Magnesium Advocacy Group Recommended

Magnesium Advocacy Group Recommended Lab Tests and health information

The Magnesium Advocacy Group recommended lab tests are individual tests that measure the levels of a specific mineral, protein, or cell, among other things. Are you wondering what lab tests the Magnesium Advocacy Group recommends? This quick yet handy guide breaks things down for you, and we can help you get tested.


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Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

The MAG - Vitamin A&D, Mag RBC, Zinc, Cu, Iron & Ferritin contains the following tests:

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Transferrin
  • Vitamin A (Retinol)
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.


Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Magnesium RBC, Zinc, and Copper  Panel contains the following tests.

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Iron Panel, Transferrin and Hemoglobin

  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb) included in the CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Transferrin

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Magnesium RBC, Zinc, Copper with Iron Panel contains the following tests.

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Transferrin
  • Zinc

 

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Vitamin D (1-25, D2, D3), Mag RBC, & Calcium Panel contains the following tests.

  • Calcium, Ionized
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Vitamin D, 1,25-Dihydroxy, LC/MS/MS

 

  • Magnesium RBC (Red Blood Cell): it’s the KEY catalyst for creating “Storage” and “Active” forms of this Hormone…
  • 25(OH)D blood test: it’s the measure of the “Storage” form, the precursor to “Active” form of this Hormone…
  • 1,25(OH)2 D3 blood test: it’s the measure of the “Active” form of this Hormone…
  • “Ionized” Serum Calcium blood test (NOT a standard serum test!): given that Calcitriol’s JOB in the body is to put MORE Calcium into the bloodstream, it only makes sense to know exactly how much you have there already, right?…

 

 

 



Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Vitamin D (1-25, D2 ,D3), Potassium RBC & Calcium contains the following tests.

  • Calcium, Ionized
  • Potassium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Vitamin D, 1,25-Dihydroxy, LC/MS/MS
     

 

 


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The ionized calcium is determined by an ion selective electrode methodology. The result that is generated is pH adjusted. The result is empirically based on a measured pH and ionized calcium concentration normalized to a pH of 7.40. This calculation compensates for in vitro changes in pH due to loss of CO2 through specimen handling. Ionized calcium represents the true "bioavailable" calcium in the circulation. In situations where the total calcium is normal but does not fit the clinical picture, e.g., hyperparathyroidism, a determination of the ionized calcium will, many times, show an elevation in the "bioavailable" calcium component. This may be due to alterations in protein concentrations, especially albumin, that binds most of the calcium in the circulation.


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Decreased levels of ceruloplasmin are found in Wilson''s Disease, fulminant liver failure, intestinal malabsorption, renal failure resulting in proteinuria, chronic active hepatitis and malnutrition. Elevated levels are found in primary biliary cirrhosis, pregnancy (first trimester), oral contraceptive use and in acute inflammatory conditions since ceruloplasmin is an acute phase reactant

Description: A CBC or Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test is a blood test that measures many important features of your blood’s red and white blood cells and platelets. A Complete Blood Count can be used to evaluate your overall health and detect a wide variety of conditions such as infection, anemia, and leukemia. It also looks at other important aspects of your blood health such as hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. 

Also Known As: CBC test, Complete Blood Count Test, Total Blood Count Test, CBC with Differential and Platelets test, Hemogram test  

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Whole Blood 

Test Preparation: No preparation required 

When is this test ordered?  

The complete blood count (CBC) is an extremely common test. When people go to the doctor for a standard checkup or blood work, they often get a CBC. Suppose a person is healthy and their results are within normal ranges. In that case, they may not need another CBC unless their health condition changes, or their healthcare professional believes it is necessary. 

When a person exhibits a variety of signs and symptoms that could be connected to blood cell abnormalities, a CBC may be done. A health practitioner may request a CBC to help diagnose and determine the severity of lethargy or weakness, as well as infection, inflammation, bruises, or bleeding. 

When a person is diagnosed with a disease that affects blood cells, a CBC is frequently done regularly to keep track of their progress. Similarly, if someone is being treated for a blood condition, a CBC may be performed on a regular basis to see if the treatment is working. 

Chemotherapy, for example, can influence the generation of cells in the bone marrow. Some drugs can lower WBC counts in the long run. To monitor various medication regimens, a CBC may be required on a regular basis. 

