Pancreatitis

Pancreatitis Lab Testing and health information

Do you have sudden, unexplained pain in your abdomen?

Order from Ulta Lab Tests pancreatitis tests to check the amylase and lipase enzymes in your bloodstream to detect pancreatitis.

Pancreatitis is a disease that causes inflammation of the pancreas that causes severe abdominal pain, and can lead to death. It can be acute or chronic, and it's often caused by gallstones or excessive alcohol use. It usually occurs when there's a build-up of fluid in the pancreas, which could mean that your body has been storing too much alcohol or sugar. It's important to get tested for pancreatitis if you are experiencing any of these symptoms. Early detection is key to preventing pancreatic cancer, so if you think you might have this condition, get tested today!

In addition to abdominal pain, symptoms can include nausea and vomiting, fever, rapid heart rate, and low blood pressure. The most common cause of pancreatitis is gallstones or excessive alcohol use. However, there are other possible causes as well including trauma to the abdomen (such as from an automobile accident), infections in the pancreas or surrounding areas (such as pneumonia), medications such as steroids or valproic acid (Depakote) used for seizures or bipolar disorder, certain cancers including lymphoma and leukemia, autoimmune diseases such as lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis that affect your immune system's ability to fight off infection; inherited disorders that can damage your pancreas over time; obesity; diabetes mellitus type 2; hypertriglyceridemia which means high levels of triglycerides in your bloodstream; hypothyroidism which means low thyroid hormone production by your thyroid gland leading to weight gain even though you eat little food because you feel full quickly after eating small amounts of food due to slowed metabolism caused by lower thyroid function ; chronic kidney disease ; cirrhosis which means scarring of liver tissue from long-term damage due to hepatitis B virus , hepatitis C virus , alcoholism , nonalcoholic fatty liver disease , hemochromatosis which means excess iron storage in organs throughout the body causing organ.

If you want to learn more about the condition of pancreatitis and the lab tests that can help you, click on the title of the article below.

Pancreatitis and Lab Testing - What You Need to Know

Do you have an elevated amylase level?

Amylase is an enzyme produced by your salivary glands, stomach, small intestine, and pancreas. When there's inflammation in your body or damage to your pancreas, it releases more enzymes into the bloodstream than usual. This test measures how much amylase is in your blood at one time so doctors can determine whether or not you have pancreatitis. If they find high levels of amylase in your blood sample, then they will likely order a lipase test as well because this enzyme can be found together with amylase during pancreatic diseases such as acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis (pancreatic cancer). 

The lipase test measures how much lipase is present in the bloodstream when there may be problems with the pancreas or digestive system causing fat malabsorption issues like steatorrhea (fatty stools) due to lack of bile flow from blocked bile ducts caused by gallstones or tumor compression on the common bile duct resulting in jaundice (yellowing skin/eyes), pale stools and dark urine coloration; all signs associated with obstructive jaundice syndrome

The Pancreatic Cancer Research Foundation recommends routine testing for pancreatitis in people with symptoms, including abdominal pain and weight loss. The best way to prevent pancreatitis is through early diagnosis and treatment. Our tests will help you determine if you have this condition so you can obtain the proper care for yourself before it becomes worse! 

Ulta Lab Tests is dedicated to assisting you in understanding your health! We provide discounted lab tests online 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with Quest Diagnostics results delivered in 24 to 48 hours for most tests. We also have 2,000 lab tests and 2100 testing sites around the country! 

Order your blood tests to detect, diagnose and monitor pancreatitis from the selection below today and take charge of your health!


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Description: Amylase is a blood test that is used to measure the amount of amylase in the blood’s serum. It is used to assess for and detect a pancreatic disorder.

Also Known As: Amy Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Amylase test ordered?

When a person displays symptoms of a pancreatic disease, a blood amylase test may be conducted.

  • Abdominal or back pain that is severe
  • Fever
  • Appetite loss.
  • Nausea

A urine amylase test may be requested in conjunction with or after a blood amylase test. A health practitioner may conduct one or both of these tests on a regular basis to evaluate the success of treatment and see whether amylase levels are increasing or decreasing over time.

What does an Amylase blood test check for?

Amylase is one of numerous pancreatic enzymes that aid in carbohydrate digestion. This test detects the presence of amylase in the blood.

Amylase is produced from the pancreas into the duodenum, the first region of the small intestine, where it aids in the digestion of carbohydrates. Other organs, including the salivary glands, generate it as well.

Amylase is normally found in modest amounts in the blood and urine. Increased levels of amylase are released into the blood when pancreatic cells are harmed, as in pancreatitis, or when the pancreatic duct is obstructed by a gallstone or, in rare situations, a pancreatic tumor. This raises amylase levels in the blood.

Lab tests often ordered with an Amylase test:

  • Lipase
  • Trypsin
  • Trypsinogen

Conditions where an Amylase test is recommended:

  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Pancreatic Diseases
  • Pancreatitis

How does my health care provider use an Amylase test?

An amylase test is used to identify and track acute pancreatitis. It's frequently ordered in conjunction with a lipase test. It can also be used to detect and track chronic pancreatitis and other pancreas-related conditions.

A urine amylase test may be requested as well. Its level will usually correspond to blood amylase concentrations, but the rise and decrease will occur later. A urine creatinine clearance test may be ordered in conjunction with a urine amylase test to determine the ratio of amylase to creatinine filtered by the kidneys. Because poor kidney function might result in a decreased rate of amylase clearance, this ratio is used to assess renal function.

An amylase test on peritoneal fluid may be used to assist diagnose pancreatitis in some instances, such as when there is a buildup of fluid in the abdomen.

Amylase tests are often used to track the progress of pancreatic cancer treatment and after gallstone resection that has resulted in gallbladder attacks.

What do my Amylase test results mean?

A high level of amylase in the blood may suggest the presence of a pancreas problem.

Amylase levels in the blood often rise to 4 to 6 times higher than the highest reference value, also known as the upper limit of normal, in acute pancreatitis. The increase happens within 4 to 8 hours following a pancreas damage and usually lasts until the cause is effectively treated. In a few days, the amylase levels will return to normal.

Amylase levels in chronic pancreatitis are initially fairly increased, although they frequently decline over time as the pancreas deteriorates. Returning to normal levels may not signal that the source of damage has been rectified in this scenario. The size of the amylase rise does not indicate the severity of pancreatic illness.

Amylase levels may also be elevated in persons who have pancreatic duct obstruction or pancreatic cancer.

Urine amylase levels rise in lockstep with blood amylase levels and remain elevated for several days after blood levels have returned to normal.

A high amount of amylase in the peritoneal fluid can indicate acute pancreatitis, but it can also indicate other abdominal problems including a clogged intestine or poor blood supply to the intestines.

A low amylase level in the blood and urine of a person with pancreatitis symptoms could indicate that the amylase-producing cells in the pancreas have been permanently damaged. Reduced levels can also be caused by renal illness or pregnancy toxemia.

Increased blood amylase levels along with normal to low urine amylase levels could indicate the presence of a macroamylase, a harmless compound of amylase and other proteins that builds up in the bloodstream.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: A Lipase test is used to measure the amount of lipase in the blood’s serum. Lipase is an enzyme that is produced by the pancreas. This test can be used to help diagnose acute pancreatic diseases and monitor chronic ones. It can also be used to measure the progress of pancreatic disease treatment.

Also Known As: LPS Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Lipase test ordered?

When a person shows signs of acute pancreatitis or another pancreatic condition, a lipase test may be recommended.

It may also be ordered at regular intervals when a doctor wishes to monitor someone with a pancreatic issue to see how well medication is working and whether lipase levels are rising or falling over time.

What does a Lipase blood test check for?

Lipase is one of numerous pancreatic enzymes that aid in the digestion of dietary lipids. This test determines how much lipase is present in the blood.

Lipase travels from the pancreas to the first portion of the small intestine, where it aids in the breakdown of dietary lipids into fatty acids. Lipase is produced mostly by the pancreas, but it is also produced by cells in the tongue, stomach, and liver, which are all involved in digestion and nutritional absorption.

Lipase is normally found in modest amounts in the blood. When pancreatic cells are harmed, as in pancreatitis, or the pancreatic duct is obstructed by a gallstone or, in rare situations, a pancreatic tumor, more lipase enters the bloodstream, resulting in greater blood concentrations.

Lab tests often ordered with a Lipase test:

  • Amylase
  • Trypsin
  • Trypsinogen

Conditions where a Lipase test is recommended:

  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Diabetes
  • Pancreatic Diseases
  • Pancreatitis
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Celiac Disease
  • Crohn Disease

How does my health care provider use a Lipase test?

To diagnose and monitor acute pancreatitis, a blood test for lipase is frequently performed in conjunction with an amylase test. It can also be used to diagnose and monitor chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic illnesses, but it isn't as good a test for these conditions because lipase levels stay raised for extended periods of time and don't always reflect clinical progress.

Lipase testing is sometimes used to diagnose and monitor cystic fibrosis, celiac disease, and Crohn's disease.

What do my Lipase test results mean?

A high lipase level in the blood could suggest the presence of a pancreas problem.

Lipase levels are usually quite high in acute pancreatitis, generally 5 to 10 times higher than the maximum reference point. Lipase levels normally rise within 4 to 8 hours of an acute pancreatitis incident and stay high for 7 to 14 days. The severity of an acute pancreatic attack cannot be determined by lipase levels.

