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).


IMPORTANT - Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel #19955 contains reflex tests - which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age, 

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).


IMPORTANT - Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel #19955 contains reflex tests - which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age, 

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).


IMPORTANT - Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel #19955 contains reflex tests - which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age, 

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).


 Specimens from children less than 4 years of age (i.e., less than 48 months) are not appropriate for this test. The test for children 4 years of age and younger is the Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel, Infant (test code 15981).

Includes

Tissue Transglutaminase, IgA with Reflexes; Total IgA with Reflex

IMPORTANT - Note this is Reflex Test which if additional tests are run you will be charged for the specific tests that the lab peforms. Additional test will be run if the following criteria are met.


If the Tissue Transglutaminase IgA is positive,

1. Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86255).

If the Endomysial Antibody Screen (IgA) is positive, 

2. Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

If the Total IgA is less than the lower limit of the reference range, based on age

3. Tissue Transglutaminase IgG will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83516).

Clinical Significance

Celiac disease is caused by an immune response to gluten in genetically sensitive individuals. The diagnosis is largely based on a biopsy of the small intestine, but serologic tests also help support a diagnosis and may assist identification of patients who may require biopsy.

Tissue transglutaminase antibodies (tTG, IgA) is a marker with 95% sensitivity and specificity. Total IgA is measured because 2-3% of celiac disease patients are IgA deficient. Because tTG, IgA, and anti-Gliadin IgA tend to decrease in patients on a gluten-free diet, these markers are also used to assess dietary compliance.

The endomysial antibody (EMA, IgA) assay has high specificity for celiac disease and is used to confirm positive anti-tTG results.


Specimens from children less than 4 years of age (i.e., less than 48 months) are appropriate for this test. The test for people 4 years of age and older is the Celiac Disease Comprehensive Panel (test code 19955).

TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE AB, IGA
IMMUNOGLOBULIN A
GLIADIN (DEAMIDATED) AB (IGA)

Clinical Significance

This panel assists in differentiating celiac disease from other inflammatory bowel diseases and helps avoid progression of celiac disease, particularly in children, through early identification of gluten sensitivity.

Alternative Name(s) 

Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG),Gluten Sensitivity, tTG, EMA,Gliadin Antibody


Celiac Disease Panel without Gliadin

Clinical Significance

Celiac Disease Panel without Gliadin - This panel assists in differentiating celiac disease from other inflammatory bowel diseases and helps avoid progression of celiac disease, particularly in children, through early identification of gluten sensitivity.

Includes

  • Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)
  • IgA (Immunoglobulin A)

Methodology

Immunoassay (IA) • Immunoturbidimetric

Reference Range(s)

Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)

<15.0 U/mL Antibody not detected
≥15.0 U/mL Antibody detected


IgA (Immunoglobulin A)

Cord Blood 1-3 mg/dL
1-28 days 2-40 mg/dL
1-3 months 3-40 mg/dL
4-6 months 7-47 mg/dL
7-11 months 12-53 mg/dL
1 year 20-73 mg/dL
2 years 20-99 mg/dL
3-5 years 22-140 mg/dL
6-8 years 31-180 mg/dL
9-11 years 33-200 mg/dL
12-16 years 36-220 mg/dL
17-60 years 47-310 mg/dL
≥61 years 70-320 mg/dL

 

 

Result Code Result Name LOINC Code Component Name
40000700  TISSUE TRANSGLUTAMINASE AB, IGA  31017-7  Tissue transglutaminase Ab.IgA 
45073600  IMMUNOGLOBULIN A  2458-8  IgA

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)


See individual tests

Endomysial Antibody (IgA) Screen with Reflex to Titer.

If Endomysial Antibody (IgA) Screen is positive, Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge.

IMPORTANT - AN ADDITIONAL CHARGE OF $48.50 WILL BE APPLIED FOR THE Endomysial Antibody Titer test if run by the lab.


The fecal occult blood test is an immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test that qualitatively detects human hemoglobin from blood in fecal samples. This is a useful screening aid for detecting primarily lower gastrointestinal (G.I.) disorders that may be related to iron deficiency anemia, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, polyps, adenomas, colorectal cancers or other G.I. lesions that can bleed. It is recommended for use by health professionals as part of routine physical examinations and in screening for colorectal cancer or other sources of lower G.I. bleeding.

