Neuropathy

The neuropathy tests include a complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic profile, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, fasting blood glucose, vitamin B12, and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels; to detect vitamin deficiencies, diabetes, abnormal immune function and other indications of conditions that can cause peripheral neuropathy.  Ulta Lab Tests provides affordable, reliable blood work and secure and confidential testing, so order today.


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Serum albumin measurements are used in the monitoring and treatment of numerous diseases involving those related to nutrition and pathology particularly in the liver and kidney. Serum albumin is valuable when following response to therapy where improvement in the serum albumin level is the best sign of successful medical treatment. There may be a loss of albumin in the gastrointestinal tract, in the urine secondary to renal damage or direct loss of albumin through the skin. More than 50% of patients with gluten enteropathy have depressed albumin. The only cause of increased albumin is dehydration; there is no naturally occurring hyperalbuminemia

Serum alkaline phosphatase levels are of interest in the diagnosis of hepatobiliary disorders and bone disease associated with increased osteoblastic activity. Moderate elevations of alkaline phosphatase may be seen in several conditions that do not involve the liver or bone. Among these are Hodgkin's disease, congestive heart failure, ulcerative colitis, regional enteritis, and intra-abdominal bacterial infections. Elevations are also observed during the third trimester of pregnancy.


AST is widely distributed throughout the tissues with significant amounts being in the heart and liver. Lesser amounts are found in skeletal muscles, kidneys, pancreas, spleen, lungs, and brain. Injury to these tissues results in the release of the AST enzyme to general circulation. In myocardial infarction, serum AST may begin to rise within 6-8 hours after onset, peak within two days and return to normal by the fourth or fifth day post infarction. An increase in serum AST is also found with hepatitis, liver necrosis, cirrhosis, and liver metastasis.

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Measurement of the levels of bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

Measurement of the levels of bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstructive disease

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia, and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported.

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel


Intrauterine or congenital CMV infections occur in 0.5 to 2.2% of all live births. Symptomatic congenital infections usually occur in infants born to nonimmune mothers who have primary infections during pregnancy. Latency and reactivation of CMV influence the interpretation of serological results. A single positive CMV IgG result is and indication of present or past infection. The presence of CMV IgM suggests a recent CMV exposure but does not differentiate between primary infection and reactivation.

CMV infections are common and usually asymptomatic. In patients who are immunocompromised, CMV may cause disseminated, severe disease. CMV may cause birth defects in a minority of infected newborns. Antibody IgG may represent prior exposure or recent infection if there is a significant change in titer between acute and convalescent specimens.

CMV infections are common and usually asymptomatic. In patients who are immunocompromised, CMV may cause disseminated, severe disease. CMV may cause birth defects in a minority of infected newborns.


Clinical Significance

Used to evaluate diphtheria immunization response. Antibody levels of > or = to 0.10 IU/mL are considered protective. For Pre and Post vaccination testing to assess normal immune response, please refer to Test Code 10680, Diphtheria Antitoxoid, Pre and Post Vaccination.

 

Alternative Name(s)

DPT Titer,Anti Diphtheria


Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Antibody Panel

Includes: Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgM), Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgG), Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

Clinical Significance: Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgM is typically detectable at clinical presentation, then declines to undetectable levels within a month in young children and within 3 months in other individuals. VCA-IgG is typically detectable at clinical presentation, and persists for life. EBNA IgG typically appears during convalescence (3-4 months after clinical presentation) and remains detectable for life.

EBV-VCA IgG/IgM (viral capsid antigen): A positive IgG means you’ve had or currently have the infection; A positive IgM means the virus has been reactivated.

EBV-EBNA IgG (nuclear antigen): A positive test result is usually associated with past infections.

Reference Range(s)

Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgM)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <36.00 Negative
  • 36.00-43.99Equivocal
  • >43.99Positive


Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive


Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive

Alternative Name(s)

EBV Comprehensive,Infectious Mononucleosis Panel

 


Epstein-Barr Virus DNA, Real-Time PCR is useful in assessing active disease. Central nervous system infections can be diagnosed with CSF specimens.

Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgG is typically detectable at clinical presentation, and persists for life. Absence of VCA-IgG usually indicates the patient is susceptible to EBV infection.

Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgM is typically detectable at clinical presentation, then declines to undetectable levels within a month in young children and within 3 months in other individuals.

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Serum glucose levels may be abnormally high (hyperglycemia) or abnormally low (hypoglycemia). Glucose measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment of carbohydrate metabolic disorders including diabetes mellitus, idiopathic hypoglycemia, and pancreatic islet cell neoplasm.

Excessive exposure to heavy metals can cause acute chronic toxicity. Heavy metals panel is intended to evaluate and monitor exposure to heavy metals and evaluate the process of detoxification. Excessive cadmium exposure can damage lungs, kidneys, and the digestive tract.

Includes

Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, Creatinine

Patient Preparation

Avoid seafood consumption for 48 hours prior to collection


Excessive exposure to Heavy Metals can cause acute and chronic toxicity. Heavy Metals Panel is intended to evaluate and monitor exposure to heavy metals and evaluate the process of detoxification.

Useful in the diagnosis of toxicity due to Arsenic, Lead or Mercury.

Includes

Arsenic, Mercury, Lead, Creatinine

Patient Preparation

Avoid seafood consumption for 48 hours prior to collection

Excessive exposure to heavy metals can cause acute and chronic toxicity. Heavy Metals Panel is intended to evaluate and monitor exposure to heavy metals and evaluate the process of detoxification.


A Hemoglobin (Hb) A1c Blood Test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood. The A1c test will help determine whether you are at a higher risk of developing diabetes; to help diagnose diabetes and prediabetes; to monitor diabetes and to aid in treatment decisions.