Pancreatic duct obstruction, pancreatic cancer, and other pancreatic illnesses, as well as gallbladder inflammation and renal dysfunction, can raise concentrations.

Lipase levels in the blood may suggest persistent damage to the pancreas' lipase-producing cells. This can happen in pancreas-related chronic disorders like cystic fibrosis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: A Magnesium test is a blood test that measures magnesium levels in your blood’s serum and is useful in determining the cause of abnormal levels of magnesium, calcium, and or potassium, and is useful in the evaluation of a wide variety of disorders such as diabetes, kidney disease, and malabsorption.

Also Known As: Magnesium Serum Test, Mg Test, Mag Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Magnesium test ordered?

Magnesium tests may be requested by health professionals as a follow-up to chronically low calcium and potassium levels in the blood. It may also be ordered if a person is experiencing muscle weakness, cramping, twitching, disorientation, seizures, or cardiac arrhythmias, which could be caused by a magnesium deficit.

As part of an evaluation of malabsorption, malnutrition, diarrhea, or alcoholism, a health practitioner may prescribe a magnesium level to check for a deficit. Testing may also be done if someone is taking drugs that cause the kidneys to excrete magnesium. When magnesium and/or calcium supplementation is required, the level of magnesium in the blood can be measured at regular intervals to ensure that the medication is working.

A magnesium test, along with kidney function tests such as a BUN and creatinine, may be given on a regular basis when someone has a kidney problem or uncontrolled diabetes to help monitor renal function and ensure that the person is not excreting or retaining excessive quantities of magnesium.

What does a Magnesium Serum test check for?

The magnesium test measures the amount of magnesium in your blood’s serum. Magnesium is a mineral that supports healthy bones, neuron function, muscle contraction and energy production. It enters the body through the diet and is then processed by the small intestine and colon. Tissues, cells, and bones all contain the element magnesium. It is challenging to determine the total magnesium content from blood tests alone since only 1% of the magnesium present in the body is accessible in the blood. However, this test is still useful for figuring out a person's magnesium levels.

Small levels of magnesium can be found in a range of meals, including green vegetables like spinach, whole grains, and nuts. Magnesium is commonly found in foods that contain dietary fiber. The body regulates how much magnesium it receives and excretes or conserves in the kidneys to keep its magnesium level stable.

Magnesium deficiency can occur as a result of malnutrition, malabsorption-related disorders, or excessive magnesium loss via the kidneys. Magnesium overload can occur as a result of taking magnesium-containing antacids or a decrease in the kidneys' ability to eliminate magnesium.

There may be no or few nonspecific symptoms in someone with mild to severe magnesium insufficiency. Loss of appetite, nausea, muscle cramps, confusion, exhaustion, seizures, changes in heart rate, and tingling or numbness are all symptoms of persistent or severe deficits. They can also wreak havoc on calcium metabolism and worsen calcium deficiency. Muscle weakness, nausea, loss of hunger or cravings, and an erratic heart rate are some of the symptoms of excess magnesium, which are similar to those of deficiency.

Lab tests often ordered with a Magnesium test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Calcium
  • Iron Total and Total Iron binding capacity
  • Potassium
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lipid Panel
  • Phosphorus
  • Parathyroid Hormone
  • Vitamin D
  • Glucose

Conditions where a Magnesium test is recommended:

  • Hypomagnesemia
  • Hypermagnesemia
  • Kidney Disease
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Diabetes
  • Alcoholism
  • Malnutrition
  • Malabsorption
  • Diarrhea
  • Dehydration
  • Parathyroid Diseases
  • Addison Disease
  • Adrenal Insufficiency

How does my health care provider use a Magnesium test?

Magnesium levels in the blood are measured with a magnesium test. Atypical magnesium levels are most frequently found in conditions or illnesses that result in insufficient or excessive renal excretion of magnesium or impaired intestinal absorption of magnesium. Magnesium levels can be measured to determine the severity of kidney issues, uncontrolled diabetes, as well as to diagnose gastrointestinal diseases.

Because a low magnesium blood level can lead to chronically low calcium and potassium levels over time, it may be tested to help diagnose calcium, phosphorus, potassium, and/or parathyroid hormone – another component of calcium regulation – problems.

Magnesium levels can be checked on a regular basis to monitor the response to oral or intravenous magnesium supplements, and calcium supplementation can be monitored using calcium and phosphorus tests.

What does my Magnesium test result mean?

Low magnesium levels in the blood can suggest that a person isn't getting enough magnesium or is excreting too much. Deficiencies are most commonly encountered in:

  • Low nutritional intake 
  • Gastrointestinal conditions
  • Diabetes that is uncontrolled
  • Hypoparathyroidism
  • Use of a diuretic for a long time
  • diarrhea that lasts for a long time
  • Following surgery
  • Burns that are severe
  • Pregnancy toxicity

Magnesium levels in the blood are rarely elevated as a result of food sources, but rather as a result of an excretion problem or excessive supplementation. Increased levels can be cause by:

  • Failure of the kidneys
  • Hyperparathyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Dehydration
  • Diabetic acidosis
  • Addison's disese
  • Use of antacids or laxatives containing magnesium

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A Lipid Panel is a blood test that measures your cholesterol levels to evaluate your risk of cardiovascular disease. 

Also Known As: Lipid Profile Test, Lipid Test, Cholesterol Profile Test, Cholesterol Panel Test, Cholesterol Test, Coronary Risk Panel Test, lipid blood test 

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Serum 

Test Preparation: Patient should be fasting 9-12 hours prior to collection.

When is a Lipid Panel test ordered?  

A fasting lipid profile should be done about every five years in healthy persons who have no additional risk factors for heart disease. A single total cholesterol test, rather than a complete lipid profile, may be used for initial screening. If the screening cholesterol test result is high, a lipid profile will almost certainly be performed. 

More regular testing with a full lipid profile is indicated if other risk factors are present or if earlier testing revealed a high cholesterol level. 

Other risk factors, in addition to high LDL cholesterol, include: 

  • Smoking 
  • Obesity or being overweight 
  • Unhealthy eating habits 
  • Not getting enough exercise and being physically inactive 
  • Older age 
  • Having hypertension 
  • Premature heart disease in the family 
  • Having experienced a heart attack or having pre-existing heart disease 

Diabetes or pre-diabetes is a condition in which a person has High HDL is a "negative risk factor," and its existence permits one risk factor to be removed from the total. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine lipid testing for children and young adults. Children and teenagers who are at a higher risk of developing heart disease as adults should be screened with a lipid profile earlier and more frequently. A family history of heart disease or health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or being overweight are some of the risk factors, which are comparable to those in adults. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, high-risk children should be examined with a fasting lipid profile between the ages of 2 and 8. 

A lipid profile can also be done at regular intervals to assess the effectiveness of cholesterol-lowering lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, as well as pharmacological therapy like statins. 

What does a Lipid Panel blood test check for? 

Lipids are a class of fats and fat-like compounds that are essential components of cells and energy sources. The level of certain lipids in the blood is measured by a lipid profile. 

Lipoprotein particles transport two key lipids, cholesterol, and triglycerides, through the bloodstream. Protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid molecules are all present in each particle. High-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, and very low-density lipoproteins are the three types of particles assessed with a lipid profile. 

It's critical to keep track of and maintain optimal levels of these lipids in order to stay healthy. While the body creates the cholesterol required for normal function, some cholesterol is obtained from the diet. A high amount of cholesterol in the blood can be caused by eating too many foods high in saturated fats and trans fats or having a hereditary tendency. The excess cholesterol may form plaques on the inside walls of blood vessels. Plaques can constrict or block blood channel openings, causing artery hardening and raising the risk of a variety of health problems, including heart disease and stroke. Although the explanation for this is unknown, a high level of triglycerides in the blood is linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. 

A lipid profile consists of the following elements: 

  • Cholesterol total 
  • HDL Cholesterol -?commonly referred to as "good cholesterol" since it eliminates excess cholesterol from the body and transports it to the liver for elimination. 
  • LDL Cholesterol -?commonly referred to as "bad cholesterol" because it deposits excess cholesterol in the walls of blood arteries, contributing to atherosclerosis. 
  • Triglycerides 

Lab tests often ordered with a Lipid Panel test:

  • CBC (Blood Count Test) with Smear Review
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Direct LDL
  • VLDL
  • Lp-PLA2
  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation Ion Mobility (LDL Particle Testing)

Conditions where a Lipid Panel test is recommended:

  • Hypertension
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How does my health care provider use a Lipid Panel test? 

The lipid profile is used as part of a cardiac risk assessment to help determine an individual's risk of heart disease and, if there is a borderline or high risk, to help make treatment options. 

Lipids are a class of fats and fat-like compounds that are essential components of cells and energy sources. It's critical to keep track of and maintain optimal levels of these lipids in order to stay healthy. 

To design a therapy and follow-up strategy, the results of the lipid profile are combined with other recognized risk factors for heart disease. Treatment options may include lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, as well as lipid-lowering drugs such as statins, depending on the results and other risk factors. 

A normal lipid profile test measures the following elements: 

  • Total cholesterol is a test that determines how much cholesterol is present in all lipoprotein particles. 

  • HDL Cholesterol — measures hdl cholesterol in particles, sometimes referred to as "good cholesterol" since it eliminates excess cholesterol and transports it to the liver for elimination. 

