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This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


Androstenedione is useful when evaluating patients with androgen excess and managing patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH).

AMH-MIS may be used in the investigation of ovarian reserve since AMH concentrations in adult women reflect the number of small antral and preantral follicles entering the growth phase of their life cycle. These follicles are proportional to the number of primordial follicles that still remain in the ovary, or the ovarian reserve.
AMH decreases throughout a woman's reproductive life, which reflects the continuous decline of the oocyte/follicle pool with age and, accordingly, ovarian aging.


Description: Apo A1 and B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein A1 and Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum along with the ratio between B/A1. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk. Low levels of APO A1 are associated with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) and are said to predict CAD better then triglycerides and HDL does.

Also Known As: Apo A1 and B Test, Apo A1 Test, Apo B Test, APOAB Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test, Apolipoprotein Evaluation Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting for 12 hours is required.

When are Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo A-I is a protein that plays a key function in lipid metabolism and is the most abundant protein in HDL, or "good cholesterol." Excess cholesterol in cells is removed by HDL, which transports it to the liver for recycling or elimination. Apo A-I levels tend to rise and fall with HDL levels, and apo A-I deficits are linked to an increased risk of CVD.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does Apolipoprotein A1 and B blood tests check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab or taxi. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Sticking with the taxi analogy, the driver is Apolipoprotein A. It permits HDL to be detected and bound by receptors in the liver at the end of the transport by activating the enzymes that load cholesterol from the tissues into HDL. Apolipoprotein A is divided into two types: apo A-I and apo A-II. Apo A-I has a higher prevalence than apo A-II. Apo A-I concentrations can be evaluated directly, and they tend to rise and fall in tandem with HDL levels. Deficiencies in apo A-I are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests:

  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests are recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use Apolipoprotein A1 and B tests?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

An apo A-I test may be ordered in the following situations:

Assist in the diagnosis of apo A-I deficiency caused by genetic or acquired diseases.

Assist those with a personal or family history of heart disease, high cholesterol, or triglycerides in their blood.

Keep track of how well lifestyle changes and lipid therapies are working.

An apo A-I test can be ordered in conjunction with an apo B test to determine the apo B/apo A-I ratio. This ratio is occasionally used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio to assess the risk of developing CVD.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein A1 and B test results mean?

Low apo A-I levels are linked to low HDL levels and slowed elimination of excess cholesterol from the body. Low levels of apo A-I, as well as high levels of apo B, are linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.

Deficiencies in apo A-I are caused by a number of hereditary diseases. Abnormal lipid levels, notably excessive amounts of low-density lipoprotein, are common in people with certain illnesses. They frequently have a higher rate of atherosclerosis. Low apo A-I levels are caused by several genetic diseases.

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: The CRP test is used to identify and/or monitor inflammation in patients.

Also Known As: CRP Test, Inflammation test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a C-Reactive Protein test ordered?

When a person's medical history and signs and symptoms indicate that they may have a significant bacterial infection, a CRP test may be recommended. When a newborn displays signs of infection or when a person has sepsis symptoms including fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate, it may be ordered.

It's also commonly requested on a regular basis to check illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and it's routinely repeated to see if medication is working. This is especially effective for inflammation issues because CRP levels decrease as inflammation decreases.

What does a C-Reactive Protein blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. After trauma or a heart attack, with active or uncontrolled autoimmune illnesses, and with acute bacterial infections like sepsis, markedly higher levels are reported. CRP levels can rise by a thousand-fold in response to inflammatory diseases, and their elevation in the blood can occur before pain, fever, or other clinical signs. The test detects inflammation caused by acute situations or monitors disease activity in chronic diseases by measuring the level of CRP in the blood.

The CRP test is not a diagnostic tool, although it can tell a doctor if inflammation is occurring. This information can be combined with other indicators like signs and symptoms, a physical exam, and other tests to establish whether someone has an acute inflammatory disorder or is having a flare-up of a chronic inflammatory disease. The health care provider may next do additional tests and treatment.

This CRP test should not be confused with the hs-CRP test. These are two separate CRP tests, each of which measures a different range of CRP levels in the blood for different purposes.

Lab tests often ordered with a C-Reactive Protein test:

  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • Procalcitonin
  • ANA
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • Complement

Conditions where a C-Reactive Protein test is recommended:

  • Arthritis
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Sepsis
  • Vasculitis
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Meningitis and Encephalitis

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a C-Reactive Protein test?

A health practitioner uses the C-reactive protein test to diagnose inflammation. CRP is an acute phase reactant, a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. The CRP test is not a diagnostic test for any ailment, but it can be used in conjunction with other tests to determine whether a person has an acute or chronic inflammatory disorder.