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Useful in the diagnosis of hypochromic, microcytic anemias. Decreased in iron deficiency anemia and increased in iron overload.


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Folic acid deficiency is common in pregnant women, alcoholics, in patients whose diets do not include raw fruits and vegetables, and in people with structural damage to the small intestine. The most reliable and direct method of diagnosing folate deficiency is the determination of folate levels in both erythrocytes and serum. Low folic acid levels, however, can also be the result of a primary vitamin B12 deficiency that decreases the ability of cells to take up folic acid

GI-1. Celiac Disease

  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Gliadin (Deamidated Peptide) Antibody (IgG, IgA)
  • Immunoglobulin A
  • Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)

GI-2. Celiac Disease

  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Ferritin
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gliadin (Deamidated Peptide) Antibody (IgG, IgA)
  • Immunoglobulin A
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

GI-3. Celiac Disease

  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Ferritin
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gliadin (Deamidated Peptide) Antibody (IgG, IgA)
  • Immunoglobulin A
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy, Total, Immunoassay
    Fecal Globin by Immunochemistry (InSure®)

GI-4. Celiac Disease

IMPORTANT: This panel includes two Reflux tests, that if positive the lab will run additional tests at an additional charge.

  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Endomysial Antibody Scr (Iga) W/Refl To Titer

Endomysial Antibody (IgA) Screen with Reflex to Titer.

If Endomysial Antibody (IgA) Screen is positive, Endomysial Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge.

IMPORTANT - AN ADDITIONAL CHARGE BE APPLIED FOR THE Endomysial Antibody Titer test if run by the lab.

  • Fecal Globin by Immunochemistry (InSure®)
  • Ferritin
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gliadin (Deamidated Peptide) Antibody (IgG, IgA)
  • Immunoglobulin A
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Reticulin IgG Screen with Reflex to Titer

Note: If Reticulin Antibody (IgG) Screen is Positive, Reticulin (IgG) Titer will be performed at an addtional charge.

 

  • Tissue Transglutaminase (tTG) Antibody (IgA)
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy, Total, Immunoassay

Detection of antibodies to gliadin, one of the major protein components of gluten, is a sensitive assay useful in diagnosing celiac disease. However, gliadin antibodies may be found in individuals without celiac disease; thus gliadin antibody assays are less specific than assays measuring antibodies to endomysium and transglutaminase. Recent work has revealed that gliadin-reactive antibodies from celiac patients bind to a very limited number of specific epitopes on the gliadin molecule. Further, deamidation of gliadin results in enhanced binding of gliadin antibodies. Based on this information, assays using deamidated gliadin peptides bearing the celiac-specific epitopes have much higher diagnostic accuracy for celiac disease when compared to standard gliadin antibody assays.

Detection of antibodies to gliadin, one of the major protein components of gluten, is a sensitive assay useful in diagnosing celiac disease. However, gliadin antibodies may be found in individuals without celiac disease; thus gliadin antibody assays are less specific than assays measuring antibodies to endomysium and transglutaminase. Recent work has revealed that gliadin-reactive antibodies from celiac patients bind to a very limited number of specific epitopes on the gliadin molecule. Further, deamidation of gliadin results in enhanced binding of gliadin antibodies. Based on this information, assays using deamidated gliadin peptides bearing the celiac-specific epitopes have much higher diagnostic accuracy for celiac disease when compared to standard gliadin antibody assays.

Detection of antibodies to gliadin, one of the major protein components of gluten, is a sensitive assay useful in diagnosing celiac disease. However, gliadin antibodies may be found in individuals without celiac disease; thus gliadin antibody assays are less specific than assays measuring antibodies to endomysium and transglutaminase. Recent work has revealed that gliadin-reactive antibodies from celiac patients bind to a very limited number of specific epitopes on the gliadin molecule. Further, deamidation of gliadin results in enhanced binding of gliadin antibodies. Based on this information, assays using deamidated gliadin peptides bearing the celiac-specific epitopes have much higher diagnostic accuracy for celiac disease when compared to standard gliadin antibody assays.

