All Digestive System Tests

Order our digestive system tests to help diagnose intestine, colon, pancreas, and liver problems to achieve optimal gastrointestinal health.

Don't overlook your gastrrointestional health. With so much focus on cancer, heart attacks, and strokes, it's easy for your gut health to get lost in the shuffle.  However, it's important to have digestive lab tests done regularly. Catching digestive system conditions before they start is the best form of medicine.


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Absolute Lymphocyte Count includes: WBC, Absolute Lymphocytes, % Lymphocytes, % Reactive Lymphocytes

Clinical Significance

Increased understanding of immunodeficiency syndrome and AIDS have identified the importance of absolute lymphocyte count in addition to the specific cell type such as CD4 lymphocytes. In pediatric ages up to 14 years old, acute infectious lymphocytosis is a clinical disorder, suspected to be of enterovirus-Coxsackie A subgroup that may have upper respiratory symptoms, fever, diarrhea and abdominal pain or a totally asymptomatic clinical course. Other conditions with absolute lymphocytosis are B. pertussis infection and lymphocytic leukemoid reaction. The most commonly known lymphocytosis with atypical morphology is due to cytomegalovirus and infectious mononucleosis. The malignant forms of absolute lymphocytosis are mostly due to lymphoproliferative disorders.


Adenovirus causes respiratory tract infections, conjunctivitis, and diarrhea. Infections are most common in individuals who are immunocompromised and in young children. Adenovirus Antigen Detection is useful to confirm the diagnosis of adenovirus infection in patients with gastroenteritis.

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Aids in the diagnosis of primary disease of skeletal muscle myocardial infarction and viral hepatitis.


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The major sources of amylase are the pancreas and the salivary glands. The most common cause of elevation of serum amylase is inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis). In acute pancreatitis, serum amylase begins to rise within 6-24 hours, remains elevated for a few days and returns to normal in 3-7 days. Other causes of elevated serum amylase are inflammation of salivary glands (mumps), biliary tract disease and bowel obstruction. Elevated serum amylase can also be seen with drugs (e.g., morphine) which constrict the pancreatic duct sphincter preventing excretion of amylase into the intestine.

In pancreatitis, urine levels of amylase reflect serum changes by a time lag of 6-10 hours.


Antinuclear antibodies are associated with rheumatic diseases including Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, CREST syndrome, and neurologic SLE. 

Reflex Information: If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge.


Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, as well as other autoimmune diseases.

Additional test processing fees will be charged if initial results dictate Reflex (further) testing.


Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA and/or atypical P-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases, inflammatory bowel disease, as well as other autoimmune diseases.

Testing for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (P-ANCA and/or C-ANCA) has been found to be useful in establishing the diagnosis of suspected vascular diseases (e.g., crescentic glomerulonephritis, microscopic polyarteritis and Churg-Strauss syndrome), bowel disease (Crohn's Disease, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and autoimmune hepatitis) as well as with other autoimmune diseases (drug-induced lupus, SLE, Felty's syndrome). ANCA has classically been divided into C-ANCA and P-ANCA depending on the immunofluorescent pattern observed. More recently the specific antigens responsible for these patterns have been described and isolated. The antigen that gives the C-ANCA pattern is proteinase-3 (PR-3). Multiple antigens are responsible for P-ANCA pattern, the principle antigen being myeloperoxidase (MPO). Patients with vascular diseases will generally have either a C-ANCA pattern or P-ANCA pattern, and give positive results in specific tests for PR-3 or MPO. Patients with bowel disease have been shown to have antibodies that give a P-ANCA or C-ANCA pattern. These antibodies however, may not be directed towards MPO. Patients with drug induced lupus, etc., often present with a P-ANCA pattern that is associated with antibodies against MPO.

Beta-2-microglobulin normally passes through the glomerulus into the proximal tubule where much of it is reabsorbed. Serum levels are therefore an index of glomerular function. When impaired, serum levels rise in inverse ratio to glomerular filtration rate. Increased amounts of beta-2-microglobulin are excreted in several renal disorders, e.g., Balkan nephropathy, heavy metal poisoning and renal tubular disease due to therapeutic agents. Serial levels of beta-2-microglobulin in serum and urine are used to evaluate transplant viability and anticipate rejection. Following a successful graft, serum levels decline toward normal. Increasing serum levels provide an early sign of rejection. Elevated levels are also noted in lymphproliferative disorders, neoplasms (malignant and benign), inflammatory disease, and autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's disease


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C-Peptide is useful in the evaluation of pancreatic beta cell function and for determining the source of insulin in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e. , insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) Useful in predicting risk for cardiovascular disease.


C3a desArg is a cleavage product of C3 complement component activation. Elevated levels of C3a have been reported in patients with acute lyme disease, acute pancreatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and adult respiratory distress syndrome.


C4B is a complement binding protein that specifically binds 50% circulating protein S, a vitamin K dependent cofactor of protein C activation. Since C4B may be elevated in certain disease states, this may affect the available "free protein S" to engage in anticoagulant activity.


People tend to overlook their digestive health. With so much focus on cancer, heart attacks, and strokes, it's easy for your gut health to get lost in the shuffle. 

That's why it's vital to have digestive lab tests done regularly. Catching digestive system conditions before they start is the best way to treat them. 

If monitoring your gut health is new to you, don't worry. In this article, we're going to cover everything you need to know about your gut.  

