Minerals

If you are looking for a mineral blood test for mineral deficiency, we can help you get tested. Find out what you should know about it today.


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Boron, Urine

Clinical Significance

Boron is used in cleaning agents, preservatives, and fungicides. Boron may cause dermatitis, cough, and shortness of breath. Most is excreted by the kidney.

 

Patient Preparation

Avoid exposure to gadolinium based contrast media for 48 hours prior to sample collection

 



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Decreased levels of ceruloplasmin are found in Wilson''s Disease, fulminant liver failure, intestinal malabsorption, renal failure resulting in proteinuria, chronic active hepatitis and malnutrition. Elevated levels are found in primary biliary cirrhosis, pregnancy (first trimester), oral contraceptive use and in acute inflammatory conditions since ceruloplasmin is an acute phase reactant

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This assay is useful to monitor exposure to chromium, progress of medical treatment or determine nutritional status.

Occupational exposure and exposure to environmental contamination of chromium may lead to toxicity. The need for chromium supplements is unproven. Supplements taken in excess may also lead to chromium toxicity.

Chromium is used in the manufacturing of stainless steel and for plating other metals. It is also a component of cement. Chromic acid or its salts constitute an industrial hazard. They may lead to ulceration of the skin and respiratory passages. Ingestion can cause violent gastroenteritis.


Occupational exposure and exposure to environmental contamination of Chromium may lead to toxicity. The need for Chromium supplements is unproven. Supplements taken in excess may also lead to Chromium toxicity.

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)


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Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Copper concentrations increase in acute phase reactions and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Copper concentrations are decreased with nephrosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients, especially preterm newborns, on nutritional supplementation. Results of copper are often interpreted together with ceruloplasmin.

Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Urinary copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients on chealation therapy

Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Copper concentrations increase in acute phase reactions and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Copper concentrations are decreased with nephrosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients, especially preterm newborns, on nutritional supplementation. Results of copper are often interpreted together with ceruloplasmin.


Clinical Significance

Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Copper concentrations increase in acute phase reactions. Copper concentrations are decreased with nephrosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients, especially preterm newborns, on nutritional supplementation. Results of copper are often interpreted together with ceruloplasmin.


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Useful in the diagnosis of hypochromic, microcytic anemias. Decreased in iron deficiency anemia and increased in iron overload.


Ferritin, Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

  • Ferritin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

Iodine is as essential element that is required for thyroid hormone production. The measurement of urinary iodine serves as an index of adequate intake.

Iodine is an essential element that is required for thyroid hormone production. The measurement of urinary iodine serves as an index of adequate dietary intake.

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Iodine is an essential element that is required for thyroid hormone production. The measurement of iodine serves as an index of adequate dietary intake.

Serum iron quantification is useful in confirming the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or hemochromatosis. The measurement of total iron binding in the same specimen may facilitate the clinician''s ability to distinguish between low serum iron levels caused by iron deficiency from those related to inflammatory neoplastic disorders. The assay for iron measures the amount of iron which is bound to transferrin. The total iron binding capacity (TIBC) measures the amount of iron that would appear in blood if all the transferrin were saturated with iron. It is an indirect measurement of transferri


Tests Included

CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)w/Hemoglobin

Ceruloplasmin

Copper

Ferritin

Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

Magnesium, RBC

Transferrin

Zinc


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Urinary magnesium concentrations often decline before serum concentrations. Adverse effects, such as cardiac arrhythmias, can be observed while serum concentrations are within range.


We have all heard that eating a balanced diet full of vitamins and minerals is essential to maintaining our health.

But, even if you're eating a balanced diet, you might be experiencing a mineral deficiency.

92% of Americans are deficient in at least one vitamin or mineral.

Here, we will answer all of your most pressing questions about mineral deficiency and how to diagnose and monitor it with a mineral blood test.

What Is Mineral Deficiency?

Minerals are necessary micronutrients for the body to function normally. These are some examples of minerals that are essential in a healthy body:

  • Calcium
  • Vitamin B12
  • Potassium
  • Iron
  • Iodine
  • Vitamin D

The majority of these micronutrients are not produced naturally by the body and are obtained through the food you eat.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is the amount of that nutrient sufficient to consume in one day.

A mineral deficiency occurs when the body is not obtaining or absorbing a sufficient amount of one or more minerals.

Mineral deficiencies can cause a number of different side effects, some of which are serious health concerns.

Iron and zinc deficiencies can lead to DNA damage and cancer.

Risk Factors for Mineral Deficiency

A deficiency occurs over time for a number of different reasons and will vary from person to person. However, there are certain risk factors that put someone at a higher risk for mineral deficiency.