CRP, for example, can be used to detect or track substantial inflammation in someone who is suspected of having an acute ailment like:

  • Sepsis is a dangerous bacterial infection.
  • An infection caused by a fungus
  • Inflammation of the pelvis

People with chronic inflammatory diseases can use the CRP test to detect flare-ups and/or see if their medication is working. Here are a few examples:

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Arthritis, which can take many forms.
  • Autoimmune disorders, examples include lupus and vasculitis

CRP is occasionally requested in conjunction with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, another inflammatory test. While the CRP test is not specific enough to diagnose an illness, it does serve as a broad marker for infection and inflammation, alerting doctors to the need for more testing and treatment. A variety of additional tests may be used to determine the source of inflammation, depending on the probable cause.

What do my C-Reactive Protein test results mean?

CRP levels in the blood are usually low.

CRP levels in the blood that are high or rising indicate the existence of inflammation, but they don't tell you where it is or what's causing it. A high CRP level can establish the presence of a severe bacterial infection in people who are suspected of having one. High levels of CRP in persons with chronic inflammatory disorders indicate a flare-up or that treatment isn't working.

When the CRP level rises and then falls, it indicates that the inflammation or infection is diminishing and/or responding to treatment.

Is there anything else I should know about C-Reactive Protein?

CRP levels can rise during pregnancy, as well as with the use of birth control tablets or hormone replacement therapy. Obese people have also been found to have higher CRP levels.

In the presence of inflammation, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test will also rise; however, CRP rises first and then falls faster than the ESR.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A hs-CRP or High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein test is a blood test used to accurately detect lower concentrations of the protein C-Reactive Protein. This test is used to evaluate your risk of cardiovascular and heart disease and to check for inflammation and many other issues.

Also Known As: hsCRP Test, Cardiac CRP Test, high sensitivity C-reactive protein Test, CRP Test for heart disease.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a hs-CRP test ordered?

There is currently no consensus on when to get an hs-CRP test. It may be beneficial for treatment purposes to order hs-CRP for those that have kidney disease, diabetes or inflammatory disorders.

It's possible that hs-CRP will be tested again to confirm that a person has persistently low levels of inflammation.

What does a hs-CRP blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein found in the blood that rises in response to infection and inflammation, as well as after trauma, surgery, or a heart attack. As a result, it's one of numerous proteins referred to as acute phase reactants. The high-sensitivity CRP test detects low levels of inflammation in the blood, which are linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

According to the American Heart Association, CVD kills more people in the United States each year than any other cause. A number of risk factors have been related to the development of CVD, including family history, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, being overweight or diabetic, however a considerable number of people with few or no recognized risk factors will also acquire CVD. This has prompted researchers to investigate for new risk variables that could be causing CVD or could be used to identify lifestyle modifications and/or treatments that could lower a person's risk.

High-sensitivity CRP is one of an increasing number of cardiac risk markers that may be used to assess an individual's risk. According to certain research, monitoring CRP with a highly sensitive assay can assist identify the risk level for CVD in persons who appear to be healthy. CRP levels at the higher end of the reference range can be measured with this more sensitive test. Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, these normal but slightly elevated levels of CRP in otherwise healthy persons might indicate the future risk of a heart attack, sudden cardiac death, stroke, and peripheral artery disease.

Lab tests often ordered with a hs-CRP test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Lipid Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lp-Pla2
  • Glucose

Conditions where a hs-CRP test is recommended:

  • Heart Attack
  • Heart Disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Stroke

How does my health care provider use a hs-CRP test?

A test for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein can be used to assess a person's risk of cardiovascular disease. It can be used in conjunction with a lipid profile or other cardiac risk markers, such as the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 test, to provide further information regarding the risk of heart disease.

CRP is a protein that rises in the bloodstream as a result of inflammation. A continuous low level of inflammation, according to studies, plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, the narrowing of blood vessels caused by the build-up of cholesterol and other lipids, which is typically linked to CVD. The hs-CRP test successfully detects low levels of C-reactive protein, indicating low but chronic inflammation, and so aids in predicting a person's risk of developing CVD.

Some specialists believe that high-sensitivity CRP is a good test for assessing CVD, heart attacks, and stroke risk, and that it can help in the evaluation process before a person gets one of these health problems. Some experts believe that combining a good marker for inflammation, such as hs-CRP, with a lipid profile is the best way to predict risk. This test has been recommended by several organizations for persons who are at a moderate risk of having a heart attack in the following ten years.

What does my hs-CRP test result mean?

Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, high levels of hs-CRP in otherwise healthy people have been found to predict an elevated risk of future heart attacks, strokes, sudden cardiac death, and/or peripheral arterial disease.