Celiac disease is a multigenic immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary proteins, commonly known as glutens, present in wheat, barley, and rye. Varied clinical manifestations begin either in childhood or adult life. Its prevalence in the united states ranges from 0.5 to 1%. Celiac disease is strongly associated with the HLA genetic region. Approximately 90% of celiac patients express the HLA-DQ2 molecule. Most of the DQ2 negative patients express the HLA-DQ8 molecule. Gluten peptides presented by these HLA molecules induce an abnormal mucosal immune response and tissue damage. The HLA-DQ molecules are heterodimers of an alpha and a beta chain. The beta chain of HLA-DQ2 is coded by HLA-DQB1*02 and of DQ8 by HLA-DQB1*0302. HLA-DQB1 genotyping allows clinicians to evaluate the genetic predisposition for celiac disease in a patient.

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Increased IgG is associated with acute and chronic inflammations, monoclonal IgG myeloma, autoimmune diseases; decreased IgG is found in selective IgG deficiency, Bruton's Disease, and acquired immune deficiency.

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Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

Test Highlight

 

   

Clinical Use

  • Diagnose IgA deficiencies

  • Determine etiology of recurrent infections

  • Diagnose infection

  • Diagnose inflammation

  • Diagnose IgA monoclonal gammopathy

Clinical Background

IgA is the first line of defense for the majority of infections at mucosal surfaces and consists of 2 subclasses. IgA1 is the dominant subclass, accounting for 80% to 90% of total serum IgA and greater than half of the IgA in secretions such as milk, saliva, and tears. IgA2, on the other hand, is more concentrated in secretions than in blood. IgA2 is more resistant to proteolytic cleavage and may be more functionally active than IgA1.

IgA deficiency is the most prevalent isotype deficiency, occurring in 1/400 to 1/700 individuals. Many patients with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic, while others may develop allergic disease, repeated sinopulmonary or gastroenterologic infections, and/or autoimmune disease. Individuals with complete absence of IgA (<5 mg/dL) may develop autoantibodies to IgA after blood or intravenous immunoglobulin infusions and may experience anaphylaxis on repeat exposure. 

Elevated serum IgA levels are associated with infection, inflammation, or IgA monoclonal gammopathy.

 


Research shows that one out of every 100 people in the world suffers from celiac disease. In the United States alone, experts estimate that 2.5 million people are genetically predisposed to the condition but have not taken steps to identify or treat it. 

In recent years, the disease has gained widespread attention, but the reality is that many of us could suffer from its symptoms without tracing them back to their real origin.

This is where a celiac blood test can make a world of difference. 

We offer several different kinds of tests designed to help you discern your risk factor for the condition. Today, we're taking a closer look at these tests and how each one works.

Ready to learn more? Let's get started.

What is Celiac Disease?

You might have heard of the gluten-free diet craze sweeping the nation. However, for those suffering from celiac disease, the decision to abstain from consuming gluten is far more serious than a weight-loss technique. In fact, the recent focus on eliminating the substance has even had negative effects on those who absolutely must remove it from their diet to stay healthy.

In short, celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by an inability to digest gluten.

In predisposed people, the presence of gluten causes their bodies to naturally catalyze an immune response that attacks their intestine. In turn, they develop small fingerlike projections, known as villi, on their intestinal lining. When this lining becomes compromised, it disrupts nutrient absorption.

As a result, people who suffer from celiac disease can experience any or all of the following symptoms:

  • Abdominal cramping and bloating
  • Chronic diarrhea or constipation
  • Vomiting
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Dental enamel weakening or defects
  • Iron deficiency anemia not cured by iron supplements
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Osteoporosis
  • Fatigue or weakness
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Mouth ulcers

Do any of the above signs or symptoms sound familiar to you? If so, a blood test can help you discern whether or not these conditions are linked to celiac disease. 

Different Celiac Blood Test Options

There are a few different kinds of blood tests that have biomarkers designed to identify conditions linked to celiac disease. When you order lab tests online from us, you can expedite and simplify the process.

1. Anti-tissue Transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies, IgA

Doctors can use an Anti-tissue Transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies, IgA test to diagnose celiac disease. In addition, this blood test can also help doctors perform health checks on patients currently treating the condition.