  • LDL Cholesterol – estimates the cholesterol in LDL particles; sometimes known as "bad cholesterol" since it deposits excess cholesterol in blood vessel walls, contributing to atherosclerosis. The amount of LDL Cholesterol is usually estimated using the total cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, and triglycerides readings. 

  • Triglycerides – triglycerides are measured in all lipoprotein particles, with the highest concentration in very-low-density lipoproteins. 

  • As part of the lipid profile, several extra information may be presented. The results of the above-mentioned tests are used to determine these parameters. 

  • VLDL Cholesterol — derived using triglycerides/5; this calculation is based on the typical VLDL particle composition. 

  • Non-HDL Cholesterol - the result of subtracting total cholesterol from HDL Cholesterol. 

  • Cholesterol/HDL ratio — total cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol ratio computed. 

An expanded profile may include the amount and concentration of low-density lipoprotein particles. Rather than assessing the amount of LDL cholesterol, this test counts the number of LDL particles. This figure is thought to more accurately reflect the risk of heart disease in some persons. 

What do my Lipid Panel test results mean? 

Healthy lipid levels, in general, aid in the maintenance of a healthy heart and reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. A health practitioner would analyze the results of each component of a lipid profile, as well as other risk factors, to assess a person's total risk of coronary heart disease, if therapy is required, and, if so, which treatment will best serve to reduce the person's risk of heart disease. 

The Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program published guidelines for measuring lipid levels and selecting treatment in 2002. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association announced updated cholesterol therapy guidelines in 2013 to minimize the risk of cardiovascular disease in adults. These guidelines suggest a different treatment method than the NCEP guidelines. Cholesterol-lowering medications are now chosen based on the 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and other criteria, rather than on LDL Cholesterol or non-HDL Cholesterol objectives. 

The revised guidelines include an evidence-based risk calculator for ASCVD that may be used to identify people who are most likely to benefit from treatment. It's for adults between the ages of 40 and 79 who don't have a heart condition. The computation takes into account a number of characteristics, including age, gender, race, total cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking habits. The new guidelines also suggest comparing therapeutic response to LDL Cholesterol baseline readings, with decrease criteria varying depending on the degree of lipid-lowering medication therapy. 

Unhealthy lipid levels, as well as the presence of additional risk factors like age, family history, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and high blood pressure, may indicate that the person being examined needs to be treated. 

The NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines specify target LDL cholesterol levels based on the findings of lipid testing and these other main risk factors. Individuals with LDL Cholesterol levels over the target limits will be treated, according to the guidelines. 

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, screening youths with risk factors for heart disease with a full, fasting lipid panel is advised. Fasting is not required prior to lipid screening in children who do not have any risk factors. For non-fasting lipid screening, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is the preferred test. Non HDL Cholesterol is computed by subtracting total cholesterol and HDL Cholesterol from total cholesterol and HDL Cholesterol. 

Is there anything else I should know? 

The measurement of triglycerides in people who haven't fasted is gaining popularity. Because most of the day, blood lipid levels reflect post-meal levels rather than fasting levels, a non-fasting sample may be more representative of the "usual" circulating level of triglyceride. However, because it is still unclear how to interpret non-fasting levels for assessing risk, the current recommendations for fasting before lipid tests remain unchanged. 

A fasting lipid profile is usually included in a routine cardiac risk assessment. In addition, research into the utility of additional non-traditional cardiac risk markers, such as Lp-PLA2, is ongoing. A health care provider may use one or more of these markers to help determine a person's risk, but there is no consensus on how to use them and they are not widely available. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A Lipid Panel is a blood test that measures your cholesterol levels to evaluate your risk of cardiovascular disease.

Also Known As: Lipid Profile Test, Lipid Test, Cholesterol Profile Test, Cholesterol Panel Test, Cholesterol Test, Coronary Risk Panel Test, lipid blood test, Lipid w/Ratios Test, Cholesterol Ratio test, blood cholesterol Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Patient should be fasting 9-12 hours prior to collection.

When is a Lipid Panel with Ratios test ordered?

A fasting lipid profile should be done about every five years in healthy persons who have no additional risk factors for heart disease. A single total cholesterol test, rather than a complete lipid profile, may be used for initial screening. If the screening cholesterol test result is high, a lipid profile will almost certainly be performed.

More regular testing with a full lipid profile is indicated if other risk factors are present or if earlier testing revealed a high cholesterol level.

Other risk factors, in addition to high LDL cholesterol, include:

  • Smoking
  • Obesity or being overweight
  • Unhealthy eating habits
  • Not getting enough exercise and being physically inactive
  • Older age
  • Having hypertension
  • Premature heart disease in the family
  • Having experienced a heart attack or having pre-existing heart disease

Diabetes or pre-diabetes is a condition in which a person has High HDL is a "negative risk factor," and its existence permits one risk factor to be removed from the total.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine lipid testing for children and young adults. Children and teenagers who are at a higher risk of developing heart disease as adults should be screened with a lipid profile earlier and more frequently. A family history of heart disease or health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or being overweight are some of the risk factors, which are comparable to those in adults. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, high-risk children should be examined with a fasting lipid profile between the ages of 2 and 8.

A lipid profile can also be done at regular intervals to assess the effectiveness of cholesterol-lowering lifestyle changes like diet and exercise, as well as pharmacological therapy like statins.

What does a Lipid Panel with Ratios blood test check for?

Lipids are a class of fats and fat-like compounds that are essential components of cells and energy sources. The level of certain lipids in the blood is measured by a lipid profile.

Lipoprotein particles transport two key lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, through the bloodstream. Protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid molecules are all present in each particle. High-density lipoproteins, low-density lipoproteins, and very low-density lipoproteins are the three types of particles assessed with a lipid profile.

It's critical to keep track of and maintain optimal levels of these lipids in order to stay healthy. While the body creates the cholesterol required for normal function, some cholesterol is obtained from the diet. A high amount of cholesterol in the blood can be caused by eating too many foods high in saturated fats and trans fats or having a hereditary tendency. The excess cholesterol may form plaques on the inside walls of blood vessels. Plaques can constrict or block blood channel openings, causing artery hardening and raising the risk of a variety of health problems, including heart disease and stroke. Although the explanation for this is unknown, a high level of triglycerides in the blood is linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

A lipid profile consists of the following elements:

  • Cholesterol total
  • HDL Cholesterol - commonly referred to as "good cholesterol" since it eliminates excess cholesterol from the body and transports it to the liver for elimination.
  • LDL Cholesterol - commonly referred to as "bad cholesterol" because it deposits excess cholesterol in the walls of blood arteries, contributing to atherosclerosis.
  • Triglycerides
  • Ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol

Lab tests often ordered with a Lipid Panel with Ratios test:

  • CBC (Blood Count Test) with Smear Review
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Direct LDL
  • VLDL
  • Lp-PLA2
  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation Ion Mobility (LDL Particle Testing)

Conditions where a Lipid Panel with Ratios test is recommended:

  • Hypertension
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a Lipid Panel with Ratios test?

The lipid profile is used as part of a cardiac risk assessment to help determine an individual's risk of heart disease and, if there is a borderline or high risk, to help make treatment options.

Lipids are a class of fats and fat-like compounds that are essential components of cells and energy sources. It's critical to keep track of and maintain optimal levels of these lipids in order to stay healthy.

To design a therapy and follow-up strategy, the results of the lipid profile are combined with other recognized risk factors for heart disease. Treatment options may include lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise, as well as lipid-lowering drugs such as statins, depending on the results and other risk factors.

A normal lipid profile test measures the following elements:

  • Total cholesterol is a test that determines how much cholesterol is present in all lipoprotein particles.
  • HDL Cholesterol — measures hdl cholesterol in particles, sometimes referred to as "good cholesterol" since it eliminates excess cholesterol and transports it to the liver for elimination.
  • LDL Cholesterol – estimates the cholesterol in LDL particles; sometimes known as "bad cholesterol" since it deposits excess cholesterol in blood vessel walls, contributing to atherosclerosis. The amount of LDL Cholesterol is usually estimated using the total cholesterol, HDL Cholesterol, and triglycerides readings.
  • Triglycerides – triglycerides are measured in all lipoprotein particles, with the highest concentration in very-low-density lipoproteins.
  • As part of the lipid profile, several extra information may be presented. The results of the above-mentioned tests are used to determine these parameters.
  • VLDL Cholesterol — derived using triglycerides/5; this calculation is based on the typical VLDL particle composition.
  • Non-HDL Cholesterol - the result of subtracting total cholesterol from HDL Cholesterol.
  • Cholesterol/HDL ratio — total cholesterol to HDL Cholesterol ratio computed.

An expanded profile may include the amount and concentration of low-density lipoprotein particles. Rather than assessing the amount of LDL cholesterol, this test counts the number of LDL particles. This figure is thought to more accurately reflect the risk of heart disease in some persons.

What do my Lipid Panel test results mean?

Healthy lipid levels, in general, aid in the maintenance of a healthy heart and reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke. A health practitioner would analyze the results of each component of a lipid profile, as well as other risk factors, to assess a person's total risk of coronary heart disease, if therapy is required, and, if so, which treatment will best serve to reduce the person's risk of heart disease.

The Adult Treatment Panel III of the National Cholesterol Education Program published guidelines for measuring lipid levels and selecting treatment in 2002. The American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association announced updated cholesterol therapy guidelines in 2013 to minimize the risk of cardiovascular disease in adults. These guidelines suggest a different treatment method than the NCEP guidelines. Cholesterol-lowering medications are now chosen based on the 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and other criteria, rather than on LDL-C or non-HDL-C objectives.