What is being tested? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that determines the number of cells in circulation. White blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), and platelets (PLTs) are three types of cells suspended in a fluid called plasma. They are largely created and matured in the bone marrow and are released into the bloodstream when needed under normal circumstances. 

A CBC is mainly performed with an automated machine that measures a variety of factors, including the number of cells present in a person's blood sample. The findings of a CBC can reveal not only the quantity of different cell types but also the physical properties of some of the cells. 

Significant differences in one or more blood cell populations may suggest the presence of one or more diseases. Other tests are frequently performed to assist in determining the reason for aberrant results. This frequently necessitates visual confirmation via a microscope examination of a blood smear. A skilled laboratory technician can assess the appearance and physical features of blood cells, such as size, shape, and color, and note any anomalies. Any extra information is taken note of and communicated to the healthcare provider. This information provides the health care provider with further information about the cause of abnormal CBC results. 

The CBC focuses on three different types of cells: 

WBCs (White Blood Cells) 

The body uses five different types of WBCs, also known as leukocytes, to keep itself healthy and battle infections and other types of harm. The five different leukocytes are eosinophiles, lymphocytes, neutrophiles, basophils, and monocytes. They are found in relatively steady numbers in the blood. Depending on what is going on in the body, these values may momentarily rise or fall. An infection, for example, can cause the body to manufacture more neutrophils in order to combat bacterial infection. The amount of eosinophils in the body may increase as a result of allergies. A viral infection may cause an increase in lymphocyte production. Abnormal (immature or mature) white cells multiply fast in certain illness situations, such as leukemia, raising the WBC count. 

RBCs (Red Blood Cells) 

The bone marrow produces red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes, which are transferred into the bloodstream after maturing. Hemoglobin, a protein that distributes oxygen throughout the body, is found in these cells. Because RBCs have a 120-day lifespan, the bone marrow must constantly manufacture new RBCs to replace those that have aged and disintegrated or have been lost due to hemorrhage. A variety of diseases, including those that cause severe bleeding, can alter the creation of new RBCs and their longevity. 

The CBC measures the number of RBCs and hemoglobin in the blood, as well as the proportion of RBCs in the blood (hematocrit), and if the RBC population appears to be normal. RBCs are generally homogeneous in size and shape, with only minor differences; however, considerable variances can arise in illnesses including vitamin B12 and folate inadequacy, iron deficiency, and a range of other ailments. Anemia occurs when the concentration of red blood cells and/or the amount of hemoglobin in the blood falls below normal, resulting in symptoms such as weariness and weakness. In a far smaller percentage of cases, there may be an excess of RBCs in the blood (erythrocytosis or polycythemia). This might obstruct the flow of blood through the tiny veins and arteries in extreme circumstances. 

Platelets 

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small cell fragments that aid in the regular clotting of blood. A person with insufficient platelets is more likely to experience excessive bleeding and bruises. Excess platelets can induce excessive clotting or excessive bleeding if the platelets are not operating properly. The platelet count and size are determined by the CBC. 

Related Tests and Panels: 

  • CBC (Blood Count Test) with Smear Review
  • Hemoglobin
  • Hematocrit
  • White Blood Cell Count (WBC Test)
  • Reticulocytes
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity
  • Basic Metabolic Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lipid Panel
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate
  • Prothrombin with INR and Partial Thromboplastin Times
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Von Willebrand Factor Antigen

Related Conditions: 

  • Anemia
  • Aplastic Anemia
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Heart Disease
  • Thalassemia
  • Leukemia
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Cancer
  • Bleeding Disorders
  • Inflammation
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Mononucleosis

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How is this type of test used by my health care provider? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a common, comprehensive screening test used to measure a person's overall health status.  

What do my Complete Blood Count results mean? 

A low Red Blood Cell Count, also known as anemia, could be due many different causes such as chronic bleeding, a bone marrow disorder, and nutritional deficiency just to name a few. A high Red Blood Cell Count, also known as polycythemia, could be due to several conditions including lung disease, dehydration, and smoking. Both Hemoglobin and Hematocrit tend to reflect Red Blood Cell Count results, so if your Red Blood Cell Count is low, your Hematocrit and Hemoglobin will likely also be low. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Differential results mean? 