Tissue transglutaminase is a key enzyme that helps repair damage in your body. People with celiac disease make antibodies that attack this enzyme, aptly named anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies. If your blood test reveals a level of anti-tTG antibodies that is higher than normal, it can be a potential indicator of celiac disease.

2. Quantitative Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

Quantitative Immunoglobulin A (IgA) test helps evaluate a patient's immune system. Immunoglobulins, or antibodies, play a critical role in this system.

Produced by your plasma cells in response to viruses, bacteria, and other microorganisms, your body also creates immunoglobulins at other times. In particular, it produces them when it suspects exposures to a substance that it recognizes as a "non-self" or harmful antigen. 

There are multiple kinds of antibodies, including Immunoglobulin A (IgA), M (IgM), G (IgG), D (IgD) and E (IgE). Celiac disease is most closely linked with IgA. Comprising around 15% of your blood's total immunoglobulin count, IgA antibodies are present throughout your body. You'll find them in areas including your ears, eyes, saliva, nose, breathing passages and digestive tract.

Celiac disease can lower your immunoglobulin A counts significantly. In fact, an immunoglobulin A deficiency is 10 to 15 times more common in patients with the condition, compared to healthy subjects. If this test comes back low, it could indicate celiac disease.

3. Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) antibodies, IgA

Deamidated Gliadin Peptide (DGP) antibodies, IgA test is a routine way to check for celiac disease. This test monitors the level of deamidated gliadin antibodies (DMG) present in your blood.

Gliadin is one of the primary proteins in gluten. If you suffer from celiac disease, your body responds to gluten in an abnormal way. In response, your DMG antibody levels become higher than normal. 

4. Anti-Endomysial Antibodies (EMA), IgA

The Anti-Endomysial Antibodies (EMA), IgA test is highly specific for evaluating and monitoring celiac disease. This is another type of antibody that your boy creates in response to gluten.

If a blood test reveals that your EMA count is higher than average, this is a near-definite indicator of the condition.

5. Anti-Reticulin Antibodies (ARA), IgA

The term reticulin describes the connective tissues found in many different organs within your body. People with celiac disease will exhibit higher-than-average levels of antibodies designed to work against this collagen-containing tissue, known as anti-reticulin antibodies.

If your Anti-Reticulin Antibodies (ARA), IgA blood test reveals a high ARA antibody count, this could indicate the presence of celiac disease. 

6. Anti-Actin IgA (F-actin)

Actin filaments are thin and flexible fibers present in cells throughout your body. In your muscle cells, actin filaments combine into organized arrays with a set of thicker filaments, created from another protein called myosin. When these two proteins work in tandem, they create a force that catalyzes muscle contraction. 

People who suffer from celiac disease will produce antibodies that work against this function, leading to full or partial intestinal atrophy. An Anti-Actin IgA Test identifies the levels of these antibodies. 

7. Complete Blood Count (CBC)

Used to monitor and screen a variety of health conditions, a Complete Blood Count (CBC) test can help identify irregularities in the blood of people with celiac disease. Specifically, a CBC test will measure your red blood cell count. 

One of the most prevalent symptoms linked with celiac disease is iron-deficiency anemia. This is because the condition can cause damage to your small intestine, where nutrients such as folate, iron and vitamin B12 are absorbed. If your CBC test reveals a low red blood cell count, further testing can help pinpoint the exact cause behind this decline. 

8. Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)

In a similar vein, an Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) Test also monitors your red blood cells. Instead of their count, however, an ESR Test measures how quickly the cells sink to the bottom of a test tube that contains your blood sample.

In samples from people without celiac disease, the cells will sink at a relatively slow rate. When the condition is present, however, the cells will settle faster than normal. This can signify the presence of inflammation in your body. This inflammation could be linked to celiac disease, which triggers an inappropriate immune system response that inflames your muscles and organs.

9. C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

Like the ESR Test, a C-Reactive Protein (CRP) Test will also check for inflammation in your body. Your liver produces CRP and then sends it to your bloodstream as an inflammatory defense. Most people have low levels of inflammation and thus low CRP counts. However, someone with celiac disease will exhibit elevated levels of both.

