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27 Essential Vitamins and Minerals to Spot Deficiencies

  • Calcium [ 303 ]
  • Carotene [ 311 ]
  • Chloride [ 330 ]
  • Cholinesterase, Serum [ 37965 ]
  • Copper [ 363 ]
  • Iodine, Serum/Plasma [ 16599 ]
  • Iron, Total [ 571 ]
  • Magnesium [ 622 ]
  • Molybdenum, Serum/Plasma [ 6213 ]
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus) [ 718 ]
  • Potassium [ 733 ]
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS [ 92888 ]
  • Selenium [ 5507 ]
  • Sodium [ 836 ]
  • Vitamin A (Retinol) [ 921 ]
  • Vitamin B1 (Thiamine), LC/MS/MS [ 90353 ]
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum [ 7065 ]
  • Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin), Plasma [ 36399 ]
  • Vitamin B3 (Nicotinic acid) [ 91029 ]
  • Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) [ 91030 ]
  • Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal Phosphate ) [ 926 ]
  • Vitamin B7 (Biotin) [ 391 ]
  • Vitamin C [ 929 ]
  • Vitamin D, 1,25-Dihydroxy, LC/MS/MS [ 16558 ]
  • Vitamin E (Tocopherol) [ 931 ]
  • Vitamin K [ 36585 ]
  • Zinc [ 945 ]
     












  • Ferritin [ 457 ]
  • Iodine, Serum/Plasma [ 16599 ]
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC) [ 7573 ]
  • Magnesium [ 622 ]
  • Selenium [ 5507 ]
  • Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy, Total, Immunoassay [ 17306 ]
  • Zinc [ 945 ]

Most Popular

Description: This test will measure the amount of retinol in the blood. It can be used to determine if there is too much vitamin A or not enough vitamin A in the blood.

Also Known As: Retinol test

Collection Method: Blood draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Overnight fasting is preferred

When is a Vitamin A test ordered?

When a person shows signs and symptoms that point to a vitamin A deficiency or is malnourished in general, a vitamin A test may be recommended. The following are some of the signs and symptoms:

  • Blindness at night
  • Eyes, skin, and hair that are dry
  • Damage to and ulcers on the cornea
  • Lesions and thickening of the skin
  • On the lining of the eyes, there are grayish patches.
  • Infections that recur
  • Anemia

When a person has an illness that causes malabsorption of nutrients, testing may be done on a regular basis to check vitamin A status and ensure that the individual is getting enough vitamin A. Inadequate vitamin A absorption has been linked to the following diseases:

  • Celiac disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Crohn's disease

When a person exhibits signs and symptoms of vitamin A poisoning and their medical history is compatible with the ingestion of vitamin A-containing foods or supplements, testing may be undertaken. The following are some of the indications and symptoms of vitamin A toxicity:

  • Headache
  • Vomiting and nausea
  • Vision that is doubled or blurred
  • Fatigue
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Seizures
  • Irritability
  • Muscle ache
  • Joint and bone discomfort
  • Loss of weight
  • Hair loss
  • Dryness of the mucous membranes
  • Itching
  • Dysfunction of the liver
  • At the corners of the mouth, there are cracks
  • Tongue inflammation

What does a Vitamin A blood test check for?

This test examines the amount of retinol in the blood; in animals, retinol is the most common form of vitamin A. Vitamin A is necessary for proper vision, skin growth and integrity, bone formation, immunological function, and embryonic development. It is essential for the production of photoreceptors in the eyes as well as the maintenance of the lining of the eye's surface and other mucous membranes. Vitamin A deficiency can impair night vision, induce eye damage, and even result in blindness in severe situations. Vitamin A excesses, whether acute or chronic, can be hazardous, resulting in a variety of symptoms and, in rare cases, birth abnormalities.