The revised guidelines include an evidence-based risk calculator for ASCVD that may be used to identify people who are most likely to benefit from treatment. It's for adults between the ages of 40 and 79 who don't have a heart condition. The computation takes into account a number of characteristics, including age, gender, race, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking habits. The new guidelines also suggest comparing therapeutic response to LDL-C baseline readings, with decrease criteria varying depending on the degree of lipid-lowering medication therapy.

Unhealthy lipid levels, as well as the presence of additional risk factors like age, family history, cigarette smoking, diabetes, and high blood pressure, may indicate that the person being examined needs to be treated.

The NCEP Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines specify target LDL cholesterol levels based on the findings of lipid testing and these other main risk factors. Individuals with LDL-C levels over the target limits will be treated, according to the guidelines.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, screening youths with risk factors for heart disease with a full, fasting lipid panel is advised. Fasting is not required prior to lipid screening in children who do not have any risk factors. For non-fasting lipid screening, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol is the preferred test. Non-HDL-C is computed by subtracting total cholesterol and HDL-C from total cholesterol and HDL-C.

Is there anything else I should know?

The measurement of triglycerides in people who haven't fasted is gaining popularity. Because most of the day, blood lipid levels reflect post-meal levels rather than fasting levels, a non-fasting sample may be more representative of the "usual" circulating level of triglyceride. However, because it is still unclear how to interpret non-fasting levels for assessing risk, the current recommendations for fasting before lipid tests remain unchanged.

A fasting lipid profile is usually included in a routine cardiac risk assessment. In addition, research into the utility of additional non-traditional cardiac risk markers, such as Lp-PLA2, is ongoing. A health care provider may use one or more of these markers to help determine a person's risk, but there is no consensus on how to use them and they are not widely available.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A CBC or Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test is a blood test that measures many important features of your blood’s red and white blood cells and platelets. A Complete Blood Count can be used to evaluate your overall health and detect a wide variety of conditions such as infection, anemia, and leukemia. It also looks at other important aspects of your blood health such as hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. 

Also Known As: CBC test, Complete Blood Count Test, Total Blood Count Test, CBC with Differential and Platelets test, Hemogram test  

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Whole Blood 

Test Preparation: No preparation required 

When is a Complete Blood Count test ordered?  

The complete blood count (CBC) is an extremely common test. When people go to the doctor for a standard checkup or blood work, they often get a CBC. Suppose a person is healthy and their results are within normal ranges. In that case, they may not need another CBC unless their health condition changes, or their healthcare professional believes it is necessary. 

When a person exhibits a variety of signs and symptoms that could be connected to blood cell abnormalities, a CBC may be done. A health practitioner may request a CBC to help diagnose and determine the severity of lethargy or weakness, as well as infection, inflammation, bruises, or bleeding. 

When a person is diagnosed with a disease that affects blood cells, a CBC is frequently done regularly to keep track of their progress. Similarly, if someone is being treated for a blood condition, a CBC may be performed on a regular basis to see if the treatment is working. 

Chemotherapy, for example, can influence the generation of cells in the bone marrow. Some drugs can lower WBC counts in the long run. To monitor various medication regimens, a CBC may be required on a regular basis. 

What does a Complete Blood Count test check for? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that determines the number of cells in circulation. White blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), and platelets (PLTs) are three types of cells suspended in a fluid called plasma. They are largely created and matured in the bone marrow and are released into the bloodstream when needed under normal circumstances. 

A CBC is mainly performed with an automated machine that measures a variety of factors, including the number of cells present in a person's blood sample. The findings of a CBC can reveal not only the quantity of different cell types but also the physical properties of some of the cells. 

Significant differences in one or more blood cell populations may suggest the presence of one or more diseases. Other tests are frequently performed to assist in determining the reason for aberrant results. This frequently necessitates visual confirmation via a microscope examination of a blood smear. A skilled laboratory technician can assess the appearance and physical features of blood cells, such as size, shape, and color, and note any anomalies. Any extra information is taken note of and communicated to the healthcare provider. This information provides the health care provider with further information about the cause of abnormal CBC results. 

The CBC focuses on three different types of cells: 

WBCs (White Blood Cells) 

The body uses five different types of WBCs, also known as leukocytes, to keep itself healthy and battle infections and other types of harm. The five different leukocytes are eosinophiles, lymphocytes, neutrophiles, basophils, and monocytes. They are found in relatively steady numbers in the blood. Depending on what is going on in the body, these values may momentarily rise or fall. An infection, for example, can cause the body to manufacture more neutrophils in order to combat bacterial infection. The amount of eosinophils in the body may increase as a result of allergies. A viral infection may cause an increase in lymphocyte production. Abnormal (immature or mature) white cells multiply fast in certain illness situations, such as leukemia, raising the WBC count. 

RBCs (Red Blood Cells) 

The bone marrow produces red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes, which are transferred into the bloodstream after maturing. Hemoglobin, a protein that distributes oxygen throughout the body, is found in these cells. Because RBCs have a 120-day lifespan, the bone marrow must constantly manufacture new RBCs to replace those that have aged and disintegrated or have been lost due to hemorrhage. A variety of diseases, including those that cause severe bleeding, can alter the creation of new RBCs and their longevity. 

The CBC measures the number of RBCs and hemoglobin in the blood, as well as the proportion of RBCs in the blood (hematocrit), and if the RBC population appears to be normal. RBCs are generally homogeneous in size and shape, with only minor differences; however, considerable variances can arise in illnesses including vitamin B12 and folate inadequacy, iron deficiency, and a range of other ailments. Anemia occurs when the concentration of red blood cells and/or the amount of hemoglobin in the blood falls below normal, resulting in symptoms such as weariness and weakness. In a far smaller percentage of cases, there may be an excess of RBCs in the blood (erythrocytosis or polycythemia). This might obstruct the flow of blood through the tiny veins and arteries in extreme circumstances. 

Platelets 

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small cell fragments that aid in the regular clotting of blood. A person with insufficient platelets is more likely to experience excessive bleeding and bruises. Excess platelets can induce excessive clotting or excessive bleeding if the platelets are not operating properly. The platelet count and size are determined by the CBC. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Complete Blood Count test: 

  • Reticulocytes
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity
  • Basic Metabolic Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lipid Panel
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate
  • Prothrombin with INR and Partial Thromboplastin Times
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Von Willebrand Factor Antigen

Conditions where a Complete Blood Count test is recommended: 

  • Anemia
  • Aplastic Anemia
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Heart Disease
  • Thalassemia
  • Leukemia
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Cancer
  • Bleeding Disorders
  • Inflammation
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Mononucleosis

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How does my health care provider use a Complete Blood Count test? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a common, comprehensive screening test used to measure a person's overall health status.  

What do my Complete Blood Count results mean? 

A low Red Blood Cell Count, also known as anemia, could be due many different causes such as chronic bleeding, a bone marrow disorder, and nutritional deficiency just to name a few. A high Red Blood Cell Count, also known as polycythemia, could be due to several conditions including lung disease, dehydration, and smoking. Both Hemoglobin and Hematocrit tend to reflect Red Blood Cell Count results, so if your Red Blood Cell Count is low, your Hematocrit and Hemoglobin will likely also be low. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Differential results mean? 

A low White Blood Cell count or low WBC count, also known as leukopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, severe infection, and lymphoma. A high White Blood Cell count, or high WBC count, also known as leukocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including infection, leukemia, and inflammation. Abnormal levels in your White Blood Cell Count will be reflected in one or more of your different white blood cells. Knowing which white blood cell types are affected will help your healthcare provider narrow down the issue. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Platelet results mean? 

A low Platelet Count, also known as thrombocytopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, viral infection, and leukemia. A high Platelet Count, also known as Thrombocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including cancer, iron deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported. Certain biomarkers do not appear in healthy individuals. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

Description: A Comprehensive Metabolic Panel or CMP is a blood test that is a combination of a Basic Metabolic Panel, a Liver Panel, and electrolyte panel, and is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a variety of conditions and diseases such as liver disease, diabetes, and kidney disease. 

Also Known As: CMP, Chem, Chem-14, Chem-12, Chem-21, Chemistry Panel, Chem Panel, Chem Screen, Chemistry Screen, SMA 12, SMA 20, SMA 21, SMAC, Chem test

Collection Method: 

Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: 

Serum 

Test Preparation: 

9-12 hours fasting is preferred. 

When is a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test ordered:  

A CMP is frequently requested as part of a lab test for a medical evaluation or yearly physical. A CMP test consists of many different tests that give healthcare providers a range of information about your health, including liver and kidney function, electrolyte balance, and blood sugar levels. To confirm or rule out a suspected diagnosis, abnormal test results are frequently followed up with other tests that provide a more in depth or targeted analysis of key areas that need investigating. 

What does a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel blood test check for? 

The complete metabolic panel (CMP) is a set of 20 tests that provides critical information to a healthcare professional about a person's current metabolic status, check for liver or kidney disease, electrolyte and acid/base balance, and blood glucose and blood protein levels. Abnormal results, particularly when they are combined, can suggest a problem that needs to be addressed. 