Inflammation is your body's natural defense mechanism. It helps protect your tissues in the case of injury or infection. Some autoimmune disorders and chronic diseases, including celiac disease, will also trigger inflammation. 

10. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

Doctors rely on a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP) to identify a range of conditions. In the case of celiac disease, a CMP Test can help measure protein, calcium and electrolyte levels in your body. It can also help verify the condition of your liver and kidney.

11. Vitamin D

People suffering from celiac disease are at a greater risk of developing a vitamin D deficiency. Specifically, 64% of men and 71% of women with the condition are deficient in this critical antioxidant. 

In this case, the issue is linked to both malabsorption and inadequate dietary intake.

Many gluten-containing grain products are often fortified with extra vitamins and minerals, whereas gluten-free products normally aren't. In addition, those with celiac disease might have a harder time absorbing vitamin D from the foods they do consume. A Vitamin D test can confirm these levels.

12. Vitamin B12

Your small intestine is a valuable organ. One of its many duties is absorbing vitamin B12, the nutrient linked to healthy nerve and blood cells, as well as DNA formation.

People with celiac disease are often deficient in vitamin B12. They are unable to absorb adequate levels of the nutrient because of the damage that the disease causes to their small intestine. A Vitamin B12 blood test can help determine if these levels are too low.

13. Folate

Like Vitamin D, folate is another nutrient that someone with celiac disease might have a difficult time absorbing. This is because, again, the small intestine is responsible for absorbing folate, along with iron and vitamin B12. 

Note that someone with early-stage celiac disease might experience malabsorption issues centered mostly on iron and folate. These two nutrients are absorbed in the upper two parts of the small intestine (the proximal section), where the condition first strikes. As the disease progresses, the malabsorption focus will move downward toward the lower part of the small intestine, where vitamin B12 is produced.

14. Iron, Total and Total Iron Binding Capacity

The Iron, Total and Total Iron Binding Capacity test measures how well iron moves throughout your body. Monitoring this movement is critical because iron is key to the production of hemoglobin.

This is the protein in your red blood cells responsible for transporting oxygen throughout your body. Thus, low iron levels can lead to low hemoglobin levels, which is a condition known as iron deficiency anemia. If you're unable to absorb an adequate amount of iron in your small intestine due to celiac disease, your entire circulatory system could suffer. 

This test will help ensure that iron is moving in the correct quantities and at the right capacity. 

15. Ferritin

Ferritin is an iron-containing blood cell protein. A Ferritin Test will reveal how much iron your body is currently storing and how much it's capable of storing. If your stores are low, it indicates that you aren't absorbing and retaining the nutrient as you should. 

Gluten intolerance is linked to low ferritin levels. This blood test is an accurate way to see where yours measure up. The levels will be most severe in those with celiac disease.

16. Stool Fat

Those suffering from celiac disease are no stranger to chronic and often painful diarrhea. Characterized by watery or semi-formed stools, this symptom occurs when patients are unable to digest or absorb certain key nutrients. 

One of these is ingested fat, known as steatorrhea. If your body cannot absorb adequate levels of steatorrhea, it will eliminate into your stool. A Stool Fat Test measure how much excessive dietary fat is present in your stool.

Order a Celiac Blood Test Online Today

With an inventory that includes more than 1,000 blood tests, we can help you take a comprehensive look at your overall health. When you're seeking answers about a particular condition, such as celiac disease, these tests make it easier to discover the knowledge you need.

Our easy ordering system makes it a cinch to order a celiac blood test today. You'll order your tests, visit an approved patient service center to complete your lab test or panel, and review your results via a secure portal in a matter of days. There's no reason to hesitate, especially when your health is at stake. 

When you order through us, you can skip past the doctor's waiting room. You'll also ensure your personal information remains confidential the entire time. With your results in hand, you can follow-up with your healthcare provider to have a more direct, informed conversation about your next steps. 

When you're ready to get started, check out our shop at ultalabtests.com. The answers you're looking for are only one click away.

Have you been experiencing stomach problems that you haven't been able to explain? Are you having symptoms that you haven't been able to find the cause for? Have you noticed that your body reacts when you eat gluten?