A low White Blood Cell count or low WBC count, also known as leukopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, severe infection, and lymphoma. A high White Blood Cell count, or high WBC count, also known as leukocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including infection, leukemia, and inflammation. Abnormal levels in your White Blood Cell Count will be reflected in one or more of your different white blood cells. Knowing which white blood cell types are affected will help your healthcare provider narrow down the issue. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Platelet results mean? 

A low Platelet Count, also known as thrombocytopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, viral infection, and leukemia. A high Platelet Count, also known as Thrombocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including cancer, iron deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported. Certain biomarkers do not appear in healthy individuals.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical physician for proper interpretation of your results.


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Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Copper concentrations increase in acute phase reactions and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Copper concentrations are decreased with nephrosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients, especially preterm newborns, on nutritional supplementation. Results of copper are often interpreted together with ceruloplasmin.

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Description: A Ferritin test is a blood test that measures Ferritin levels in your blood’s serum to evaluate the level of iron stored in your body.

Also Known As: Ferritin Serum Test, Ferritin Test, Ferritin Blood Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is this test ordered?

When a CBC test’s implies iron deficiency anemia due to small red blood cells or low hematocrit and hemoglobin levels, the ferritin test, and other iron tests, may be requested, even if other clinical symptoms have not yet arisen.

There are frequently no physical symptoms in the early stages of iron insufficiency. Symptoms rarely develop before hemoglobin falls below dangerous levels. However, when the iron deficit continues, symptoms emerge, prompting a doctor to order ferritin and other iron-related testing. The following are the most prevalent symptoms of iron deficiency anemia:

  • Chronic tiredness/fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headaches
  • Skin that is pale

Shortness of breath, ringing in the ears, sleepiness, and irritability may occur as iron levels are reduced. Chest pain, headaches, limb pains, shock, and even heart failure may occur as the anemia worsens. Learning impairments can occur in children. There are some symptoms that are specific to iron deficiency, in addition to the usual signs of anemia. Pica, a burning feeling in the tongue or a smooth tongue, ulcers at the corners of the mouth, and spoon-shaped finger- and toe-nails are only a few of the symptoms.

When iron overload is suspected, a ferritin level may be requested. Iron overload symptoms differ from person to person and tend to worsen over time. They are caused by an excess of iron in the blood and tissues. Among the signs and symptoms are:

  • Joint discomfort
  • Weakness and exhaustion
  • Loss of weight
  • Energy deficiency
  • Pain in the abdomen
  • Suffering from a lack of sexual desire
  • Hair loss on the body
  • Congestive heart failure is an example of a cardiac issue

Other iron tests including a genetic test for hereditary hemochromatosis may be conducted to confirm the existence of iron excess.

What is being tested?

Ferritin is an iron-containing protein that stores iron in cells in its most basic form. The amount of total iron stored in the body is reflected in the little amount of ferritin released into the blood. This test determines how much ferritin is present in the blood.

About 70% of the iron consumed by the body is integrated into the hemoglobin of red blood cells in healthy humans. The remaining 30% is stored primarily as ferritin or hemosiderin, which is a combination of iron, proteins, and other elements. Hemosiderin and ferritin are typically found in the liver, although they can also be found in the bone marrow, spleen, and skeletal muscles.

Iron stores are depleted and ferritin levels fall when available iron is insufficient to meet the body's needs. This can happen owing to a lack of iron, poor absorption, or an increased need for iron, such as during pregnancy or if you have a condition that causes persistent blood loss. Before any indicators of iron shortage appear, significant loss of iron reserves may occur.

When the body absorbs more iron than it needs, iron storage and ferritin levels rise. Chronic iron absorption causes a gradual buildup of iron compounds in organs, which can eventually lead to organ malfunction and failure. Even on a typical diet, this happens in hemochromatosis, a hereditary disorder in which the body absorbs too much iron.

Related Tests and Panels:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Iron Total
  • Iron Total and Total Iron binding capacity
  • Transferrin
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lipid Panel
  • Zinc Protoporphyrin

Related Conditions:

  • Anemia
  • Hemochromatosis
  • Lead poisoning
  • Pregnancy
  • Restless Leg Syndrome

How is this test used by my health care provider?

The ferritin test is used to determine the amount of iron a person has in their body. To determine the existence and severity of iron shortage or iron overload, the test is sometimes ordered in conjunction with an iron test and a TIBC test.

One source of iron overload can be the use of iron supplements.

What does my ferritin lab test result mean?

Ferritin levels are frequently measured alongside other iron tests.