The following tests are included in the CMP: 

  • Albumin: this is a measure of Albumin levels in your blood. Albumin is a protein made by the liver that is responsible for many vital roles including transporting nutrients throughout the body and preventing fluid from leaking out of blood vessels. 

  • Albumin/Globulin Ratio: this is a ratio between your total Albumin and Globulin  

  • Alkaline Phosphatase: this is a measure of Alkaline phosphatase or ALP in your blood. Alkaline phosphatase is a protein found in all body tissues, however the ALP found in blood comes from the liver and bones. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage, gallbladder disease, or bone disorder. 

  • Alt: this is a measure of Alanine transaminase or ALT in your blood. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver with small amounts in the heart and muscles. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage. 

  • AST: this is a measure of Aspartate Aminotransferase or AST. Aspartate Aminotransferase is an enzyme found mostly in the heart and liver, with smaller amounts in the kidney and muscles. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage. 

  • Bilirubin, Total: this is a measure of bilirubin in your blood. Bilirubin is an orange-yellowish waste product produced from the breakdown of heme which is a component of hemoglobin found in red blood cells. The liver is responsible for removal of bilirubin from the body. 

  • Bun/Creatinine Ratio: this is a ratio between your Urea Nitrogen (BUN) result and Creatinine result.  

  • Calcium: this is a measurement of calcium in your blood. Calcium is the most abundant and one of the most important minerals in the body as it essential for proper nerve, muscle, and heart function. 

  • Calcium: is used for blood clot formation and the formation and maintenance of bones and teeth. 

  • Carbon Dioxide: this is a measure of carbon dioxide in your blood. Carbon dioxide is a negatively charged electrolyte that works with other electrolytes such as chloride, potassium, and sodium to regulate the body’s acid-base balance and fluid levels.  

  • Chloride: this is a measure of Chloride in your blood. Chloride is a negatively charged electrolyte that works with other electrolytes such as potassium and sodium to regulate the body’s acid-base balance and fluid levels. 

  • Creatinine: this is a measure of Creatinine levels in your blood. Creatinine is created from the breakdown of creatine in your muscles and is removed from your body by the kidneys. Elevated creatinine levels are often associated with kidney damage. 

  • Egfr African American: this is a measure of how well your kidneys are functioning. Glomeruli are tiny filters in your kidneys that filter out waste products from your blood for removal while retaining important substances such as nutrients and blood cells. 

  • Egfr Non-Afr. American: this is a measure of how well your kidneys are functioning. Glomeruli are tiny filters in your kidneys that filter out waste products from your blood for removal while retaining important substances such as nutrients and blood cells. 

  • Globulin: this is a measure of all blood proteins in your blood that are not albumin. 

  • Glucose: this is a measure of glucose in your blood. Glucose is created from the breakdown of carbohydrates during digestion and is the body’s primary source of energy. 

  • Potassium: this is a measure of Potassium in your blood. Potassium is an electrolyte that plays a vital role in cell metabolism, nerve and muscle function, and transport of nutrients into cells and removal of wastes products out of cells. 

  • Protein, Total: this is a measure of total protein levels in your blood. 
    Sodium: this is a measure of Sodium in your blood. Sodium is an electrolyte that plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function. 

  • Urea Nitrogen (Bun): this is a measure of Urea Nitrogen in your blood, also known as Blood UreaNitrogen (BUN). Urea is a waste product created in the liver when proteins are broken down into amino acids. Elevated levels are often associated with kidney damage. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test: 

  • Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity
  • Lipid Panel
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate
  • Prothrombin with INR and Partial Thromboplastin Times
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein

Conditions where a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test is recommended: 

  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease
  • Liver Disease
  • Hypertension

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How does my health care provider use a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test? 

The comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a broad screening tool for assessing organ function and detecting diseases like diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease. The CMP test may also be requested to monitor known disorders such as hypertension and to check for any renal or liver-related side effects in persons taking specific drugs. If a health practitioner wants to follow two or more separate CMP components, the full CMP might be ordered because it contains more information. 

What do my Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test results mean? 

The results of the tests included in the CMP are usually analyzed together to look for patterns. A single abnormal test result may indicate something different than a series of abnormal test findings. A high result on one of the liver enzyme tests, for example, is not the same as a high result on several liver enzyme tests. 

Several sets of CMPs, frequently performed on various days, may be examined to gain insights into the underlying disease and response to treatment, especially in hospitalized patients. 

Out-of-range findings for any of the CMP tests can be caused by a variety of illnesses, including kidney failure, breathing issues, and diabetes-related complications, to name a few. If any of the results are abnormal, one or more follow-up tests are usually ordered to help determine the reason and/or establish a diagnosis. 

Is there anything else I should know? 

A wide range of prescription and over-the-counter medications can have an impact on the results of the CMP's components. Any medications you're taking should be disclosed to your healthcare professional. Similarly, it is critical to provide a thorough history because many other circumstances can influence how your results are interpreted. 

What's the difference between the CMP and the BMP tests, and why would my doctor choose one over the other? 

The CMP consists of 14 tests, while the basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a subset of those with eight tests. The liver (ALP, ALT, AST, and bilirubin) and protein (albumin and total protein) tests are not included. If a healthcare provider wants a more thorough picture of a person's organ function or to check for specific illnesses like diabetes or liver or kidney disease, he or she may prescribe a CMP rather than a BMP. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Please note the following regarding BUN/Creatinine ratio: 

The lab does not report the calculation for the BUN/Creatinine Ratio unless one or both biomarkers’ results fall out of the published range. 

If you still wish to see the value, it's easy to calculate. Simply take your Urea Nitrogen (BUN) result and divide it by your Creatinine result.  

As an example, if your Urea Nitrogen result is 11 and your Creatinine result is 0.86, then you would divide 11 by 0.86 and get a BUN/Creatinine Ratio result of 12.79. 


Description: The CRP test is used to identify and/or monitor inflammation in patients.

Also Known As: CRP Test, Inflammation test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a C-Reactive Protein test ordered?

When a person's medical history and signs and symptoms indicate that they may have a significant bacterial infection, a CRP test may be recommended. When a newborn displays signs of infection or when a person has sepsis symptoms including fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate, it may be ordered.

It's also commonly requested on a regular basis to check illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and it's routinely repeated to see if medication is working. This is especially effective for inflammation issues because CRP levels decrease as inflammation decreases.

What does a C-Reactive Protein blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. After trauma or a heart attack, with active or uncontrolled autoimmune illnesses, and with acute bacterial infections like sepsis, markedly higher levels are reported. CRP levels can rise by a thousand-fold in response to inflammatory diseases, and their elevation in the blood can occur before pain, fever, or other clinical signs. The test detects inflammation caused by acute situations or monitors disease activity in chronic diseases by measuring the level of CRP in the blood.

The CRP test is not a diagnostic tool, although it can tell a doctor if inflammation is occurring. This information can be combined with other indicators like signs and symptoms, a physical exam, and other tests to establish whether someone has an acute inflammatory disorder or is having a flare-up of a chronic inflammatory disease. The health care provider may next do additional tests and treatment.

This CRP test should not be confused with the hs-CRP test. These are two separate CRP tests, each of which measures a different range of CRP levels in the blood for different purposes.

Lab tests often ordered with a C-Reactive Protein test:

  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • Procalcitonin
  • ANA
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • Complement

Conditions where a C-Reactive Protein test is recommended:

  • Arthritis
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Sepsis
  • Vasculitis
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Meningitis and Encephalitis

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a C-Reactive Protein test?

A health practitioner uses the C-reactive protein test to diagnose inflammation. CRP is an acute phase reactant, a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. The CRP test is not a diagnostic test for any ailment, but it can be used in conjunction with other tests to determine whether a person has an acute or chronic inflammatory disorder.

CRP, for example, can be used to detect or track substantial inflammation in someone who is suspected of having an acute ailment like:

  • Sepsis is a dangerous bacterial infection.
  • An infection caused by a fungus
  • Inflammation of the pelvis

People with chronic inflammatory diseases can use the CRP test to detect flare-ups and/or see if their medication is working. Here are a few examples:

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Arthritis, which can take many forms.
  • Autoimmune disorders, examples include lupus and vasculitis

CRP is occasionally requested in conjunction with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, another inflammatory test. While the CRP test is not specific enough to diagnose an illness, it does serve as a broad marker for infection and inflammation, alerting doctors to the need for more testing and treatment. A variety of additional tests may be used to determine the source of inflammation, depending on the probable cause.

What do my C-Reactive Protein test results mean?

CRP levels in the blood are usually low.

CRP levels in the blood that are high or rising indicate the existence of inflammation, but they don't tell you where it is or what's causing it. A high CRP level can establish the presence of a severe bacterial infection in people who are suspected of having one. High levels of CRP in persons with chronic inflammatory disorders indicate a flare-up or that treatment isn't working.

When the CRP level rises and then falls, it indicates that the inflammation or infection is diminishing and/or responding to treatment.

Is there anything else I should know about C-Reactive Protein?

CRP levels can rise during pregnancy, as well as with the use of birth control tablets or hormone replacement therapy. Obese people have also been found to have higher CRP levels.

In the presence of inflammation, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test will also rise; however, CRP rises first and then falls faster than the ESR.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: An antinuclear antibody screening is a blood test that is going to look for a positive or negative result. If the result comes back as positive further test will be done to look for ANA Titer and Pattern. Antinuclear antibodies are associated with Lupus.

