Antiphospholipid Syndrome

Antiphospholipid Syndrome Lab Tests and health information

The antiphospholipid syndrome tests can help identify the three abnormal antiphospholipid antibodies: anticardiolipin, beta-2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI), and lupus anticoagulant that increases the risk of blood clots. Order from Ulta Lab Tests today, with confidential results available in 24 to 48 hours online.      

Below the list of tests is a guide that explains and answers your questions on what you need to know about antiphospholipid syndrome tests, along with information on antiphospholipid syndrome, signs, symptoms, and diagnosis.


Name Matches
Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1, apolipoprotein H, is a cofactor in antiphospholipid antibody binding and is the critical antigen in the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1 Antibody is more specific than Cardiolipin Antibody that may express reactivity in patients with syphilis and other infectious diseases

Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1, apolipoprotein H, is a cofactor in antiphospholipid antibody binding and is the critical antigen in the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1 Antibody is more specific than cardiolipin antibody that may express reactivity in patients with syphilis and other infectious diseases.

Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1, apolipoprotein H, is a cofactor in antiphospholipid antibody binding and is the critical antigen in the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1 Antibody is more specific than cardiolipin antibody that may express reactivity in patients with syphilis and other infectious diseases.

Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1, apolipoprotein H, is a cofactor in antiphospholipid antibody binding and is the critical antigen in the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. Beta-2-Glycoprotein 1 Antibody is more specific than cardiolipin antibody that may express reactivity in patients with syphilis and other infectious diseases.

Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Cardiolipin antibodies (CA) are seen in a subgroup of patients with autoimmune disorders, particularly Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), who are at risk for vascular thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, cerebral infarct and/or recurrent spontaneous abortion. Elevations of CA associated with increased risk have also been seen in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Lupus anticoagulants (LA) are members of a family of antibodies with phospholipid specificity. LA may be defined as an immunoglobulin, IgG or IgM or a mixture of both, that interferes with one or more of the in vitro phospholipid (PL) dependent tests of coagulation. These antibodies are not associated with a hemorrhagic diathesis, but rather have been linked to thrombotic events. In addition to thrombosis other clinical complications have been associated with the presence of LA. These include strokes, nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, livedo reticularis and a variety of obstetrical complications such as intrauterine fetal death, recurrent spontaneous abortion, fetal growth retardation, early onset preeclampsia and chorea gravidarum.

ANAlyzeR™ ANA, IFA with Reflex Titer/Pattern, Systemic Autoimmune Panel 1

Includes

  • ANA Screen,IFA, with Reflex to Titer and Pattern
  • DNA (ds) Antibody, Crithidia IFA with Reflex to Titer
  • Chromatin (Nucleosomal) Antibody
  • Sm Antibody
  • Sm/RNP Antibody
  • RNP Antibody
  • Sjogren's Antibodies (SS-A, SS-B)
  • Scleroderma Antibody (Scl-70)
  • Jo-1 Antibody
  • Centromere B Antibody
  • Complement Component C3c and C4c
  • Cardiolipin Antibodies (IgA, IgG, IgM)
  • Beta-2-Glycoprotein I Antibodies (IgG, IgA, IgM)
  • Rheumatoid Factor (IgA, IgG, IgM)
  • Cyclic Citrullinated Peptide (CCP) Antibody (IgG)
  • 14.3.3 eta Protein
  • Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO)

 

  • If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86039).
  • If the DNA (ds) Antibody Screen is positive, then DNA (ds) Antibody Titer will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 86256).

 

Alternative Name(s)

Expanded ANA Antibodies,Systemic Autoimmune Disorder,ANA and Expanded AI Testing,ANA and Systemic Autoimmunity,Comprehensive AI Testing,Early Systemic Autoimmune Disease,Autoimmune Disorders


A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia, and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported.

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

Screening test for deficiencies of plasma coagulation factors other than Factors VII and XIII. The test is also used to monitor patients on heparin therapy.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phospholipid autoantibodies specific to phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidic acid (PA), cardiolipin (CL) and sphingomyelin are found in hematologic autoimmune diseases, especially anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). APS is characterized by arterial and venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and recurrent fetal loss; thrombosis, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia also occur in SLE and are associated with the presence of phospholipid autoantibodies.

Phosphatidylserine antibody is used to assist in the diagnosis, management, and possible prevention of thrombotic complications as part of the Phospholipid Syndrome.


Clinical Significance

Laboratory testing for Antiphospholipid Antibody is useful in assisting in the diagnosis, management, and possible prevention of thrombotic complications. More specifically, evaluation of Antiphosphatidylserine IgA, IgG, and IgM may be potentially useful in this context.



It has been reported that, on average, 274 people are killed by blood clots every day in the US alone. There is a veritable laundry list of risk factors associated with blood clot formation. Some of them, like spending too much time sitting down, recent surgery, or obesity, are pretty obvious.