Vitamin A is not produced by the body, so it must be obtained from food. Vitamin A is found in meat, while carotene is found in vegetables and fruits. Vitamin A is stored in the liver and adipose tissues, with healthy people storing up to a year's worth. Through a feedback system that releases vitamin A from storage as needed and enhances or decreases the efficiency of dietary vitamin A absorption, the body maintains a reasonably steady concentration in the blood.

Vitamin A deficiency is uncommon in the United States, but it is a major health issue in many underdeveloped countries where people have poor diets. Night blindness is one of the first indicators of vitamin A insufficiency. The World Health Organization estimated that night blindness impacted as many as 5 million preschool age children and nearly 10 million pregnant women in a 1995-2005 study of the global incidence of vitamin A deficiency in populations at risk. In addition, they calculated that 190 million preschool children and 19 million pregnant women were at danger of vitamin A deficiency due to low retinol levels, which indicated a lack of vitamin A supply.

Deficits are most common among malnourished people, those with malabsorption disorders such celiac disease, cystic fibrosis, or chronic pancreatitis, the elderly, and those with alcoholism and liver disease in the United States.

Overuse of vitamin supplements is the leading cause of vitamin A toxicity. It can, however, happen when the diet contains a significant amount of vitamin A-rich foods, such as liver.

Lab tests often ordered with a Vitamin A test:

  • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folate
  • Vitamin D
  • Iron Total
  • Iron and TIBC

Conditions where a Vitamin A test is recommended:

  • Malnutrition
  • Celiac Disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Pancreatitis
  • Anemia
  • Alcoholism
  • Liver Disease
  • Malabsorption

How does my health care provider use a Vitamin A test?

Vitamin A testing is used to diagnose vitamin A deficiency in patients who have symptoms like night blindness or who have disorders that limit nutritional absorption in the intestine and are at risk of deficiency. Vitamin A deficiency is uncommon in the United States, hence testing for this purpose is uncommon. Testing is sometimes performed to detect hazardous levels of vitamin A induced by ingesting high doses of the vitamin.

Vitamin A is necessary for proper vision, skin growth and integrity, bone formation, immunological function, and embryonic development. It is essential for the production of photoreceptors in the eyes as well as the maintenance of the lining of the eye's surface and other mucous membranes.

Vitamin A is not produced by the body, so it must be obtained from food. Vitamin A is found in meat, while carotene is found in vegetables and fruits. Vitamin A deficiency can impair night vision, induce eye damage, and even result in blindness in severe situations. Vitamin A excesses, whether acute or chronic, can be hazardous, resulting in a variety of symptoms and, in rare cases, birth abnormalities.

What do my Vitamin A test results mean?

A normal vitamin A blood level suggests that a person has enough vitamin A right now, but it doesn't tell you how much vitamin A is held in reserve. Until vitamin A stores are depleted, the body will keep vitamin A levels in the blood at a reasonably constant level.

A low vitamin A blood test result means that the person's reserves have been depleted and they are deficient.

A high vitamin A blood level implies that the body's ability to retain vitamin A has been exceeded, and that excess vitamin A is currently circulating in the bloodstream, where it may be deposited in other tissues, causing toxicity.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Thiamine, or vitamin B1, is involved in a number of functions in the body, including nervous system (axonal conduction) and muscular functioning (electrolyte flow in these cells), carbohydrate metabolism, enzymatic processes, and production of hydrochloric acid needed for digestion.

Vitamin B1 deficiency is most often associated with alcoholism, chronic illness and following gastric by-pass surgery. Prolonged deficiency causes beriberi. Plasma vitamin B1 is useful in evaluating nutritional assessment and compliance, while whole blood vitamin B1 is useful in evaluating body stores.


Description: A Vitamin B12 test is a blood test that measures the level of Vitamin B12 in the blood’s serum and is used to detect Vitamin B12 deficiency.

Also Known As:  B12 Test, Cobalamin Test, Vitamin B12 test, Serum B12 Test 

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Serum 

Test Preparation: No preparation required. 