Also Known As: ANA Test, ANA Screen IFA with Reflex to Titer and pattern IFA Test, ANA with Reflex Test, Antinuclear Antibody Screen Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

IMPORTANT Reflex Information: If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge of $13.00

When is an ANA Screen test ordered?

When someone exhibits signs and symptoms of a systemic autoimmune illness, the ANA test is requested. Symptoms of autoimmune illnesses can be vague and non-specific, and they can fluctuate over time, steadily deteriorate, or oscillate between periods of flare-ups and remissions.

What does an ANA Screen blood test check for?

Antinuclear antibodies are a type of antibody produced by the immune system when it is unable to differentiate between its own cells and foreign cells. Autoantibodies are antibodies that attack the body's own healthy cells, causing symptoms like tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle discomfort, and weariness. The moniker "antinuclear" comes from the fact that ANA specifically targets chemicals located in a cell's nucleus. The presence of these autoantibodies in the blood is detected by the ANA test.

The presence of ANA may be a sign of an autoimmune process, and it has been linked to a variety of autoimmune illnesses, the most common of which being systemic lupus erythematosus.

One of the most common tests used to detect an autoimmune disorder or rule out other conditions with comparable signs and symptoms is the ANA test. As a result, it's frequently followed by other autoantibody tests that can help establish a diagnosis. An ENA panel, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, and/or anti-histone test are examples of these.

Lab tests often ordered with an ANA Screen test:

  • ENA Panel
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Complement
  • AMA
  • Centromere antibody
  • Histone Antibody

Conditions where an ANA Screen test is recommended:

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sjogren Syndrome
  • Scleroderma

How does my health care provider use an ANA Screen test?

One of the most often performed tests to diagnose systemic lupus erythematosus is the antinuclear antibody test. It serves as the first step in the evaluation process for autoimmune diseases that might impact various body tissues and organs.

When a person's immune system fails to discriminate between their own cells and foreign cells, autoantibodies called ANA are created. They attack chemicals found in a cell's nucleus, causing organ and tissue damage.

ANA testing may be utilized in conjunction with or after other autoantibody tests, depending on a person's indications and symptoms and the suspected condition. Antibodies that target specific compounds within cell nuclei, such as anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, anti-nucleolar, anti-histone, and anti-RNA antibodies, are detected by some of these tests, which are considered subsets of the general ANA test. In addition, an ENA panel can be utilized as a follow-up to an ANA.

These further tests are performed in addition to a person's clinical history to assist diagnose or rule out other autoimmune conditions such Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis, and scleroderma.

To detect ANA, various laboratories may employ different test procedures. Immunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody are two typical approaches. The IFA is regarded as the gold standard. Some labs will test for ANA using immunoassay and then employ IFA to confirm positive or equivocal results.

An indirect fluorescent antibody is created by mixing a person's blood sample with cells attached to a slide. Autoantibodies in the blood bind to the cells and cause them to react. A fluorescent antibody reagent is used to treat the slide, which is then inspected under a microscope. The existence of fluorescence is observed, as well as the pattern of fluorescence.

Immunoassays—these procedures are frequently carried out using automated equipment, however they are less sensitive than IFA in identifying ANA.

Other laboratory tests linked to inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or C-reactive protein, can be used to assess a person's risk of SLE or another autoimmune disease.

What do my ANA test results mean?

A positive ANA test indicates the presence of autoantibodies. This shows the presence of an autoimmune disease in someone who has signs and symptoms, but more testing is needed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Because ANA test results can be positive in persons who have no known autoimmune disease, they must be carefully assessed in conjunction with a person's indications and symptoms.

Because an ANA test can become positive before signs and symptoms of an autoimmune disease appear, determining the meaning of a positive ANA in a person who has no symptoms can take some time.

SLE is unlikely to be diagnosed with a negative ANA result. It is normally not required to repeat a negative ANA test right away; however, because autoimmune illnesses are episodic, it may be desirable to repeat the ANA test at a later date if symptoms persist.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


C3a desArg is a cleavage product of C3 complement component activation. Elevated levels of C3a have been reported in patients with acute lyme disease, acute pancreatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and adult respiratory distress syndrome.


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Serum calcium is involved in the regulation of neuromuscular and enzyme activity, bone metabolism and blood coagulation. Calcium blood levels are controlled by a complex interaction of parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, calcitonin and adrenal cortical steroids. Calcium measurements are useful in the diagnosis of parathyroid disease, some bone disorders and chronic renal disease. A low level of calcium may result in tetany.


Description: The EBV antibody test is used to measure the antibodies present in the immune system. EBV tests are used to help diagnose mononucleosis (mono) by ruling out EBV and to differentiate between EBV infection and other infections that present with the same symptoms.

Also Known As: EBV Antibody Test, EBV Ab Test, EBV Test, EBV Panel, Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) Panel, Epstein Barr Virus EBV Antibody Panel

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Panel test ordered?

When someone has symptoms that imply mono but a negative mono test, or when a pregnant woman has flu-like symptoms and her healthcare provider wants to know if the symptoms are caused by EBV or another microorganism, EBV antibody testing may be recommended.

When a healthcare provider wishes to know if they've been exposed to EBV before, testing might be ordered. When a healthcare provider wants to follow antibody concentrations or when the first test was negative but the healthcare practitioner still feels the person's symptoms are due to EBV, testing may be repeated.

What does an Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Panel blood test check for?

The Epstein-Barr virus is a virus that causes a mild to moderate sickness in most people. Epstein-Barr virus blood tests detect EBV antibodies in the blood and aid in the diagnosis of EBV infection.

The Epstein-Barr virus produces a highly common infection. Most persons in the United States are infected with EBV at some point in their life, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus is very contagious and can readily spread from one person to another. It is found in infected people's saliva and can be spread by intimate contact, such as kissing or sharing utensils or cups.

The incubation period is a period of several weeks following initial EBV exposure before related symptoms manifest. The virus multiplies in number during the acute primary infection. There is a drop in viral levels and a remission of symptoms after this, but the virus never totally disappears. EBV that stays latent in a person's body for the rest of their lives may reawaken, although it normally causes little problems unless the person's immune system is severely damaged.

The majority of people are infected with EBV as children and have few or no symptoms. When an infection arises in adolescence, however, it can lead to infectious mononucleosis, sometimes known as mono, which is characterized by fatigue, fever, sore throat, swollen lymph nodes, an enlarged spleen, and occasionally an enlarged liver. About 25% of infected teens and young adults experience these symptoms, which normally go away within a month or two.

Mono is usually diagnosed based on symptoms and the results of a full blood count and a mono test. About 25% of people with mono don't create heterophile antibodies, resulting in a negative mono test; this is especially true in youngsters. Antibodies to the EBV virus can be tested to see if the symptoms these people are having are due to a current infection with the virus.

The most prevalent cause of mono is EBV. Other causes of mono, according to the CDC, include CMV, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, rubella, and toxoplasmosis. It can be difficult to tell the difference between EBV and these other infections at times. For example, diagnosing the etiology of symptoms of a viral disease in a pregnant woman may be critical. Testing can assist distinguish between a primary EBV infection, which has not been demonstrated to harm a developing baby, and a CMV, herpes simplex virus, or toxoplasmosis infection, which can cause pregnancy difficulties and harm the fetus.

It's also crucial to rule out EBV infection and check for other possible explanations of symptoms. Those suffering from strep throat, a bacterial infection caused by group A streptococcus, must be recognized and treated with antibiotics. It's possible to have strep throat instead of mono, or to have both at the same time.

There are several assays for different types and classes of EBV antibodies. Antibodies are proteins produced by the body as part of an immune response to antigens from the Epstein-Barr virus. The amount of each of these EBV antibodies rises and declines as the illness proceeds during a primary EBV infection. Antibodies in the blood can help with diagnosis and can tell a doctor about the stage of illness and whether it's a current, recent, or past infection.

Antibody Viral Capsid Antigen-IgM antibody is commonly identified in the blood at this time. After being exposed to the virus, it appears for roughly 4 to 6 weeks before disappearing.

Antibody to VCA-IgG It appears during acute infection, with the maximum level at 2 to 4 weeks, then gradually decreases, stabilizes, and is present for the rest of one's life.

Antibody to the early antigen appears during the acute infection phase and subsequently fades; about 20% of people infected will have detectable amounts for several years after the EBV infection has cleared.

Lab tests often ordered with an Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Panel test:

  • Mononucleosis
  • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  • White Blood Cell Count (WBC)
  • Blood Smear
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Toxoplasmosis

Conditions where an Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Panel test is recommended:

  • Mononucleosis
  • Influenza
  • Pregnancy
  • Epstein-Barr Virus

How does my health care provider use an Epstein-Barr Virus Antibody Panel test?

If a person is symptomatic but has a negative mono test, blood tests for Epstein-Barr virus antibodies can help diagnose EBV infection, the most prevalent cause of infectious mononucleosis.

One or more EBV antibody tests, along with testing for cytomegalovirus, toxoplasmosis, and other infections, may be ordered in pregnant women with signs of a viral disease to assist distinguish between EBV and disorders that generate similar symptoms.

These tests may be conducted for asymptomatic people to see if they've been exposed to EBV before or are vulnerable to a primary EBV infection. This is not regularly done, but it may be requested if someone has been in intimate contact with a person who has mono, such as a teenager or an immunocompromised person.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends ordering a variety of tests to assess whether a person is vulnerable to EBV, as well as to detect a recent or earlier infection, or a reactivated EBV infection.