Higher hs-CRP concentrations indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, while lower values indicate a lower risk. Individuals with hs-CRP values at the high end of the normal range are 1.5 to 4 times more likely than those with low levels of hs-CRP to have a heart attack.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: Cancer antigen 125 is present one most of the ovarian cancer cells. This test is used to measure the amount of CA 125 in the blood. It can be used to monitor treatment, assess patients who have successfully treated cancer, or check if there may be ovarian cancer present.

Also Known As: CA 125 Tumor Marker, Cancer Antigen 125 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a CA 125 test ordered?

The CA-125 test may be administered before a woman begins treatment for ovarian cancer to serve as a baseline against which future values can be compared. A healthcare practitioner may order CA-125 testing at intervals during therapy to check response to treatment. After therapy is finished, CA-125 can be evaluated on a regular basis.

When a woman develops a pelvic mass, a healthcare practitioner may conduct a CA-125 test to assist figure out what's causing it.

When a woman is at high risk of developing ovarian cancer, certain healthcare practitioners may prescribe a CA-125 test and an ultrasound at regular intervals.

What does a CA 125 blood test check for?

Cancer Antigen 125 is a protein found on the surface of most ovarian cancer cells, but not all. In certain instances, this makes the test useful as a tumor marker. The CA-125 test determines how much CA-125 is present in the blood.

CA-125 concentrations in the blood of an ovarian cancer patient may be significantly increased. As a result, the test could be used to track the success of treatment and/or check for cancer recurrence. However, because not all women with ovarian cancer have increased CA-125, the test may not be appropriate in all circumstances.

Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of death among women. According to the American Cancer Society, a woman's lifetime risk of acquiring ovarian cancer is roughly 1 in 75, with a 1 in 100 chance of dying from it. According to the American Cancer Society, around 22,000 new cases are identified each year in the United States, with approximately 14,000 women dying as a result.

Only around 20% of ovarian tumors are discovered in the early stages, before they have progressed beyond the ovary. The signs of ovarian cancer are extremely non-specific, which is one of the main reasons they go unnoticed.

Ongoing research is being driven by the need for a dependable tool for early identification of ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women. In the meanwhile, it's critical to get frequent physicals, pelvic exams, and be aware of your family's medical history and symptoms.

Because CA-125 is non-specific, it is not suggested as a screening test for asymptomatic women. CA-125 is produced in small amounts by normal tissues throughout the body, as well as by some malignancies. A range of non-cancerous diseases, such as menstruation, pregnancy, and pelvic inflammatory disease, can cause somewhat high levels in the blood.

Lab tests often ordered with a CA 125 test:

  • CEA
  • BRCA Gene Mutation

Conditions where a CA 125 test is recommended:

  • Ovarian Cancer

How does my health care provider use a CA 125 test?

Cancer Antigen 125 is a tumor marker that is primarily used to track therapy during ovarian cancer treatment. CA-125 is also used to see if cancer has returned after therapy has ended. CA-125 tests with rising or falling concentrations are generally more informative than a single result.

CA-125 is sometimes used in conjunction with transvaginal ultrasonography to screen and monitor women who are at high risk for ovarian cancer but have not yet been diagnosed with the disease. An inherited genetic mutation in one of two genes, breast cancer gene 1 or breast cancer gene 2, is the most significant risk factor for ovarian cancer. Family history, advancing age, reproductive history and infertility, hormone replacement treatment use, and obesity are all risk factors.

To explore a mass in a woman's lower abdomen area, a CA-125 test may be ordered in conjunction with a transvaginal ultrasound.

However, because the test is non-specific, it is not used to screen women for ovarian cancer. The US Preventive Services Task Force advises against ovarian cancer screening in women. This advice is for asymptomatic women only; it does not apply to women who are at a high risk of developing ovarian cancer, such as those who have a genetic mutation.

There is currently no single reliable approach for detecting ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women. Only around 20% of ovarian tumors are discovered in their early stages, before they have progressed beyond the ovary. The signs of ovarian cancer are extremely non-specific, which is one reason they go unnoticed. In the meanwhile, it's critical to get frequent physicals, pelvic checks, and be aware of family history and other risk factors.

What do my CA 125 test results mean?

If CA-125 levels drop throughout treatment, it usually means that the malignancy is responding to it. If CA-125 levels increase or remain unchanged, the cancer may not be responding to treatment. CA-125 values that are elevated after therapy may suggest that the cancer has returned.

If a woman has been diagnosed with ovarian cancer and has a normal baseline CA-125 level, the test is unlikely to be beneficial in monitoring her illness. CA-125 is not a suitable predictor of disease development in this scenario because the ovarian cancer may not be making it.