Digestive System Conditions 

There are different kinds of gastrointestinal lab tests to monitor different enzymes and bacteria in your gut. The bacteria in your gut is known as "good bacteria." These bacteria need to maintain their presence in your stomach for the system to remain healthy in the long run. An unhealthy digestive system can give rise to the following conditions.

Celiac Disease 

This is an acute gluten sensitivity in the digestive system. People with celiac disease suffer from an immune response triggered in the small intestine whenever they eat foods containing gluten. Gluten is common in flour and wheat-based products. If you don't treat celiac disease, it can affect the absorption of nutrients in your small intestines, and the lining of your small intestine will begin to deteriorate over time. The damage done by celiac disease to your small intestines can lead to more severe complications in the future. 

Symptoms of Celiac Disease include: 

  • Fatigue 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Abdominal pain 
  • Bloating 
  • Constipation 
  • Weight loss 
  • Nausea and vomiting 

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) 

Inflammatory Bowel Disease is a blanket term that covers several conditions that affect the bowels. The two major types of inflammatory bowel disease are colitis & Crohn's disease. Ulcerative colitis involves ulcers and inflammation along the lining of the large intestine. This condition can affect your rectum and colon too. Crohn's disease has similar symptoms to colitis and also involves the swelling of the digestive tract. Crohn's can affect the deeper layers of the digestive tract. 

Symptoms Of Inflammatory Bowel Disease include:

  • Abdominal pain 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Fatigue 
  • Fast weight loss 
  • Loss of appetite 
  • Blood in stools  

Inflammatory Bowel Syndrome (IBS) 

IBS affects the lower and upper regions of the GI tract. The condition can affect the small intestines, large intestines, and colon at the same time—people suffering from IBS experience chronic constipation, chronic diarrhea, or both. Medical experts believe that IBS occurs due to severe food poisoning. 

Lactose Intolerance 

Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest lactose. This condition occurs due to a lack of lactase enzymes in the digestive system. Lactase is the enzyme responsible for processing lactose in the body. When lactase levels are low in a person's body, they may suffer from lactose intolerance.  

Symptoms Of Lactose Intolerance include:

  • Bloating 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Gas 
  • Pancreatic disease 
  • Stomach cramps 
  • Nausea and vomiting   

Pancreatic Diseases

Problems in your digestive tract can result in several pancreatic diseases, including acute pancreatitis. If you don't treat acute pancreatitis on time, it can lead to much bigger problems in the long run. 

Symptoms Of Pancreas Malfunction include:

  • Nausea and vomiting 
  • Excess gas 
  • Abdominal pain and swelling 
  • Weight loss 
  • Malnutrition 
  • Fever 
  • Light-colored stools  
  • Foul-smelling stools 
  • Diarrhea 

If you have any of these symptoms for more than 2-3 days, make sure you consult a doctor.  

Peptic Ulcers 

Peptic ulcers develop in the inner lining of the stomach. They usually affect the upper section of the small intestine and occur as duodenal ulcers or gastric ulcers. While duodenal ulcers occur in the upper section of the small intestine or the duodenum, gastric ulcers will occur in the stomach.  

Symptoms Of Peptic Ulcers include:

  • Bloating 
  • Feeling full 
  • Heartburn 
  • Belching 
  • Nausea 
  • Burning pain in the stomach 
  • Intolerance to fatty foods 

Lab Tests for Digestive Conditions 

Digestive lab tests help screen, diagnose, and monitor various digestive conditions. Two of the most common and effective digestive lab tests are the stool culture and fecal occult test. The fecal occult test checks for blood in your stool. The test is conducted by placing a fecal sample on a special card. The card is then sent to a lab for testing. The stool culture test searches for abnormal bacteria in the stool, and results will take at least 2-3 days. 

In addition to the above tests, doctors can use imaging tests to take an in-depth look at a patient's digestive system.  

Here are some of the most popular procedures to monitor digestive conditions: 

  • Lower GI series 
  • CT or CAT scan 
  • MRI 
  • Upper GI series 
  • Colonoscopy 
  • Ultrasound 

Digestive System Lab Tests FAQs 

Digestive conditions cover a wide range of diseases affecting the digestive system of a person. If you don't know what you are looking for, it is easy for these conditions to be overlooked. Here are some of the most common FAQs about digestive disorders and lab tests: 

Q. What are the most common problems in the GI tract? 

Heartburn, IBS, and cancer are some of the most common conditions that affect a person's digestive system. Rectal problems such as fissures and hemorrhoids also can occur.  

Q. What are the most common signs and symptoms of digestive conditions? 

  • Abdominal pain 
  • Bloating 
  • Swelling 
  • Belching 
  • Diarrhea 
  • Gas  
  • Fatigue 
  • Constipation 

If you experience any of these symptoms regularly, you should consult a doctor. 

Q. Does bloodwork reveal digestive problems? 

Yes. Your doctor can order blood tests to diagnose a digestive problem. The tests will check for levels of specific substances in the blood. Bloodwork is common in diagnosing Celiac disease, ulcerative colitis, or Crohn's disease. 

Solving Your Digestive Problems 

Ulta Lab Tests offers highly accurate and reliable tests so that you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are some things that you will love about Ulta Lab Tests: 

  • You don't need health insurance 
  • Your results are confidential and secure 
  • We offer affordable rates for lab tests 
  • You don't need a physician's referral 
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee 

Take control with Ulta Lab Tests today!