What do my Epstein Barr Virus antibody test results mean?

When interpreting the findings of EBV antibody testing, caution is advised. The person being tested's indications and symptoms, as well as his or her medical history, must be considered. A healthcare provider may seek the advice of an infectious disease specialist, particularly one who is familiar with EBV testing.

If someone tests positive for VCA-IgM antibodies, they are most likely infected with EBV and may be in the early stages of the illness. Even though the mono test was negative, the individual is most likely to be diagnosed with mono if they also have symptoms linked with it.

If a person's VCA-IgG and EA-D IgG tests come back positive, it's quite likely that they have an active or recent EBV infection.

If VCA-IgM is negative but VCA-IgG and an EBNA antibody are positive, the person tested most likely had an EBV infection before.

If a person is asymptomatic and negative for VCA-IgG, he or she has most likely never been exposed to EBV and is hence susceptible to infection.

In general, growing VCA-IgG levels suggest a current EBV infection, whereas dropping values indicate a recently resolved EBV infection. However, EBV antibody concentrations must be interpreted with caution because the amount of antibody present is unrelated to the severity of the infection or the length of time it will remain. High amounts of VCA-IgG may be present, and they may stay that way for the rest of one's life.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Reference Range(s)

Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgM)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <36.00 Negative
  • 36.00-43.99Equivocal
  • >43.99Positive

Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive

Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive

Epstein-Barr Virus DNA, Real-Time PCR is useful in assessing active disease. Central nervous system infections can be diagnosed with CSF specimens.

Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgG is typically detectable at clinical presentation, and persists for life. Absence of VCA-IgG usually indicates the patient is susceptible to EBV infection.

Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgM is typically detectable at clinical presentation, then declines to undetectable levels within a month in young children and within 3 months in other individuals.

Most Popular

Description: A Glucose test is a blood test used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor conditions that affect glucose levels such as prediabetes, diabetes, hyperglycemia, and hypoglycemia.

Also Known As: Fasting Blood Glucose Test, FBG Test, Fasting Blood Sugar Test, FBS Test, Fasting Glucose Test, FG Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting required

When is a Glucose test ordered?

Diabetes screening is recommended by several health groups, including the American Diabetes Association and the United States Preventive Services Task Force, when a person is 45 years old or has risk factors.

The ADA recommends retesting within three years if the screening test result is within normal limits, but the USPSTF recommends testing once a year. Annual testing may be used to monitor people with prediabetes.

When someone exhibits signs and symptoms of high blood glucose, a blood glucose test may be conducted.

Diabetics are frequently asked to self-check their glucose levels multiple times a day in order to monitor glucose levels and choose treatment alternatives as suggested by their doctor. Blood glucose levels may be ordered on a regular basis, along with other tests such as A1c, to track glucose control over time.

Unless they show early symptoms or have had gestational diabetes in a prior pregnancy, pregnant women are routinely screened for gestational diabetes between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy. If a woman is at risk of type 2 diabetes, she may be tested early in her pregnancy, according to the American Diabetes Association. When a woman has type 1, type 2, or gestational diabetes, her health care provider will normally order glucose levels to monitor her condition throughout the duration of her pregnancy and after delivery.

What does a Glucose blood test check for?

A fasting glucose test measures glucose. Glucose is the major energy source for the body's cells and the brain and nervous system's only source of energy. A consistent supply must be provided, and a somewhat constant level of glucose in the blood must be maintained. The glucose level in the blood can be measured using a variety of methods. 

Fruits, vegetables, breads, and other carbohydrate-rich foods are broken down into glucose during digestion, which is absorbed by the small intestine and circulated throughout the body. Insulin, a hormone generated by the pancreas, is required for the use of glucose for energy production. Insulin promotes glucose transport into cells and instructs the liver to store surplus energy as glycogen for short-term storage or triglycerides in adipose cells.

Normally, blood glucose rises slightly after you eat or drink, and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood, the amount of which is proportional to the size and substance of the meal. The level of glucose in the blood declines as glucose enters the cells and is digested, and the pancreas responds by delaying, then ceasing the secretion of insulin.

When blood glucose levels fall too low, such as between meals or after a strong activity, glucagon is released, which causes the liver to convert some glycogen back into glucose, so boosting blood glucose levels. The level of glucose in the blood remains pretty steady if the glucose/insulin feedback loop is working appropriately. When the balance is upset and the blood glucose level rises, the body strives to restore it by boosting insulin production and removing excess glucose through the urine.

Several diseases can cause the equilibrium between glucose and pancreatic hormones to be disrupted, resulting in high or low blood glucose. Diabetes is the most common cause. Diabetes is a collection of illnesses characterized by inadequate insulin production and/or insulin resistance. Untreated diabetes impairs a person's ability to digest and utilize glucose normally. Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed when the body is unable to produce any or enough insulin. People with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant and may or may not be able to produce enough of the hormone.

Organ failure, brain damage, coma, and, in extreme situations, death can result from severe, sudden fluctuations in blood glucose, either high or low. Chronically high blood glucose levels can harm body organs like the kidneys, eyes, heart, blood vessels, and nerves over time. Hypoglycemia can harm the brain and nerves over time.

Gestational diabetes, or hyperglycemia that exclusively arises during pregnancy, can affect some women. If left untreated, this can result in large babies with low glucose levels being born to these mothers. Women with gestational diabetes may or may not acquire diabetes later in life.

Lab tests often ordered with a Glucose test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Iron Total and Total Iron binding capacity
  • Hemoglobin A1c
  • Lipid Panel
  • Urinalysis Complete
  • TSH
  • CMP
  • Insulin
  • Microalbumin
  • Fructosamine
  • C-Peptide

Conditions where a Glucose test is recommended:

  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease
  • Insulin Resistance
  • Pancreatic Diseases
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Hypoglycemia

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a Glucose test?

The blood glucose test can be used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Detect hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia
  • Screen for diabetes in those who are at risk before symptoms appear; there may be no early indications or symptoms of diabetes in some circumstances. As a result, screening can aid in detecting it and allowing treatment to begin before the illness worsens or complications emerge.
  • Aid in the detection of diabetes, prediabetes, and gestational diabetes.
  • Monitor your blood sugar levels and manage your diabetes

Glucose levels should be monitored in those who have been diagnosed with diabetes.

Between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy, glucose blood tests are performed to assess pregnant women for gestational diabetes. Pregnant women who have never been diagnosed with diabetes should be screened and diagnosed using either a one-step or two-step strategy, according to the American Diabetes Association and the US Preventive Services Task Force.

Other tests, including diabetic autoantibodies, insulin, and C-peptide, may be used in conjunction with glucose to assist in detecting the reason of elevated glucose levels, differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and assess insulin production.

What does my glucose test result mean?

High blood glucose levels are most commonly associated with diabetes, but they can also be caused by a variety of other diseases and ailments.

Hypoglycemia is defined by a drop in blood glucose to a level that triggers nervous system symptoms before affecting the brain. The Whipple triad is a set of three criteria for diagnosing hypoglycemia.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

The MMR (IgG) Panel is the perfect way to ensure that you are protected against measles, mumps, and rubella. This panel provides you with everything you need to know about your immunity to these diseases and will help you make sure that you are up-to-date on your vaccinations. The Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), and Rubella Immune Status are all included in this thorough panel, so you can rest assured that you are getting a complete picture of your health.

Order the MMR (IgG) Panel today, and be prepared for anything life throws your way.

What is MMR IgG titer?

The MMR (IgG) Panel is a blood test that measures the levels of antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella in your body. Antibodies are proteins that your immune system produces in reaction to infections. By measuring the levels of these antibodies in the blood, it is possible to assess whether or not an individual is immune to these diseases.

What does the MMR (IgG) Panel include?

This panel includes the Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status, and Rubella Virus Genotype. The Measles Antibody (IgG) portion of the panel will tell you if you have immunity to measles. The Mumps Antibody (IgG) portion of the panel will tell you if you have immunity to mumps. The Rubella Immune Status portion of the panel will tell you if you are immune to rubella. The Rubella Virus Genotype is used to determine which type of rubella virus you have been infected with.

Why do I need the MMR (IgG) Panel?

The MMR (IgG) Panel is recommended for people who want to ensure that they are up-to-date on their vaccinations. This panel is also recommended for international travelers and for students at post-high school educational institutions.

What is MMR titer positive?

A positive MMR titer means that you have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. A positive MMR titer is generally considered to be protective for life.

What is MMR titer negative?

A negative MMR titer means that you do not have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. If you have a negative MMR titer, you should receive the MMR vaccine.

I have a positive MMR titer. Do I still need vaccinations?

Yes, you should still receive vaccinations even if you have a positive MMR titer. This is because the levels of antibodies in your body can decline over time, and you may no longer be protected against these diseases. Vaccinations will help to boost your immunity and help to keep you safe.

I have a negative MMR titer; what does that mean?

A negative MMR titer means that you do not have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. You should receive the MMR vaccine if you have a negative titer. The MMR vaccine is an efficient and safe method of protection against many diseases.

What are the risks of the MMR (IgG) Panel?

There are no risks associated with this panel. This panel is a blood test that is performed using a small sample of blood.There is no discomfort or pain involved with this test.

How do I prepare for the MMR (IgG) Panel?

There is no preparation necessary for this panel. You can eat and drink normally before and after the test.

When will I get my results?