A considerably raised CA-125 is concerning in a woman with a pelvic mass or in a woman who has a high risk of developing ovarian cancer, but it does not always imply ovarian cancer. This discovery would lead to more testing and evaluation.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: The CA 15-3 is a cancer antigen test that is measuring the levels of the cancer antigen 15-2 that is present with breast cancer. This test is commonly used to monitor and watch for recurrence of breast cancer.

Also Known As: Cancer Antigen 15-3 Test, CA-Breast Test, Cancer Antigen-Breast Test, CA153 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a CA 15-3 test ordered?

When advanced breast cancer is first detected, CA 15-3 may be administered together with other tests to assist evaluate cancer features and treatment options. If CA 15-3 is initially raised, it may be ordered on a regular basis to assess therapy effectiveness and to help detect recurrence. When breast cancer is identified early, before it has progressed, CA 15-3 is usually not ordered since levels are not raised in the majority of early tumors.

What does a CA 15-3 blood test check for?

Normal breast cells produce cancer antigen 15-3, which is a protein. The production of CA 15-3 and the related cancer antigen 27.29 is enhanced in many persons with malignant breast tumors. CA 15-3 does not induce cancer; instead, tumor cells dump it into the bloodstream. CA 15-3 is measured in the blood in this test.

CA 15-3 is a tumor marker that may be tested in the blood and used to track the progression of cancer. CA 15-3 is high in fewer than half of women with early-stage breast cancer or a small tumor, whereas it is elevated in nearly 80% of women with advanced breast cancer. The test isn't always useful because not all women with invasive breast cancer have increased CA 15-3.

Because it is non-specific, CA 15-3 is not recommended as a screening test for breast cancer in women. It can also be increased in healthy persons and people who have tumors of the colon, lungs, pancreatic, ovary, or prostate, as well as certain illnesses like cirrhosis, hepatitis, and benign breast disease.

Lab tests often ordered with a CA 15-3 test:

  • CEA
  • HER2/neu test
  • Estrogen Receptor Status
  • Progesterone Receptor Status
  • Gene Expression tests

Conditions where a CA 15-3 test is recommended:

  • Breast Cancer

How does my health care provider use a 15-3 test?

The cancer antigen 15-3 test, as well as the associated CA 27.29 test, are primarily used to track therapy response and detect breast cancer recurrence. They are used in conjunction with other clinical evaluations and tests to assess a person's breast cancer, such as estrogen and progesterone receptors, Her2/neu, and genomic testing for breast cancer.

CA 15-3 is occasionally ordered to get a sense of how much cancer is present. Because CA 15-3 can only be used as a marker if the cancer produces high levels of it, this test isn't appropriate for everyone with breast cancer.

Because non-cancerous diseases can induce increased levels, the CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 tests are not precise or specific enough to be used as cancer screening tests.

What do my CA 15-3 test results mean?

The greater the CA 15-3 level, the further advanced the breast cancer is and the more cancer is found in general. CA 15-3 levels tend to rise as the cancer progresses. When metastatic breast cancer has progressed to the bones and/or liver, the highest levels of CA 15-3 are frequently detected.

CA 15-3 levels that rise over time may suggest that a patient is not responding to treatment or that the cancer has returned.

Normal CA 15-3 levels do not rule out the possibility of metastatic or localized breast cancer. It could be too early in the disease process to identify elevated CA 15-3 levels, or the person could be one of the roughly 20% to 25% of advanced breast cancer patients whose tumors do not shed CA 15-3.

CA 15-3 levels are mild to moderate in a number of illnesses, including lung, pancreas, ovary, prostate, and colon cancer, as well as cirrhosis, hepatitis, and benign breast abnormalities, and in a small percentage of seemingly healthy people. CA 15-3 levels in non-cancerous circumstances are generally constant over time.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: CA 19-9 is a cancer antigen test that is testing for a protein that exists on the surface of certain cancer cells. The CA 19-9 test can be used to measure the level of these proteins in the blood and is useful as a tumor marker.

Also Known As: Carbohydrate Antigen (CA) 19-9 Test, Cancer Antigen 19-9 Test, Cancer Antigen (CA) 19-9, Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a CA 19-9 test ordered?

When a person has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer or has signs and symptoms that could indicate pancreatic cancer, CA 19-9 may be ordered. Early warning signs and symptoms can be vague and ambiguous.

If CA 19-9 levels are initially increased in pancreatic cancer, a series of CA 19-9 tests may be conducted to assess response during therapy and on a frequent basis after treatment to assist detect recurrence.