To assist with control of blood glucose levels, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended glycated hemoglobin testing (HbA1c) twice a year for patients with stable glycemia, and quarterly for patients with poor glucose control. Interpretative ranges are based on ADA guidelines.



More than 20 million people in the United States struggle with neuropathy. These individuals experience pain and weakness that come from a defect in the nervous system.

Unfortunately, there's no cure for neuropathy. However, there are some available treatments that work better for patients who identify their condition early on.

Neuropathy lab tests are the best way to determine whether or not you have neuropathy or are currently developing it.

To learn more about neuropathy and the neuropathy tests that you need for a diagnosis, keep reading.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition of the nervous system that's associated with nerve damage. The condition can stand alone or develop as a result of another condition.

A couple of the common conditions that may cause neuropathy are diabetes and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Some patients may even develop neuropathy as a side effect of treatments like chemotherapy.

Neuropathy is also called peripheral neuropathy. Although peripheral neuropathy is localized to the legs and arms, neuropathy can occur anywhere in the body.

Neuropathy does not have a singular cause or symptom. It's a set of symptoms that occurs because of a few different processes happening in the body. 

Unfortunately, neuropathy is not curable. However, there are steps that you can take to prevent the condition before you develop it as well as steps that you can take to prevent the condition from worsening after you develop it.

Risk Factors for Neuropathy

The risk factors for neuropathy are linked to previous medical history and current lifestyle choices. Here are the common risk factors associated with neuropathy:

  • Diabetes
  • Cancer
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Vitamin B deficiency
  • Copper deficiency
  • Nutrient excess
  • Exposure to toxins

If you have any of these risk factors, it's important to let your health provider know so that they can better care for you. While having these conditions isn't guaranteed to lead to neuropathy, they are strongly correlated with them. 

Causes of Neuropathy

The most common cause of neuropathy is diabetes. Because of the changes in the blood that happen with the condition, it can lead to numbness and tingling in the legs and arms.

Cancer patients can experience chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The chemo treatment kills fast-growing cells in the body. Unfortunately, it can go after some of your healthy cells as well.

Getting these treatments over time can cause damage to the nervous system as nerve cells die.

Autoimmune diseases can also cause neuropathy. People with these conditions have an immune system that is attacking healthy cells. Sometimes, this includes healthy nerve cells.

Infectious diseases can lead to neuropathy as well. Like with the HIV/AIDS virus, these infectious agents can cause damage to the nervous system over time.

Those people with HIV or AIDS can develop the condition from the virus, while others develop it from the medications that providers use to contain the virus.

Nutrition problems, including deficiencies, malnutrition, excess, and alcoholism can cause neuropathy as well. The imbalance within the body causes problems with the nerve cells, eventually leading to neuropathy.

Repetitive stress, inflammation, and irritation can also cause nerve problems. If you've had an injury in the past, you could be at risk of developing neuropathy.

Lastly, we should point out idiopathic neuropathy and genetic neuropathy. Idiopathic neuropathy has no known cause, while genetic neuropathy is passed down through families.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Neuropathy?

The signs and symptoms that a patient gets from neuropathy will depend on how advanced it is and what kind of neuropathy they have. Here are some of the most common signs and symptoms for patients with neuropathy:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Burning
  • Sensitivity to touch
  • Pain
  • Muscle weakness

Usually, these signs and symptoms occur in the arms and/or legs. However, the location of these signs and symptoms depends on the location of your neuropathy.

If the condition has a chance to develop too far, you could develop paralysis. It's important to catch the condition early.

How Is Neuropathy Diagnosed?

There are several ways that a healthcare provider can diagnose neuropathy. 

First, they could use electrodiagnostic testing. This includes a series of tests that look at the nerve function and nerve sensitivity in different areas of your body.

They can also use a needle examination, which requires using a needle to get audio and visual information about your muscle functioning.

Your healthcare provider may choose to get a skin biopsy. By look at the sample under a microscope, they can determine whether your neuropathy is associated with your nerve fibers.

Quantitive sensory testing is also an option. This can help healthcare providers determine how much damage there is to your existing nerves.

Lastly, your healthcare provider may want to run a couple of neuropathy blood tests to see if you have signs of inflammation and damage in your blood.

The Lab Tests to Screen, Diagnose, and Monitor Neuropathy

Since neuropathy is a nerve condition, there aren't many regular neuropathy lab tests. However, there are a few tests that can help your provider determine the kind of neuropathy that you have. These include the following:

By getting these kinds of tests, you can take the next steps when it comes to controlling your neuropathy. By knowing how it developed, you and your healthcare provider can make better decisions about your future health. This means that you may be able to slow down the development of the condition or even help with symptoms.

Get Your Neuropathy Lab Tests at Ulta Lab Tests

If you think that you may have neuropathy, you should get neuropathy lab tests sooner rather than later. If you get a diagnosis now, you can take the necessary steps to get it under control before you experience signs like paralysis.

Luckily, you can get neuropathy lab tests at Ulta Lab Tests. We can help you figure out whether or not you're at risk for the condition. If you are, you should have a conversation with your healthcare provider about controlling the disease.

Ulta Lab Tests offers highly accurate and reliable tests, so you can make informed decisions about your health. Benefits of using Ulta Lab Tests include:

  • 2100 patient service centers across the nation
  • Secure and confidential results delivered to you in 24 to 48 hours for most tests
  • No insurance required
  • No doctor’s referral required
  • A 100% satisfaction guarantee

Take control of your health today with neuropathy labs tests from Ulta Lab Tests.