Ferritin levels are low in iron deficient people and high in people who have hemochromatosis or have had several blood transfusions.

Ferritin is an acute phase reactant that can be elevated in persons who have inflammation, liver illness, chronic infection, autoimmune disorders, or cancer. Ferritin isn't commonly utilized to detect or monitor these problems.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical physician for proper interpretation of your results.


Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's Full Monty Panel contains the following tests:

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Transferrin
  • Vitamin A (Retinol)
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.


Usual method for determining anemia. Used to calculate indices.

Description: Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity is a blood panel used to determine iron levels in your blood, your body’s ability to transport iron, and help diagnose iron-deficiency and iron overload.

Also Known As: Serum Iron Test, Serum Fe Test, Iron Binding Capacity Test, IBC Test, Serum Iron-Binding Capacity Siderophilin Test, TIBC Test, UIBC Test, Iron Lab Test, TIBC Blood test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is this test ordered?

When a doctor feels that a person's symptoms are caused by iron overload or poisoning, an iron and TIBC test, as well ferritin assays, may be done. These may include the following:

  • Joint discomfort
  • Weakness and exhaustion
  • Energy deficiency
  • Pain in the abdomen
  • Suffering from a lack of sexual desire
  • Problems with the heart

When a child is suspected of ingesting too many iron tablets, a serum iron test is required to detect the poisoning and to determine its severity.

A doctor may also request iron and TIBC when the results of a standard CBC test are abnormal, such as a low hematocrit or hemoglobin, or when a doctor suspects iron deficiency based on signs and symptoms such as:

  • Chronic tiredness/fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Weakness
  • Headaches
  • Skin that is pale

What is being tested?

Iron is a necessary ingredient for survival. It is a vital component of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that binds and releases oxygen in the lungs and throughout the body. It is required in small amounts to help form normal red blood cells and is a critical part of hemoglobin, the protein in RBCs that binds oxygen in the lungs and releases it as blood circulates to other parts of the body.

By detecting numerous components in the blood, iron tests are ordered to determine the quantity of iron in the body. These tests are frequently ordered at the same time, and the data are analyzed together to determine the diagnosis and/or monitor iron deficiency or overload.

The level of iron in the liquid component of the blood is measured by serum iron.

Total iron-binding capacity is a measurement of all the proteins in the blood that may bind to iron, including transferrin.

The percentage of transferrin that has not yet been saturated is measured by the UIBC. Transferrin levels are also reflected in the UIBC.

Low iron levels can cause anemia, resulting in a decrease in the production of microcytic and hypochromic RBCs. Large amounts of iron, on the other hand, might be hazardous to the body. When too much iron is absorbed over time, iron compounds build up in tissues, particularly the liver, heart, and pancreas.

Normally, iron is absorbed from food and distributed throughout the body by binding to transferrin, a liver protein. About 70% of the iron delivered is used in the synthesis of hemoglobin in red blood cells. The rest is stored as ferritin or hemosiderin in the tissues, with minor amounts being utilized to make other proteins like myoglobin and enzymes.

Insufficient intake, limited absorption, or increased dietary requirements, as observed during pregnancy or with acute or chronic blood loss, are all signs of iron deficiency. Excessive intake of iron pills can cause acute iron overload, especially in children. Excessive iron intake, genetic hemochromatosis, multiple blood transfusions, and a few other disorders can cause chronic iron overload.

Related Tests and Panels:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Ferritin
  • Transferrin
  • Zinc Protoporphyrin

Related Conditions:

  • Anemia
  • Hemochromatosis

How is this test used by my health care provider?

The amount of circulating iron in the blood, the capacity of the blood to carry iron, and the amount of stored iron in tissues can all be determined by ordering one or more tests. Testing can also assist distinguish between different types of anemia

The level of iron in the blood is measured by serum iron.

Total iron-binding capacity is a measurement of all the proteins in the blood that may bind to iron, including transferrin. The TIBC test is a useful indirect assessment of transferrin because it is the predominant iron-binding protein. In response to the requirement for iron, the body generates transferrin. Transferrin levels rise when iron levels are low, and vice versa. About one-third of the binding sites on transferrin are used to transport iron in healthy humans.

The reserve capacity of transferrin, or the part of transferrin that has not yet been saturated, is measured by UIBC. Transferrin levels are also reflected in the UIBC.