When a healthcare practitioner suspects bile duct cancer in a person with a bile duct obstruction, CA 19-9 may be prescribed. CA 19-9 levels can spike due to non-cancerous reasons of bile duct obstruction, but they drop once the blockage is addressed. In these circumstances, re-checking CA 19-9 levels should be done at least a week or two after the blockage has been cleared.

What does a CA 19-9 blood test check for?

The protein cancer antigen 19-9 is found on the surface of some cancer cells. CA 19-9 does not cause cancer; rather, it is emitted by tumor cells and can be discovered in blood and other bodily fluids by laboratory tests. The level of CA19-9 is measured in this test.

Because CA 19-9 can be tested in the blood, it can be used as a tumor marker to track the progression of cancer. CA 19-9 levels are high in 70% to 95% of persons with advanced pancreatic cancer.

CA 19-9 levels may also be elevated in cancers of the gallbladder and bile ducts, colorectal cancer, gastric cancers, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, liver cancer, pancreatitis, thyroid disease, and liver disease, among other cancers, conditions, and diseases. CA 19-9 is found in trace levels in the blood of healthy humans. CA 19-9 cannot be utilized for screening or diagnosis by itself because it is not specific for pancreatic cancer.

Lab tests often ordered with a CA 19-9 test:

  • Bilirubin
  • Carcinoembryonic Antigen
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • Tumor Markers

Conditions where a CA 19-9 test is recommended:

  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Pancreatitis
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Gastric Cancers
  • Lung Cancer
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Liver Cancer
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Liver Disease

How does my health care provider use a CA 19-9 test?

The CA 19-9 test, along with other tests like carcinoembryonic antigen, bilirubin, and/or a liver panel, can be used to evaluate and monitor someone who has been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and is having treatment.

CA 19-9 can only be utilized as a tumor marker if it is produced in large amounts by the malignancy. CA 19-9 may be ordered to help evaluate and monitor persons with bile duct cancer because it is high in roughly 65 percent of those with this type of cancer.

The CA 19-9 test is insufficiently sensitive and specific to be used as a cancer screening test. Because non-cancerous diseases can induce elevated CA 19-9 levels, it is not yet effective for detection or diagnosis. Researchers are still looking at markers that can be used alone or in combination with CA 19-9 to help diagnose and screen for pancreatic cancer in its early stages, when it is most curable.

What do my CA 19-9 test results mean?

Healthy persons have low levels of CA 19-9, although numerous illnesses that affect the liver or pancreas can induce transitory spikes.

People with pancreatic cancer, other malignancies, and a variety of other diseases and ailments may have moderate to high levels. CA 19-9 levels are higher in cancers of the exocrine pancreas. This cancer develops in the tissues that manufacture food-digesting enzymes, as well as in the ducts that transport those enzymes to the small intestine. This kind of pancreatic cancer accounts for approximately 95% of all pancreatic cancers.

CA 19-9 levels that rise and then diminish over time may indicate that the treatment is functioning and/or that the malignancy was successfully removed during surgery. Levels that stay high or rise over time could suggest that treatment isn't working and/or that the cancer is reoccurring.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


CA 27.29 may be useful for monitoring patients for metastatic breast cancer.


This test determines the subtypes of apoe which will aid in the risk assessment of corornary heart disease (CHD) and hyperlipoproteinemia.

Description: Ion Mobility Lipoprotein Fractionation is a test that uses a gas-phase technology to separate the lipid particles by size. As each particle is separated, they are counted.

Also Known As: LDL Particle Testing, LDL-P Test, LDL Subclass Test, sdLDL Test, LDL Fractionations Test, LDL Particle Size Test, LDL Particle Number Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting preferred, but not required

When is a Lipoprotein Fractionation test ordered?

When someone has a personal or family history of early cardiovascular disease, this testing may be ordered as part of an overall evaluation of cardiac risk, especially if the person does not have typical cardiac risk factors like high cholesterol, high LDL cholesterol, high triglyceride, low HDL cholesterol, smoking, obesity, inactivity, diabetes, and/or hypertension.

When a person with elevated LDL-P and/or a high proportion of tiny, dense LDL particles has undertaken cholesterol-lowering treatment or lifestyle adjustments, the healthcare practitioner may conduct LDL lipoprotein subfraction testing, as well as other lipid tests, to assess treatment success.

Although LDL-P is not typically suggested as a screening test, some healthcare practitioners are using it in conjunction with a battery of other cardiac risk tests to evaluate a person's overall risk of getting CVD.

What does a Lipoprotein Fractionation blood test check for?