Some people at risk are picky eaters, people with eating disorders, or those on a low-calorie diet. They may not be getting the wide range of different foods in their diet that is necessary to obtain sufficient nutrients.

If you have a restricted diet, like a vegan or vegetarian diet, you may also be at greater risk of mineral deficiency. Those consuming vegan and vegetarian diets are particularly at risk for calcium and iron deficiency.

Calcium is common in dairy products that vegans avoid. And red meats are a great source of iron.

Alcoholics and those with other diseases are also at increased risk of mineral deficiency.

Anyone at increased risk for a deficiency should take care to eat a balanced diet. They may benefit from supplementation with a complete vitamin and mineral. They can also monitor their health with a regular blood test for minerals deficiencies.

Causes of Mineral Deficiency

There are three main causes of mineral deficiency: 

  1. Diet
  2. Increased need for a nutrient
  3. Difficulty absorbing a nutrient

If your diet does not contain a broad array of fruits and vegetables, you may experience a mineral deficiency. Processed foods and junk foods are not great sources of essential nutrients.

Additionally, you may experience an increased need for certain nutrients during different stages of your life. For example, women often have different nutrient needs during pregnancy, heavy menstruation, and menopause.

Many medical conditions like liver disease, gallbladder disease, and chronic alcoholism can impede your body's ability to properly absorb the nutrients in your diet, resulting in a deficiency.

Some medications, like antacids, laxatives, and antibiotics, may also interfere with the body's absorption of nutrients.

Signs and Symptoms of Mineral Deficiency

The signs and symptoms will vary depending on which mineral is deficient. Generally, you should seek further testing and speak with a medical professional if you notice that you are experiencing any unordinary symptoms.

There are countless different minerals in which someone might be experiencing a deficiency. Here are some of the most common mineral deficiencies and their symptoms.

Zinc

Zinc is a critical nutrient in keeping the immune system functioning and also helps with healing wounds and protein synthesis.

If you are experiencing a zinc deficiency, you might develop a loss of appetite, taste, or smell. You may also be more likely to get sick because of decreased immune system functioning.

Calcium

Calcium is the building block of your bones and teeth, helping to keep them strong. It is also critical in heart and nerve function.

The most common sign of calcium deficiency is osteoporosis. If your doctor notices that you have osteoporosis, or if you recognize that your diet is lacking in calcium-rich foods, you may have a calcium deficiency.   

Iron

Iron is the most common mineral deficiency. The most common side effect is anemia. When someone is anemic, they do not have enough red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout their body.

If you are experiencing fatigue, it could be iron deficiency. Symptoms of anemia include tiredness, weakness, decreased brain function. 

Diagnosing Mineral Deficiency with a Mineral Blood Test

Diagnosing mineral deficiencies is commonly done by evaluating symptoms and diet with nutrition tests. As you evaluate a variety of potential causes, the process may proceed slowly.

However, if you suspect you have nutritional deficiencies and are seeking medical advice, you are probably wondering, is there a blood test for vitamins?

Testing for mineral deficiencies with a blood test for vitamins is an effective, quick, and reliable way to evaluate your health.

You can compare your test result with a reference range, which indicates how much of a certain mineral or vitamin should be present in a healthy individual. This helps you to quickly identify any discrepancies.

Lab testing for mineral deficiencies can be an important preventative step in maintaining your health. These tests can evaluate your blood, plasma, or red blood cells.

Whole blood mineral tests are tests that use a whole blood specimen to measure mineral levels. These tests include:

Serum mineral tests are tests that check for mineral levels within the serum of your blood. These tests include:

Plasma mineral tests are tests that check for mineral levels within the plasma of your blood. These tests include:

Red blood cell (RBC) mineral tests are tests that check for mineral levels within or on your red blood cells. These tests include:

Using Ulta Lab Tests, you can order your tests online, visit one of our patient centers where a phlebotomist will draw your blood, and review your results from home within 48 hours.

Benefits of Mineral Deficiency Lab Testing with Ulta Lab Tests

Whether you have a history of mineral deficiencies or simply suspect that your diet isn't getting you all of the necessary vitamins and minerals, get peace of mind with a mineral blood test.

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable, so you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are a few great things to love about Ulta Lab Tests:

  • You'll get secure and confidential results
  • You don't need health insurance
  • You don't need a physician's referral
  • You'll get affordable pricing
  • We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee

Order your essential mineral lab tests today, and your results will be provided to you securely and confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

Take control with Ulta Lab Tests today!