The iron test result, as well as TIBC or UIBC, are used to calculate transferrin saturation. It represents the proportion of transferrin that is iron-saturated.

Ferritin is the major storage protein for iron inside cells, and serum ferritin represents the quantity of stored iron in the body.

These tests are frequently ordered together, and the results can assist the doctor figure out what's causing the iron deficit or overload.

Additional information about iron

A balance between the quantity of iron received into the body and the amount of iron lost is required to maintain normal iron levels. Because a tiny quantity of iron is lost each day, a deficiency will develop if too little iron is consumed. In healthy persons, there is usually enough iron to prevent iron deficiency and/or iron deficiency anemia, unless they eat a bad diet. There is a greater need for iron in some circumstances. People who have persistent gut bleeding or women who have heavy menstrual periods lose more iron than they should and can develop iron deficiency. Females who are pregnant or breastfeeding lose iron to their babies and may develop an iron shortage if they do not consume enough supplemental iron. Children may require additional iron, especially during periods of rapid growth, and may suffer iron shortage.

Low serum iron can also arise when the body is unable to adequately utilize iron. The body cannot correctly utilize iron to generate additional red cells in many chronic disorders, particularly malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and chronic infections. As a result, transferrin production slows, serum iron levels drop because little iron is absorbed from the stomach, and ferritin levels rise. Malabsorption illnesses like sprue syndrome can cause iron deficiency.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical physician for proper interpretation of your results.


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Transferrin is a direct measure of the iron binding capacity. Transferrin is thus useful in assessing iron balance. Iron deficiency and overload are often evaluated with complementary laboratory tests.

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Vitamin A is critical for vision, growth, and many cell functions. High concentrations of vitamin A are seen with renal failure, but this is not associated with toxicity, and excessive ingestion. High concentrations are associated with bone fractures. Low concentrations of vitamin A are consistent with fat malabsorption and rarely due to inadequate diet. Vitamin A, vitamin E, and carotene are always extracted and detected simultaneously. This is a free vitamin A (retinol

This test is used to measure the bio-active form of Vitamin D. This test is also used in the differential diagnosis of hypocalcemia and to monitor patients with renal osteodystrophy or chronic renal failure.

Measurement of serum 25-OH vitamin D concentrations provide a good index of circulating vitamin D activity in patients not suffering from renal disease. Lower than normal 25-OH vitamin D levels can result from a dietary deficiency, poor absorption of the vitamin or impaired metabolism of the sterol in the liver. A 25-OH vitamin D deficiency can lead to bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Above normal levels can lead hypercalcemia. This assay employs liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to independently measure and report the two common forms of 25-hydroxy vitamin D: 25OH D3 - the endogenous form of the vitamin and 25OH D2 - the analog form used to treat 25OH Vitamin D3 deficiency.

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Zinc is an essential element involved in a myriad of enzyme systems including wound healing, immune function, and fetal development. Zinc measurements are used to detect and monitor industrial, dietary, and accidental exposure to zinc. Also, zinc measurements may be used to evaluate health and monitor response to treatment.



Magnesium is essential for strong bones and muscles, good heart health, and energy production.

Despite how important this mineral is, it can be easy to miss the signs of magnesium deficiency. With Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests, you can catch symptoms and get the necessary treatment sooner.

Here's a guide on Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests and panels, what they test for, and how they can benefit you.

What Are Magnesium Advocacy Group Lab Tests and Lab Panels?

Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests and panels evaluate your body's magnesium levels and many other vital vitamins and minerals through blood draws.

The Magnesium Advocacy Group recommended lab tests are individual tests that measure the levels of specific vitamins and minerals. Lab panels are groupings of related tests.

Iron Panel, Transferrin, and Hemoglobin

Iron panels are typically used when a person displays symptoms of having iron deficiency or overload. They measure iron levels and related biomarkers, including:

  • Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Ferritin
  • Transferrin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)

The average processing time is 1-2 days. Patients should fast for at least 9 hours prior to having their blood drawn.

Magnesium RBC, Zinc, and Copper Panel

This panel tests for Magnesium RBC and other related biomarkers, including:

  • Zinc
  • Copper
  • Ceruloplasmin

The average processing time for this panel is 2-4 business days.