You may benefit from getting a celiac disease test. Many people go a long time without realizing that they have celiac disease. Symptoms for celiac disease can often go undetected or be brushed off as other ailments. 

If you think that you may have celiac disease, keep reading to find out the best celiac disease test and how it can help you.

What Is Celiac Disease?

You may have heard of celiac disease when people talk about gluten-free diets, but what is it exactly? Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease that affects the body's ability to digest gluten. 

The body reacts to the gluten protein that is found in wheat, barley, and rye. If someone with celiac disease eats gluten, the digestive system becomes inflamed, damaging the villi in the intestines. 

About Celiac Disease

Thankfully, celiac disease can be managed easily by maintaining a gluten-free diet. If someone with celiac disease does not follow a strict gluten-free diet, they may experience a variety of different health problems. 

When consumed, the gluten protein damages the villi in the intestines. The villi look like tiny fingers on the inside of the intestines, and when damaged, they become blunted or can even shrink down to nothing. 

The villi are essential for helping the digestive system to absorb nutrients from the food we eat. If they become damaged, our bodies cannot properly absorb the nutrients we need to survive, which is why many people with celiac disease show signs of malnutrition, even if they are eating an otherwise healthy and normal diet. 

Malnutrition can cause a number of other health concerns, so it is important for people who have celiac disease to maintain a strict, gluten-free diet

Risk Factors for Celiac Disease

Some people may be more at risk of having celiac disease than others. While it is possible for anyone to have the disease, there are certain factors that you should pay attention to if you are concerned about having celiac disease. 

If one of your family members has been diagnosed with celiac disease, it will benefit you to get tested as well. Celiac disease is hereditary, so there is a higher chance that you also have the disease.

Certain genes can also put you at risk for developing celiac disease. If you are curious if you carry these genes, genetic testing can give you that answer.

Having other autoimmune diseases, such as diabetes, can also increase your risk of having celiac disease. If you have been diagnosed with other autoimmune diseases, it would be a good idea to get a celiac disease test to be on the safe side.  

Causes of Celiac Disease

While the cause for celiac disease is unknown, there are some circumstances to look out for. Some people have noticed signs or symptoms after pregnancy or surgery. Some people have also noticed signs of celiac disease after having a viral infection. 

If you think you may be at risk of celiac, are experiencing symptoms, and recently experienced one of the circumstances listed above, it may be a good time to get a test to rule out celiac disease. 

Signs and Symptoms of Celiac Disease 

There are many signs and symptoms of celiac disease that you can look out for. Some symptoms vary depending on age, so if you are concerned about your child or a younger family member having celiac disease, make sure to pay attention to those signs as well. 

If you are experiencing iron deficiency anemia or extreme fatigue, this may be a sign of celiac disease. Since celiac disease makes it hard for your body to absorb nutrients, it is common to feel as though you are not getting enough nutrients. 

Joint pain, arthritis, and tingling or numbness in the extremities are more symptoms that you can look out for. You should also take note if you are experiencing depression, anxiety, or have had a seizure

Women with undiagnosed celiac disease may experience missed periods, multiple miscarriages, or even infertility. Any gastrointestinal distress is also important to take notice of. 

Symptoms that are more common amongst children include the following:

  • Extreme bloating, abdominal pain, and gastrointestinal distress
  • Vomiting, chronic diarrhea, or constipation
  • Delayed growth, failure to thrive, and behavioral issues
  • Abnormal fatigue and anemia

If you notice any of these signs or symptoms in yourself or your family members, it is a good time to get a celiac disease test!

Lab Tests for Celiac Disease

If you think you may have celiac disease, a lab test is the best place to start. There are several different blood tests that you can get that will help doctors to identify if you may have celiac disease. The most commonly ordered lab test is the anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) antibodies test, but there are other tests that doctors may order as well.

These tests measure different levels of antibodies, irregularities, and levels of different vitamins and minerals in your body. These can give doctors an idea of how your body is reacting to gluten and whether you should be following a strict, gluten-free diet. 

Taking a lab test for celiac disease is an important first step to improving your health. If your blood tests come back positive for celiac disease, your doctor may request a biopsy of your intestines to assess any damage to the villi in your stomach. 

Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease and Lab Testing 

Celiac disease and lab testing can raise some questions. Here are some frequently asked questions and answers to help you to understand more about the disease and the testing that helps identify it. 

Q. Is Celiac Disease Hereditary?

A. Yes. If you have a family member with celiac disease, there is a higher chance that you will have the disease as well. 

Q. Is Celiac Disease Curable? 

A. There is no known cure for celiac disease. Celiac disease symptoms can be treated and managed easily by following a gluten-free diet. 

Q. Is Celiac Disease Deadly?

A. Untreated, celiac disease can be deadly. It can cause other health complications as well that can be dangerous. Identifying and monitoring celiac disease is extremely important.

Q. What Happens If You Keep Eating Gluten With Celiac Disease?

A. If you have celiac disease and you continue to eat gluten, you may continue to experience symptoms, and they can become worse. Over time, your stomach lining will become damaged, and you may experience further complications such as malnutrition or even develop other autoimmune diseases. If the celiac disease goes untreated for too long, there can even be fatal consequences. 

If you are diagnosed with celiac disease, it is vital for your health to maintain a strict, gluten-free diet to make sure your health is taken care of. 

Q. How Do I Prepare For a Celiac Disease Lab Test?

A. If you have an upcoming lab test for celiac, don't do anything. Don't make any changes at all to your diet until after you get a diagnosis. There needs to be gluten in your system for the test to properly pick up any abnormalities. 

Eating a gluten-free diet prior to your test can give you inaccurate results. It is best to maintain your current diet until after you get the results back from your test. 

Q. What Is a Normal Range For a Celiac Disease Blood Test?

A. For the most common test, the anti-tTG test, a person without celiac disease will measure less than four to six U/mL. If your blood test results come back with higher levels than this, it is possible that you may be diagnosed with celiac disease. 

Q. Is Fasting Required For a Celiac Disease Blood Test?

A. Fasting is not required for a celiac disease blood test. In fact, it is discouraged. Continue to eat and maintain a normal diet that includes gluten so that you can get the most accurate results possible. 

Pay Attention to Your Health and Take a Celiac Disease Test 

If you are experiencing symptoms, a celiac disease test can help you identify and diagnose celiac disease. Living with celiac disease can be easy once your symptoms are managed, and the first step is to get a lab test. 

Ulta Lab Tests offers a number of lab tests that can help you to identify celiac disease early. The benefits of celiac disease lab testing with Ulta Lab Tests include:
• Secure and Confidential Results
• No Insurance or Referral Needed
• Affordable Pricing including Doctor's Order
• Results in 24 to 48 hours

Take charge of your health and track your progress with Ulta Lab Tests, and order your lab tests today!

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that disrupts the body’s ability to digest gluten. Gluten is a dietary protein in wheat products; the disease also affects some related proteins found in barley and rye. Celiac causes the small intestine to become inflamed when exposed to gluten; the inflammation can damage or destroy the lining of the intestine.

The intestinal wall is studded with villi, projecting folds of tissue that increase the surface area available to absorb nutrients (including vitamins, fluids, minerals, and electrolytes) from food. When a person with celiac disease eats gluten, it triggers the body’s immune system. Immune cells will attack the intestinal villi. This immune response usually, but not always, involves the production of auto-antibody proteins by the immune system.

The harmful immune response and autoantibody production will continue if the individual is exposed to gluten and the other relevant proteins. Over time, the immune system can do enough damage to the intestinal villi to reduce the body’s ability to absorb nutrients. This results in the affected person developing symptoms associated with malnutrition.

Celiac disease occurs all over the world, with individuals of European descent being more likely to experience it. In the United States, celiac disorder occurs at a rate of one case in 100 to 150 individuals. Women are slightly more susceptible than men. While celiac can develop at any age, it is most seen in infants or people between 30 and 50 years of age.

At one time, adult celiac disease was much less common and infant celiac disease was much more serious. The disease’s demographics have changed, with the frequency of adult cases growing more abundant in recent years.

Celiac disorder is an inherited condition, but it appears that some event — physical, environmental, or psychological — is required to trigger the disease. The mechanism that causes celiac to manifest is not yet fully understood by doctors.