Low-density lipoproteins are lipid-transporting particles that travel throughout the body. Protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid molecules are all present in each particle. As they move through the bloodstream, their makeup changes. Lipoprotein particles range in size from large and fluffy to small and dense, depending on which molecules are eliminated and which are added. The relative amounts of particles with different characteristics in the blood are determined by LDL particle testing. Subfractionation testing is a term used to describe this process.

Traditional lipid testing determines the amount of LDL cholesterol in the blood but does not assess the number of LDL particles. Increased numbers of small, dense LDL particles have been linked to inflammation and are more likely to produce atherosclerosis than fewer light, fluffy LDL particles, according to some research. Researchers believe that the existence of an elevated quantity of sdLDL could be one of the reasons why some people have heart attacks while having relatively low total and LDL cholesterol levels.

The number of sdLDL particles in a person's blood is determined in part by genetics, in part by sex, and in part by lifestyle and overall health. Increased levels of sdLDL are linked to certain diseases and disorders, like as diabetes and hypertension.

By examining a person's triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, it is usually able to estimate whether they have a high amount of sdLDL particles. Typically, these tests are done as part of a lipid profile. People with high triglycerides and low HDL-C have higher levels of sdLDL. More sdLDL is connected with a triglyceride level greater than 120 mg/dL and an HDL-C level less than 40 mg/dL in men and less than 50 mg/dL in women.

Other lipoprotein particles, such as HDL and VLDL, can also be subfractionated, however these tests are generally utilized in research settings and are not discussed on this page.

Lab tests often ordered with a Lipoprotein Fractionation test:

  • Lipid Panel
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Direct LDL
  • Apolipoprotein A-1
  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Triglycerides
  • Homocysteine
  • Hs-CRP
  • VAP

Conditions where a Lipoprotein Fractionation test is recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Disease

How does my health care provider use a Lipoprotein Fractionation test?

Low-density lipoprotein particle testing determines the number, size, density, and/or electrical charge of LDL particles. It may be useful in determining cardiac risk in patients with a personal or family history of heart disease at a young age, particularly if their total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels are not markedly increased. LDL subfraction testing is usually done in conjunction with or after a lipid profile.

While the LDL-C test is a good predictor of cardiovascular disease risk for many people, research has indicated that certain persons with healthy LDL-C levels nonetheless have an increased risk of CVD. Similarly, even if their LDL-C is at a safe level, people with chronic diseases like diabetes may be at higher risk. The quantity of LDL particles and/or their size has been recommended as an additional factor to consider when assessing CVD risk in these populations. Lipoprotein subfraction testing may be done in these situations to further assess a person's CVD risk.

LDL-P is sometimes requested to see how well a treatment is working at reducing the quantity of tiny, dense LDL particles.

LDL subfraction testing has been employed in clinical settings, although VLDL or HDL subfraction testing is primarily used in research. This is because LDL cholesterol has been established as the key risk factor for heart disease, and LDL assessment has received increased attention in research and development.

What do my Lipoprotein Fractionation test results mean?

The method and reporting format utilized in an LDL-P test, as well as the person's total cholesterol, LDL-C, VLDL, and/or HDL cholesterol, are all reflected in the results. Because different methods divide subclasses based on different physical qualities, results may not be immediately comparable from one method to the next or from one laboratory to the next.

Usually, the result is evaluated in context of a lipid profile and the risk it implies:

  • If a person has a high number of mostly tiny, dense LDL and an elevated LDL-P, this result will enhance the person's risk of cardiovascular disease beyond the risk associated with total LDL.
  • If a person only has large, fluffy LDL and a low LDL-P, this discovery will not put them at any greater risk.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

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Description: CEA is a test that measures the levels of carcinoembryonic antigens in the blood. It is used to evaluate a person who has been diagnosed with cancer. The levels of CEA maybe elevated with certain types of cancer.

Also Known As: Carcinoembryonic antigen Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a CEA test ordered?

When a person is diagnosed with colon cancer or another type of cancer, a CEA test may be ordered. It will be evaluated before treatment begins and subsequently on a frequent basis to assess treatment success and detect recurrence.

When cancer is suspected but not yet diagnosed, a CEA test may be conducted. Although CEA can be increased with a variety of illnesses, this is not a popular usage for the test, it may provide additional information to a healthcare practitioner.

When a healthcare practitioner suspects that a cancer has metastasized, a CEA test may be conducted on a fluid other than blood.

What does a CEA blood test check for?

Carcinoembryonic antigen is a protein found in the developing tissues of a fetus. It drops to a very low level by the time a baby is delivered. CEA is generally seen in extremely low amounts in the blood of people, but it can be raised in cancer patients. This test examines the quantity of CEA in the blood to aid in the evaluation of cancer patients.