Magnesium RBC, Zinc, Copper with Iron Panel

The tests included in this panel are: 

  • Magnesium RBC
  • Copper
  • Zinc
  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Ferritin
  • Transferrin
  • Hemoglobin

The average processing time for this panel is 2-5 days. Patients should fast for at least 9 hours prior to having their blood drawn.

Vit A&D, Mag RBC, Zinc, Iron & Ferritin

This panel is also referred to as the Full Monty Iron Panel with Vitamin A and D. The tests included in this panel are:

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium RBC
  • Transferrin
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin D
  • Zinc

The average processing time is 4-7 days. Patients should fast for at least 9 hours prior to having their blood drawn.

Vitamin D (1-25, D2, D3), Mag RBC & Calcium

The tests included in this panel are:

  • Magnesium RBC
  • Vitamin D, 1, 25-Dihydroxy
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy
  • Calcium, Ionized

The average processing time is 5-7 business days.

Vitamin D (1-25,D2,D3), Potassium RBC & Ca

The tests included in this panel are:

  • Potassium RBC
  • Magnesium RBC
  • Ionized Calcium
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy
  • Vitamin D, 1, 25-Dihydroxy

The average processing time for a Potassium Vitamin D Panel is 5-7 business days.

Vitamin D, Magnesium RBC, Zinc, Copper & Ca

The tests included in this panel are:

  • Magnesium RBC
  • Zinc
  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ionized Calcium
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy
  • Vitamin D, 1, 25-Dihydroxy

The average processing time is 5-7 business days.

Calcium, Ionized

The Calcium, Ionized test measures how much unbound calcium is in a person's blood.

Unbound calcium is typically measured when the balance between free and bound calcium is disrupted, which can occur with:

  • Extremely low albumin levels
  • Major surgeries
  • Blood transfusions
  • Critical illnesses

Those with low ionized calcium may experience muscle spasms or numbness around the mouth or in their hands and feet.

The average processing time is 1-2 business days, and it has no fasting requirements.

Ceruloplasmin and Copper

Ceruloplasmin is a protein containing copper, an essential mineral for a variety of bodily functions.

Ceruloplasmin and copper blood tests help diagnose diseases that cause abnormal levels of copper in the body, including Wilson's Disease, Celiac Disease, and Cystic Fibrosis. 

The average processing time for a Ceruloplasmin blood test is 4-5 days. It has no fasting requirements and is often accompanied by a copper blood test, which has an average processing time of 2-4 days.

Complete Blood Count and Hemoglobin 

Hemoglobin (Hgb) and Complete Blood Count (CBC) are part of routine general health blood work.

Hgb is a protein that carries oxygen throughout the body. 

Low Hgb levels can indicate anemia, nutritional deficiencies, bone marrow disorders, or kidney damage. High Hgb levels may indicate dehydration, lung disease, heart disease, or kidney tumors. 

The average processing time for Hgb and CBC blood tests is typically 1 day.

Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity

Total Iron Binding Capacity is a blood test that measures the amount of iron you have in your blood and how well the protein transferrin carries the iron in your blood.

The average processing time for a TIBC test is 1-2 days.

Iron helps muscles store and use oxygen, and too little iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Low iron levels may occur from blood loss, poor diet, or inefficient absorption of iron from food.

Ferritin

Ferritin is a protein that stores iron inside the body's cells. By measuring ferritin, doctors can indirectly measure the amount of iron in your blood.

Ferritin blood tests are often ordered after a person receives abnormal CBC results and may be accompanied by an Iron and TIBC Test to check for iron deficiency or overload.

The average processing time of a Ferritin blood test is typically 1 day.

Magnesium, RBC

Magnesium is essential for almost all of the body's chemical processes, including the maintenance of the body's:

  • Muscle and nerve function
  • Bone strength
  • Heart function
  • Blood pressure
  • Blood sugar levels
  • Immune system

Magnesium deficiencies may occur in cases of malnutrition and malabsorption. Magnesium excess may occur from ingesting antacids containing magnesium or when the kidneys excrete magnesium ineffectively.

The average processing time for a Magnesium RBC lab test is 4-5 days.

Potassium, RBC

Potassium is an electrolyte that is important for body and muscle function. Abnormal potassium levels may indicate kidney disease, diabetes, or thyroid disorder, among other conditions.

The average processing time is 5 to 7 days.

Transferrin

Transferrin is a protein that helps carry iron to various parts of the body. It directly measures iron-binding capacity. This makes it useful in the assessment of iron balance, deficiency, and overload.