Your results will be available within 1-2 business days.

If you have any further questions about the MMR (IgG) Panel, please contact us at any time. We are here to help you and to ensure that you are getting the most accurate and up-to-date information possible.

How often do you need MMR titers?

It is generally recommended that you get an MMR titer test every five years or so to make sure that your immunity levels are still high. You may also need to get an MMR titer test more frequently if you are exposed to measles, mumps, or rubella. If you are unsure about how often you should get an MMR titer test, please speak to your doctor or healthcare provider.

 


Mumps is an acute, usually self-limited systemic illness characterized by parotidites, high fever and fatigue. One third of infections are asymptomatic. A live attenuated vaccine is available. The mumps EIA IgG antibody test is sufficiently sensitive to establish immune status of the patient.

Pancreatic Elastase-1

Collection Instructions - Collect undiluted feces in clean, dry, sterile leak-proof container.

Clinical Significance

The Elastase-1 is a quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay for measuring concentrations of elastase-1 in feces as an aid in diagnosis of the exocrine pancreatic function.

 

Serum triglyceride analysis has proven useful in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus, nephrosis, liver obstruction, other diseases involving lipid metabolism, and various endocrine disorders. In conjunction with high density lipoprotein and total serum cholesterol, a triglyceride determination provides valuable information for the assessment of coronary heart disease risk.


Pancreatitis involves the inflammation of the pancreas. Chronic pancreatitis is a long-term condition, while acute pancreatitis occurs for a short duration.

The pancreas is located below the liver and behind the stomach. It has a narrow, flat shape, and is around 6 inches long. The gland is split into three sections: the head, the tail, and the middle. The head section is connected to the start of the duodenum (small intestine).

The pancreas produces bicarbonate and digestive enzymes that are transported into the large pancreatic duct by small tubes. The large duct moves the bicarbonate and digestive enzymes from the tail section of the pancreas to the head section and subsequently into the small intestine.

Another duct running through the pancreas’s head section is the bile duct, which carries bile from the gallbladder and liver into the duodenum. The pancreatic duct and the bile duct converge before entering the small intestine through the same duodenum opening.

The pancreas is comprised of two distinct types of tissues that each perform special functions:

Exocrine Tissues

The exocrine pancreas manufactures, stores, and outputs strong digestive enzymes that break down carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in the duodenum. The enzymes are transported to the small intestine in an inactive state, ready to be activated as required. In addition to potent digestive enzymes, exocrine tissues also produce bicarbonate. Bicarbonate is used to neutralize stomach acid to allows for digestive enzyme activation.

Endocrine Tissues

The endocrine pancreas makes and releases hormones, including glucagon and insulin. Glucagon and insulin are used to regulate glucose levels in the blood and maintain efficient transportation of sugar into the cells that require it for energy.

Pancreatitis occurs when digestive enzymes become activated inside the pancreas. The activation of such enzymes causes irritation and damage to pancreatic tissues, leading to swelling and inflammation.

In the case of acute pancreatitis, the onset of inflammation is rapid but only lasts a couple to days.

The causes of pancreatitis are long-term alcohol abuse and gallstones that clog the pancreatic duct. Severe attacks can necessitate a lengthy stay in a hospital so that serious complications can be treated, and the condition can be monitored. With modern treatment methods, mild cases can often be cured in a few days. Furthermore, during mild attacks, the pancreas is likely to return to normal functioning after healing.

Recurrent acute pancreatitis attacks can lead to chronic pancreatitis, which is long-lasting pancreas inflammation and swelling. The leading cause of chronic pancreatitis is long-term alcohol abuse. Those who smoke cigarettes are also at an increased risk of developing the condition.

Chronic pancreatitis can result in the development of scar tissue inside the pancreas, which can impair its functionality. A malfunctioning pancreas can cause diabetes and digestive problems.

Pancreatitis is more common in males than in females. Cases of the condition are also becoming more numerous in the USA, however, the reasons for the increasing number of cases are unclear. Around 2750,000 individuals are hospitalized for acute pancreatitis every year. Cases of chronic pancreatitis are less common, with hospitalization numbers of around 86,000 individuals each year.

Causes of Pancreatitis

As previously mentioned, the main causes of the condition are long-term alcohol abuse and gallstones. Additional causes can include:

  • Viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus and mumps
  • Pancreatic cancer
  • Injury to the gland organ
  • Use of pharmaceutical medications like estrogen pills and valproic acid
  • High blood calcium levels or triglyceride levels
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Carrier of the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis
  • Certain autoimmune conditions
  • Inherited pancreas defects

In some cases, the exact cause of acute or chronic pancreatitis remains unclear.

Pancreatitis can be prevalent in families, and several genes have been identified as being associated with an increased risk of developing the condition.

Signs & Symptoms

1. Acute 

Here are some of the most common acute pancreatitis signs and symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Severe upper abdominal pain. The pain often worsens when lying flat or after eating and can radiate to the spine.
  • Racing pulse
  • Abdominal tenderness and swelling

An attack of acute pancreatitis causes local inflammation, hemorrhage, and swelling of the pancreas, which typically disappears after treatment, leaving no permanent damage. However, sometimes such an attack can be very severe and lead to complications, such as:

  • Kidney failure
  • Infection
  • Necrosis (tissue death)
  • Trouble breathing
  • Pancreatic pseudocysts (sacs full of dead tissue and fluid, which often become infected)
  • Low blood pressure

If you notice any of the signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis, it’s vital that you contact a healthcare professional as the severity of symptoms does not always correspond to the amount of damage occurring. Some of the signs and symptoms of the condition can also be signs of a different medical condition that requires different treatment methods.

Swift diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis are essential for preventing complications, limiting infection, and reducing inflammation. Repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis can result in chronic pancreatitis.

2. Chronic 

Individuals suffering from chronic pancreatitis might experience recurring attacks that have symptoms similar to a bout of acute pancreatitis. As the condition progresses, the frequency of the attacks often increases. Pain resulting from chronic pancreatitis can be very severe and intermittent or continuous. The pain often worsens after consuming food or drinking, in particular alcoholic beverages.

Over time, chronic pancreatitis can lead to the gland organ becoming scarred and unable to manufacture digestive enzymes properly. This can result in:

  • Malnutrition
  • Weight loss
  • Pancreatic insufficiency
  • Pancreatic pseudocysts (sacs full of dead tissue and fluid, which often become infected)
  • Ascites (fluid buildup in the abdomen)
  • Fatty, foul-smelling stools
  • Once the cells in the pancreas that make insulin are severely damaged, diabetes can develop

Diagnosis

The diagnosis of pancreatitis requires a physical exam, medical history check, imaging tests, and blood tests. Two out of the following three criteria must be met for an acute pancreatitis diagnosis:

1. “Characteristic” imaging results

2. Pain in the abdominal area that is characteristic of the condition

3. Lipase levels or amylase levels three times greater than the normal upper limit

Lab Tests

Blood tests are carried out to measure amylase and lipase levels in the blood. Amylase and lipase are digestive enzymes produced by the pancreas.

1. Lipase level test (preferred choice)

Lipase is an enzyme that digests fats. The test of lipase levels is more accurate than the test for amylase levels for diagnosing diseases of the pancreas, especially acute pancreatitis and acute alcoholic pancreatitis. Levels of the enzyme begin to rise between 4 and 8 hours following the onset of various pancreatitis symptoms. They will typically fall back to normal levels within seven days. If the lipase level is three times higher than the normal upper limit, acute pancreatitis is diagnosed. As chronic pancreatitis worsens, levels of lipase can be normal or below normal.

2. Amylase level test

Amylase is an enzyme that digests carbohydrates. Although the amylase test can signal pancreatic diseases, it is not as specific as the lipase test. This means elevated amylase levels can indicate an issue, but the cause might not be linked to the pancreas. Amylase levels begin to increase between 2 and 12 hours following the onset of various acute pancreatitis symptoms and generally return to normal levels within seven days. If levels are three times higher than the normal upper limit, acute pancreatitis is probable. Amylase levels can also be monitored in individuals with chronic pancreatitis. The levels will typically be somewhat elevated until cell damage to cells that manufacture the enzyme becomes extensive, at which stage amylase levels in the blood are likely to be decreased.

There are further blood tests than can be used to aid in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis or help to detect complications. Such tests can include:

In addition to blood tests, other lab tests can be used to help diagnose and monitor chronic pancreatitis, including:

  • Fecal fat test to detect an excess of fat in a stool sample, which is often one of the first signs of pancreatic insufficiency. The stool elastase test (see below) is easier to carry out, so the fecal fat test is less commonly done.
  • Stool elastase test to measure the levels of elastase (a pancreatic enzyme) in a stool sample. Pancreatic insufficiency results in reduced levels of the enzyme in stools. Chronic pancreatitis can cause pancreatic insufficiency.
  • Immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) blood test to measure trypsinogen levels. Trypsinogen, made by the pancreas, is the inactive precursor of trypsin, an enzyme that digests protein. Elevated IRT levels can be a sign.
  • Chymotrypsin test to measure chymotrypsin in stools. Chymotrypsin is a pancreatic enzyme that digests proteins, and an absence of it in stools signifies pancreatic insufficiency.
  • Genetic mutation tests, such as cystic fibrosis gene mutation testing and test for other genes known to cause hereditary pancreatitis.
  • Chloride test (aka sweat test) to diagnose cystic fibrosis.