CEA is a tumor indicator. CEA was once assumed to be a particular marker for colon cancer, however subsequent research has revealed that an elevation in CEA can be detected in a variety of malignancies. Non-cancer disorders such as inflammation, cirrhosis, peptic ulcer, ulcerative colitis, rectal polyps, emphysema, and benign breast disease, as well as smokers, can cause an increase in CEA. As a result, it is ineffective as a general cancer screening tool, although it does play a role in assessing cancer therapy response. An initial CEA baseline test may be performed after a person has been diagnosed with cancer. If this level is raised, serial CEA testing may be used to track the cancer's progress as the patient receives treatment.

Lab tests often ordered with a CEA test:

  • Tumor Markers
  • CSF Analysis
  • Body Fluid Analysis
  • CA 19-9
  • Calcitonin
  • Alpha Fetoprotein
  • Antiphospholipid Antibodies

Conditions where a CEA test is recommended:

  • Colon Cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Ovarian Cancer
  • Breast Cancer
  • Thyroid Cancer
  • Lung Cancer

How does my health care provider use a CEA test?

The carcinoembryonic antigen test can be utilized in the following situations:

  • To keep track of the treatment of persons who have been diagnosed with colon cancer. It can also be used as a marker for rectum, lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, stomach, and ovary malignancies. Prior to therapy, a CEA test is usually ordered as a "baseline" measurement. If the level is high, the test can be used to track a patient's response to treatment and see if the cancer has advanced or returned.
  • Cancer staging entails determining the size of the tumor as well as the extent to which it has spread.
  • CEA testing in a bodily fluid sample can help doctors figure out if cancer has progressed to a body cavity like the chest or abdomen.
  • In the examination of cancer, a CEA test can be performed in conjunction with other tumor markers.

CEA is not produced by all malignancies, therefore a positive CEA test does not always indicate cancer.

What do my CEA test results mean?

Monitoring treatment and recurrence: CEA levels that are first raised but later return to normal following treatment indicate that the cancer has been successfully treated. The first symptom of tumor recurrence is frequently a progressively rising CEA level.

Staging: People with smaller and early-stage tumors are more likely to have a normal or slightly raised CEA score on initial testing. A high CEA value is more probable in people with larger tumors, later-stage cancer, or cancers that have disseminated throughout the body.

Testing for metastasis: If CEA is found in a bodily fluid other than blood, the cancer has most likely migrated to that part of the body. If CEA is found in CSF fluid, for example, it could suggest that cancer has spread to the central nervous system.

Because not all malignancies produce CEA, it's possible to have cancer and a normal CEA at the same time. The test will be useless as a surveillance tool if a malignancy does not produce CEA.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.



Do you find it challenging to keep track of your health? If you're in your 20s, you might not think you have anything to worry about when it comes to your health.

A female wellness checkup has the potential to save lives. After heart disease, cancer is the second most frequent cause of death in women in the U.S. Research has suggested that taking part in a wellness checkup can detect cancer and other illnesses early and improve the chances of successful treatment. 

Are you interested in finding out more? Read on to find out everything you need to know about female wellness. 

What Is Women's Wellness?

Female or women's wellness focuses on the physical and mental wellbeing of women. Women experience specific health concerns such as menopause, cervical cancer, and stress-related illnesses that deserve their own attention.

In a recent study, 50% of women stated that "stressing about life" was the most significant wellness challenge. 

Signs and Symptoms of Poor Female Wellness

As you get older, health issues are more likely to occur. Some common signs of poor women's health are:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Constant nausea
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Persistent fever
  • Struggling to sleep
  • Exhaustion
  • Memory problems

Order a baseline women's wellness checkup if you are experiencing any of the above symptoms or generally feel in poor health.

What Causes a Decline in Women's Wellness?

There are many causes of poor health and wellbeing in women. Smoking, alcoholism, lack of health care, and other lifestyle choices can lead to more serious health problems down the line. 

High Cholesterol

Eating a diet high in cholesterol can lead to diabetes, kidney disease, and high blood pressure. Drinking lots of alcohol and avoiding exercise can also contribute to high cholesterol levels. 

High Blood Pressure

Many women have no idea they are suffering from high blood pressure because there are no symptoms. High blood pressure (also known as hypertension) often goes untreated in young adults

Lack of Exercise

Physical activity can improve your mood and reduce the risk of chronic disease. Regular exercise also helps boost your levels of "good" cholesterol. Taking part in physical activity can also reduce the risk of heart disease and obesity. 

Risk Factors for a Decline in Women's Wellness

Many symptoms of poor women's wellness can go unnoticed and untreated. This can lead to chronic health problems, preventable diseases, and even death. For example, heart disease is a preventable illness that accounts for 27% of female deaths in the US.