But one of the most subtle potential causes of blood clots is an autoimmune disorder known as antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which can only be diagnosed by performing antiphospholipid syndrome tests.

To learn more about this potentially deadly condition—and the absolute best way to test for it—keep reading.

About Antiphospholipid Syndrome

Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which may also be referred to as Hughs syndrome, lupus anticoagulant disease, or anticardiolipin antibody (aCL) syndrome, is an autoimmune disease. This type of disease causes your body to go to war against itself.

When it's functioning as it should, your immune system identifies threats posed to your body from the outside (e.g., bacteria, viruses, foreign bodies). It then responds to them by releasing the appropriate countermeasure. This can range from triggering a fever to deploying specialized cells that physically destroy the threat.

This all goes catastrophically wrong when the immune system's means of identifying a threat—proteins known as antibodies—marks some of the body's own tissues for the attack. In the case of APS, the body creates antibodies that attack phospholipids, which are a type of fat that is found in all living cells.

Now, your blood cells are living cells, and so are the ones that make up the linings of your blood vessels. If your immune system is on the hunt for phospholipids, they are going to wreak havoc on your circulatory system. And any trauma to your circulatory system leads to the creation of blood clots.

But too much of a good thing is never a good thing.

An overabundance of blood clots can lead to, among other things, stroke, heart attack, deep vein thrombosis, and kidney failure. It can even lead to pregnant women who are suffering from the condition to experience premature births, miscarriages, eclampsia. In fact, one-fifth of women who suffer from recurring miscarriages have been found to have APS. 

Risk Factors

Although antiphospholipid syndrome affects both sexes, it is more common in females. And although the disorder occurs in patients of all ages, APS does more commonly affect females of child-bearing age. 

Furthermore, APS is more likely to occur in those already suffering from other autoimmune disorders such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. In fact, APS affects 10% of those suffering from lupus.

Other factors that aren't related to other autoimmune conditions, but still pose an increased risk, include smoking, prolonged bed rest, pregnancy, cancer, kidney disease, the use of birth control pills, and being treated with hormone therapy.

Signs or Symptoms

The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in an individual doesn't necessarily mean that they'll show any signs of antiphospholipid syndrome. However, there are some sure signs that an antiphospholipid syndrome test should be taken, all of which are related to the complications that blood clots can cause.

Major Signs

  • Shortness of breath
  • Stroke
  • Transient ischemic attacks (a sort of short-lived stroke)
  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • High blood pressure
  • Angina (chest pain caused by decreased blood flow to the heart muscle)
  • Heart attack
  • Swelling, redness, and sensitivity in the limbs
  • Persistent headaches
  • Changes in speech
  • Discomfort in the upper body (i.e., arms, back, neck, and jaw)
  • Nausea

Minor Signs

  • Heart valve issues
  • Loss of vision or other disturbances
  • Diminished balance or mobility
  • Difficulty concentrating

Lab Tests for APS

Antiphospholipid syndrome must be diagnosed accurately so that it can be treated effectively. This can also help rule out other potential causes of the above complications.

The substances most commonly tested for in the lab (via blood testing) when seeking a diagnosis of APS are:

Results should be consistent across at least two blood tests that are taken 12 or more weeks apart.

Other tests might be ordered for the evaluation of blood cells and clotting. These might include: 

Other additional tests for evaluating other potential causes of symptoms, like a 1:1 Mix study (dilute PTT) for screening the blood for lupus anticoagulant.

Because the presence of the above autoantibodies in the blood doesn't necessarily lead to symptoms, a positive diagnosis can only be made by considering clinical indicators. These include the occurrence of abnormal clotting in any blood vessels, which must be verified by imaging (e.g., CT scan, MRI, ECG) or tissue biopsy.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a cure for antiphospholipid syndrome?

Unfortunately, although research is ongoing, there is no cure for APS at present. However, medications are available that can help treat its symptoms and prevent further complications.

What kind of medication will I need to take to manage my APS?

Your doctor may prescribe you anticoagulant medications ("blood thinners") like heparin, warfarin, and/or aspirin. To ensure that these drugs don't decrease your blood's ability to clot so much that you develop potentially life-threatening conditions like internal bleeding, your doctor may want to perform other blood tests (like the PT test) regularly while you're on them.

If you're curious about having us at Ulta Lab Tests take care of your blood testing, here are some more quick answers about that.

Your Antiphospholipid Syndrome Tests

Getting blood work done for antiphospholipid syndrome tests can be costly, complicated, and time-consuming, but we at Ulta Lab Tests have endeavored to make the process as affordable and convenient as possible. All of our tests have been specially designed with accuracy and reliability in mind, allowing you to make the best-informed decision you can.

You can learn more about how it all works here.

You can easily take charge of your health by ordering your own APS antibody panel with us. Results will be provided to you online, securely, and confidentially within 24 to 48 hours. No insurance or referral is needed, and the doctor's order is included in the price.

And most importantly, Ulta Lab Tests offers a 100% satisfaction guarantee!