When is a Vitamin B12 test ordered?  

When a complete blood count and/or blood smear, performed as part of a health checkup or anemia evaluation, reveal a low red blood cell count with the presence of big RBCs, vitamin B12 levels may be ordered. A high mean corpuscular volume implies that the RBCs have grown in size. 

When a person exhibits the following signs and symptoms of a deficit, testing for B12 levels may be necessary: 

  • Diarrhea 
  • Dizziness 
  • Muscle weakness, fatigue 
  • Appetite loss. 
  • Skin that is pale 
  • Irregular heartbeats, rapid heart rate 
  • Breathing problems 
  • Tongue and mouth ache 
  • In the feet, hands, arms, and legs, there is tingling, numbness, and/or burning 
  • Confusion or obliviousness 
  • Paranoia 

When a person is at risk of deficiency, such as those with a history of malnutrition or a condition associated to malabsorption, B12 tests may be required. 

Individuals being treated for malnutrition or a B12 or folate deficit may have these tests done on a frequent basis to see how effective their treatments are. This could be part of a long-term therapy plan for people who have a disease that causes chronic deficiency.  

What does a Vitamin B12 blood test check for? 

Vitamin B12 is a member of the vitamin B complex. It is required for the creation of normal red blood cells, tissue and cell healing, and the synthesis of DNA, the genetic material in cells. Vitamin B12 is a nutrient that the body cannot make and must be obtained through the diet. 

Vitamin B12 deficiency is detected by measuring vitamin B12 in the liquid portion of the blood. 

A B12 deficiency can cause macrocytic anemia, which is characterized by red blood cells that are bigger than normal. Megaloblastic anemia is a kind of macrocytic anemia marked by the generation of fewer but larger RBCs known as macrocytes, as well as cellular abnormalities in the bone marrow. Reduced white blood cell and platelet count are two other test results linked to megaloblastic anemia. 

B12 is also necessary for nerve function, and a lack of it can induce neuropathy, which causes tingling and numbness in the hands and feet of those who are affected. 

B12 deficiency is most commonly caused by a lack of vitamin B12 in the diet or supplements, insufficient absorption, or an increased requirement, such as during pregnancy. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Vitamin B12 test: 

  • Folate 
  • Methylmalonic Acid (MMA) 
  • Homocysteine 
  • Vitamin B1 
  • Vitamin B2 
  • Vitamin B3 
  • Vitamin B5 
  • Vitamin B6 
  • Vitamin B7 
  • Rheumatoid factor 

Conditions where a Vitamin B12 test is recommended:

  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency 
  • Pernicious Anemia 
  • Nerve Damage 
  • Malabsorption 
  • Malnutrition 

How does my health care provider use a Vitamin B12 test? 

Vitamin B12 and folate are frequently used in conjunction to detect deficiencies and to aid in the diagnosis of anemias such as pernicious anemia, an inflammatory condition that inhibits B12 absorption. 

B12 and folate are two vitamins that the body cannot generate and must be obtained from the diet. They are essential for the creation of normal red blood cells, tissue and cell repair, and the synthesis of DNA, the genetic material in cells. B12 is required for normal nerve function. 

B12 and folate tests can also be used to assess someone who is experiencing mental or behavioral changes, especially in the elderly. A B12 test can be ordered with or without folate, as well as with other screening laboratory tests like a complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, antinuclear antibody, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor to help determine why a person is exhibiting signs and symptoms of a nerve condition. 

B12 and folate tests can also be performed in conjunction with a variety of other tests to assess a person's overall health and nutritional status if they have signs and symptoms of substantial malnutrition or dietary malabsorption. People with alcoholism, liver disease, stomach cancer, or malabsorption diseases including celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or cystic fibrosis may fall into this category. 

Testing may be performed to assess the success of treatment in patients with known B12 and folate deficits. This is especially true for people who cannot absorb B12 and/or folate effectively and must be treated for the rest of their lives. 