With regular wellness checkups, women can identify health problems early and begin treatment.

How Is Women's Wellness Measured with Lab Tests?

Lab tests use a large variety of biomarkers to identify risk factors of disease. A wide range of women's wellness tests are available for testing specific conditions.

If you are a healthy woman under 50, you should have a wellness checkup once every three years. Women ages 40 plus should have an annual wellness visit to prevent disease and health problems.

Tests That Effect Women's Hormone Health

Several key biomarkers are essential for female health. You may wish to order some of the following tests if you want to investigate your hormone balance, health, and wellbeing.

Estradiol 

Estradiol maintains and matures the reproductive system. Estradiol levels increase during menstruation and cause the maturation and release of an egg. High levels of estradiol are linked with acne, depression, and an increased risk of breast cancer. 

Estrogen 

Estrogen helps to maintain the female reproductive system. It also plays a role in bone and cholesterol metabolism. Low estrogen levels can cause headaches, fatigue, depression, and poor bone health. 


Progesterone 

Progesterone is made by the ovaries and plays an important role in pregnancy and the production of breastmilk. Progesterone testing can find the cause of infertility, miscarriage, or investigate ovulation.

Other markers you may wish to include in your women's wellness test are:

  • Estriol (one of the three main estrogens)
  • Calcium 
  • Testosterone
  • FSH (Follicle Stimulating Hormone)
  • LH (Sexual Development and Functioning)

Benefits of Women's Wellness Lab Testing

Women's wellness testing is all about preventing health problems before they occur. Lab tests keep track of important health changes such as menstrual cycle, blood pressure, and BMI.

Your tests results are available in a private and secure dashboard. Here you can see your data displayed with intuitive charts and detailed explanations.

You can share your results with your healthcare provider to arrange treatment and a personalized prevention plan. Some of the benefits of women's wellness lab testing include:

  • Secure and confidential results
  • No physician referral needed
  • Affordable pricing
  • Accurate and reliable
  • No health insurance required

You can order test kits from the comfort of your home and have the results as soon as 24 hours later. 

Types of Lab Tests for Women's Wellness

There are various tests for you to choose from to get the most out of lab testing. You can choose a baseline test that will measure your essential vitamins and minerals levels while providing an investigation into how your body is working.

For a more in-depth analysis, there are a variety of tests that investigate hormone levels, lipids, and insulin. Ulta Lab Tests has prepared a group of wellness panels for women, including key lab tests and biomarkers to monitor their health.

  1. Wellness - Women's Select with Lipoprotein Fractionation- 9 Tests 102 Biomarkers
  2. Wellness - Women's Baseline with Lipoprotein Fractionation- 13 Tests 109 Biomarkers
  3. Wellness - Women's Essential with Lipoprotein Fractionation- 18 Tests 117 Biomarkers
  4. Wellness - Women's Essential Plus with Lipoprotein Fractionation - 24 Tests 124 Biomarkers
  5. Wellness - Women's Premium with Lipoprotein Fractionation - 40 Tests 150 Biomarkers
  6. Wellness - Women's Premium Plus with Lipoprotein  Fractionation - 43 Tests 154 Biomarkers
  7. Wellness - Women's Performance with Lipoprotein Fractionation - 32 Tests 136 Biomarkers
  8. Wellness - Women's Performance Plus with Lipoprotein - 37 Tests 147 Biomarkers
  9. Wellness - Women's Comprehensive with Lipoprotein Fractionation - 45 Tests 159 Biomarkers

Frequently Asked Questions About Women's Wellness Lab Testing

Do you have some questions before you order your first wellness lab test? Here are some of the most frequently asked questions about women's wellness lab testing. 

How Do I Order a Women's Wellness Lab Test?

You can order your lab test online by choosing the test(s) you would like and select the online locator to identify the nearest patient service center near you to get your specimen collected. 

Each lab test includes instructions if special requirements such as fasting are required before collecting your specimen.

Where and When Do I View My Results?

Test results are ready as soon as 1-2 business days following the collection of your specimen. More complex testing can take 7-10 business days. Results are available online in your private and secure healthcare dashboard.

You will receive explanations of your biomarkers to provide an understanding of your results. You can share your results with your primary care physician and healthcare providers to track your progress. 

Order Your Female Wellness Checkup

There are many benefits of a regular female wellness checkup, and in some cases, it could even save lives. With a wide variety of options available for thorough and accurate testing, women's wellness lab testing is a health risk assessment all women should be taking for the good of their health and wellbeing. 

With secure and confidential results, ordering your lab tests is quick and easy. Start your female wellness journey by ordering your lab tests online from Ulta Lab Teststoday.