Data from the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse points out the genetic component of celiac disease. Celiac disorder is more common among the first-degree relatives (parents, children, and siblings) of individuals who already have it. Celiac disorder occurs in approximately 4 to 12 percent of first-degree relatives of those who already have it.

Celiac Disease Symptoms

Researchers estimate that there may be as many as 20 million people with celiac around the world, with two to three million of them in the United States. Exact figures are difficult to come by as 90 percent of the people who have celiac disorder in the US go undiagnosed. One fact that makes the disease hard to pin down is that individual sufferers’ symptoms can vary widely.

How celiac disorder manifests tends to vary based on the individual’s age and physical development. Digestive symptoms are more common in infants and children. At the same time, adult sufferers tend to experience symptoms affecting other parts of the body. The symptoms of celiac disease can also be caused by many other medical conditions, such as a food allergy. This leads to many cases going undiagnosed for years.

These are all common symptoms of celiac disease:

  • Abdominal bloating and pain
  • Chronic constipation or diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Greasy, foul-smelling stool
  • Susceptibility to bruising and bleeding
  • Pain in bones and joints
  • Fatigue
  • Mental focus problems
  • Oral ulcers
  • Dental enamel defects
  • Osteoporosis
  • Weight Loss
  • Anemia/iron deficiency that cannot be corrected via supplements

In children, celiac disorder can retard growth and development, delay puberty, and cause short stature. Adults with celiac disease may suffer from reproductive issues, including infertility.

People living with Celiac disease also often develop dermatitis herpetiformis, a skin condition that raises itchy blisters.

Celiac disorder is associated with an increased risk of developing intestinal lymphoma (cancer).

Testing For Celiac Disease

The first step in making a celiac disease diagnosis is to test for the presence of specific autoantibodies associated with the condition. A biopsy is performed to confirm the diagnosis if auto-antibody tests suggest celiac disease’s presence. Further auto-antibody testing can be used to monitor the progression of celiac disease and its treatment, which is often done for symptomatic patients. Auto-antibody testing can also be used to screen relatives after one family member has been diagnosed.

There are two classes of intestinal autoantibodies that can be detected, IgA and IgG. IgA tests are more specific, leading to them being heavily preferred in diagnosing celiac disease. IgA is the most common antibody found in gastrointestinal secretions. IgG tests are still useful because a small fraction of celiac disease patients (two to three percent) also have an IgA deficiency.

Common IgA tests for celiac disease include the following:

Testing for anti-tTG antibodies in the blood is the most sensitive and specific way to detect celiac disease, so this is usually the first test performed. There is a less-sensitive test for anti-tTG in the IgG class; this usually is only used if the individual is IgA-deficient.

This test is often included in the celiac testing process because it will detect the presence of an IgA deficiency.

People with celiac disease who test negative for anti-tTG may test positive for DGP. This test is especially effective at diagnosing celiac disease in young children.

The American College of Gastroenterology recommends performing both DGP IgGtesting and anti-tTG IgG testing for any patients with low IgA levels.

There are additional auto-antibody tests that are less commonly used to diagnose celiac disorder. These include:

This test can provide clarification if initial test results are inconclusive. EMA tests are difficult to perform when compared with anti-tTG tests.

ARA testing is surpassed by all the above tests for specificity and sensitivity. Thus, it is rarely ordered today.

As noted above, a celiac disorder diagnosis is generally confirmed by performing a biopsy on the small intestine. This can directly detect any damage to the intestinal villi. See the article on Histopathology for more information on biopsies.

There are genetic tests that can detect markers associated with celiac disease, but these are not used routinely. The key markers for celiac disease are the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) markers DQ2 and DQ8. Genetic testing may be ordered for patients whose other test results are inconclusive and for screening family members in high-risk categories.

Genetic tests cannot make a conclusive diagnosis of celiac disease. The markers mentioned above are carried by roughly 30 percent of the general population, most of whom do not have the condition. Negative genetic results are useful, though, because they can rule out celiac disorder for individuals with inconclusive results on other tests (including biopsies).

Additional tests may be used to evaluate the extent of the disease and the patient’s symptoms. Examples include:

  • Stool fat — to evaluate nutrient absorption problems