The typical processing time is 1-3 days, and it is necessary to fast 8-12 hours before blood sample collection.

Vitamin A (Retinol)

Vitamin A is essential for:

  • Healthy skin
  • Healthy eyes and vision
  • Bone growth
  • Immune function
  • Embryonic development

Vitamin A deficiency may occur if a person does not eat enough meat, fruits, and vegetables. Disorders associated with malnutrition or malabsorption can also cause it.

Symptoms of Vitamin A deficiency include:

  • Night blindness
  • Dry eyes, skin, or hair
  • Skin lesions
  • Anemia
  • Gray spots on the eye's lining
  • Repeated infections

Retinol tests also check for Vitamin A toxicity. This typically occurs because of supplement overuse or a diet that consists largely of Vitamin A rich foods.

The average processing time for a Vitamin A (retinol) lab test is 3-7 business days. It is necessary to fast for 12 hours before having your sample collected.

Vitamin D, 1, 25-Dihydroxy

Vitamin D, 1, 25-Dihydroxy is typically ordered to test for an excess of Vitamin D. This can occur with conditions such as parathyroid disorder and kidney failure.

The average processing time is 5-7 business days.

Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy

Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy is necessary for teeth and bones to have proper growth and health. It also helps the immune system and bodily tissues develop healthily.

A Vitamin D lab test is usually ordered to test for symptoms of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is usually caused by insufficient sun exposure or conditions like Cystic Fibrosis and Crohn's Disease. Symptoms of Vitamin D deficiency include:

  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Aches and pains
  • Frequent infections

The typical processing time is 1-3 days, and it has no fasting requirements.

Zinc

Zinc is essential for a strong immune system, normal growth and cell reproduction, and healing from injuries.

Zinc deficiency occurs from a lack of dietary intake or an excess of certain minerals, which prevent the body from effectively absorbing zinc. It may also occur with conditions such as Crohn's Disease and Sickle Cell Anemia.

Symptoms include:

  • Recurring infections
  • Decreased speed of healing
  • Severe diarrhea
  • Thinning hair
  • Recurring skin rashes or acne
  • Decreased ability to taste or smell

The typical processing time is 3-5 days, and there are no fasting requirements.

Benefits of Magnesium Advocacy Group Recommended Lab Tests and Lab Panels

Magnesium is essential for energy production, nerve and muscle function, and maintaining strong bones.

Persistent or severe magnesium deficiency or excess can lead to:

  • Nausea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue
  • Confusion
  • Muscle cramps
  • Seizures
  • Heart Rate changes
  • Numbness or tingling
  • An affected calcium metabolism
  • Exacerbated calcium deficiencies

With Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests and panels, you can potentially catch these health issues and get the appropriate treatments before they get any worse.

Magnesium Advocacy Group FAQ

Here are some common questions about Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests.

When Are Magnesium Lab Tests Ordered?

Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests are used to measure magnesium levels. Abnormal magnesium levels may indicate conditions that impair intestinal magnesium absorption or cause the kidneys to excrete abnormal amounts of magnesium.

Magnesium lab tests are ordered to:

  • Evaluate the severity of kidney problems and uncontrolled diabetes
  • Evaluate diarrhea
  • Evaluate alcoholism
  • Help diagnose gastrointestinal disorders and certain hormone conditions
  • Monitor the effectiveness of a treatment
  • Check for malabsorption or malnutrition

When to Get Tested?

Lab tests are recommended if you are experiencing symptoms associated with abnormal levels of magnesium, including:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Irritability
  • Twitching
  • Cramping
  • Confusion
  • Cardiac arrhythmia
  • Seizures
  • Nausea
  • Diarrhea

Magnesium Advocacy Group tests are also recommended if you have abnormal calcium or potassium levels or when you have been prescribed magnesium for treatment purposes.

Benefits of Magnesium Advocacy Group Recommended Lab Testing with Ulta Lab Tests

Ulta Lab Tests offers highly accurate and reliable tests so that you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are a few great things to love about Ulta Lab Tests:

  • You'll get secure and confidential results.
  • You don't need health insurance.
  • You don't need a physician's referral.
  • You'll get affordable pricing.
  • We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Order your Magnesium Advocacy Group lab tests today, and your results will be provided to you online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.


Take control with Ulta Lab Tests today!