Folate levels in the blood's serum might fluctuate depending on a person's recent diet. Because red blood cells contain 95 percent of circulating folate, a test to evaluate folate levels inside RBCs could be employed instead of or in addition to the serum test. Some doctors believe that the RBC folate test is a better predictor of long-term folate status and is more clinically useful than serum folate, however there is no consensus on this. 

Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are two more laboratory tests that can be used to detect B12 and folate deficits. In B12 deficiency, both homocysteine and MMA are high, whereas in folate deficit, only homocysteine, not MMA, is elevated. This distinction is critical because treating anemia with folate treats the anemia but not the brain damage, which may be irreparable. 

What do my Vitamin B12 test results mean? 

Normal B12 and folate levels may indicate that a person does not suffer from a deficiency and that the signs and symptoms they are experiencing?are caused by something else. Normal levels, on the other hand, may indicate that a person's stored B12 and/or folate has not yet been depleted. 

A health practitioner may order a methylmalonic acid test as an early sign of B12 deficiency if a B12 level is normal but a deficiency is still suspected. 

A low B12 and/or folate level in a person with signs and symptoms implies a deficiency, although it does not always indicate the severity of the anemia or related neuropathy. Additional tests are frequently performed to determine the source of the deficit. Low B12 or folate levels can be caused by a variety of factors. 

Dietary folate or B12 deficiency, which?is uncommon in the United States. It can be evident in people who are malnourished in general and vegans who do not eat any animal products. Folate deficiency has become extremely rare since the development of fortified cereals, breads, and other grain products. 

Both B12 and folate deficits can be caused by diseases that prevent them from being absorbed in the small intestine. These may include the following: 

  • Pernicious anemia 
  • Celiac disease 
  • Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are examples of inflammatory bowel disease. 
  • Bacterial overgrowth or the presence of parasites in the intestines, such as tapeworms 
  • Long-term usage of antacids or H2 proton pump inhibitors reduces stomach acid production. 
  • Absorption can be considerably reduced by surgery that removes part of the stomach or the intestines, such as gastric bypass. 
  • Insufficiency of the pancreas 
  • Chronic alcoholism or heavy drinking 
  • Some treatments, such as metformin, omeprazole, methotrexate, or anti-seizure medications like phenytoin, are used. 
  • Increased requirements for healthy fetal development, all pregnant women require an increased amount of folate and are advised to consume 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. The need for folate is higher in those who have cancer that has spread or who have chronic hemolytic anemia. 
  • Smoking 

If a person is being treated for a B12 or folate deficit with supplements, normal or higher findings suggest that the treatment is working. 

High amounts of B12 are uncommon, and they aren't routinely evaluated clinically. If a person has a condition such chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm, diabetes, heart failure, obesity, AIDS, or severe liver disease, their vitamin B12 level may be elevated. High B12 levels can also be caused by using estrogens, vitamin C, or vitamin A. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A B12 and Folate test measures the levels of B12 and folic acid in the blood. These results can be used to determine a B12 and/or folate deficiency and evaluate a person's nutritional status. Anemia and Neuropathy can also be evaluated using the results from this test.

Also Known As: Vitamin B12 and Folate test, Cobalamin and Folic Acid Test, Vitamin B12 and Vitamin B9 Test, Vitamin B12 Test, Vitamin B9 Test, Cobalamin Test, Folic Acid Test, Folate Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is Vitamin B12 and Folate panel test ordered?

When a complete blood count and/or blood smear, performed as part of a health checkup or anemia evaluation, reveal a low red blood cell count with the presence of big RBCs, B12 and folate levels may be ordered. A high mean corpuscular volume, in particular, implies that the RBCs are enlarged.

When a person exhibits the following signs and symptoms of a deficit, testing for B12 and folate levels may be necessary.

  • Diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Muscle weakness, fatigue
  • Appetite loss.
  • Skin that is pale
  • Irregular heartbeats, rapid heart rate
  • Breathing problems
  • Tongue and mouth ache
  • In the feet, hands, arms, and legs, there is tingling, numbness, and/or burning 
  • Confusion or obliviousness
  • Paranoia

When a person is at risk of deficiency, such as those with a history of malnutrition or a condition associated to malabsorption, B12 and folate testing may be ordered.

Individuals being treated for malnutrition or a B12 or folate deficit may have these tests done on a frequent basis to see how effective their treatments are. This could be part of a long-term therapy plan for people who have a disease that causes chronic deficiency.

What does a Vitamin B12 and Folate panel blood test check for?

The B complex of vitamins includes vitamins including vitamin B12 and folate. They are required for the creation of normal red blood cells, tissue and cell repair, and the synthesis of DNA, the genetic material in cells. Both are nutrients that the body cannot make and must be obtained from the diet.

Vitamin B12 and folate tests diagnose vitamin deficiencies by measuring vitamin levels in the liquid section of the blood. The amount of folate in red blood cells is sometimes tested as well.

Folate is a naturally occurring form of the vitamin, whereas folic acid is a supplement that can be added to foods and beverages. Leafy green vegetables, dry beans and peas, citrus fruits, yeast, and liver all contain it. Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, can be found in animal-based foods such red meat, fish, poultry, milk, yogurt, and eggs. Fortified cereals, breads, and other grain products have become key sources of B12 and folate in recent years.

A lack of B12 or folate can cause macrocytic anemia, a condition in which red blood cells are bigger than normal. Megaloblastic anemia is a kind of macrocytic anemia marked by the generation of fewer but larger RBCs known as macrocytes, as well as cellular abnormalities in the bone marrow. Reduced white blood cell and platelet counts are two more test results linked to megaloblastic anemia.

B12 is also necessary for nerve function, and a lack of it can induce neuropathy, which causes tingling and numbness in the hands and feet of those who are affected.

Folate is required for cell division, which occurs in the developing fetus. In a growing fetus, a lack of folate during early pregnancy can raise the chance of neural tube abnormalities such spina bifida.

B12 and folate deficiency is most commonly caused by not getting enough of the vitamins through diet or supplements, poor absorption, or increased requirement, as observed during pregnancy:

  • Dietary deficiencies are uncommon in the United States since many meals and beverages are fortified with vitamins that the body stores. Adults normally have many years' worth of vitamin B12 and around three months' worth of folate stored in their liver. Dietary deficiencies normally do not manifest symptoms until the body's vitamin supplies have been exhausted. Vegans and their breast-fed infants can suffer from B12 deficiency.
  • Inadequate absorption—the absorption of vitamin B12 is a multi-step process. B12 is normally released from food by stomach acid and then bound to intrinsic factor, a protein produced by parietal cells in the stomach, in the small intestine. After being absorbed by the small intestine and bound by carrier proteins, the B12-IF complex reaches the blood. B12 absorption is hampered if any of these processes are disrupted by a disease or condition.
  • Increased demand—this can occur as a result of a range of diseases and disorders. When a woman is pregnant or nursing, in early childhood, with malignancies, or with chronic hemolytic anemias, there is an increased demand for folate.

Lab tests often ordered with a Vitamin B12 and Folate panel test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Methylmalonic Acid
  • Homocysteine
  • Vitamin B1
  • Vitamin B3
  • Vitamin B5
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B7
  • Intrinsic Factor Antibody
  • Parietal Cell Antibody
  • Reticulocyte Count

Conditions where a Vitamin B12 and Folate panel test is recommended:

  • Neural Tube Defects
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiencies
  • Anemia
  • Alcoholism
  • Malnutrition
  • Celiac Disease
  • Malabsorption
  • Neuropathy
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease

How does my health care provider use a Vitamin B12 and Folate panel test?

Separate tests for vitamin B12 and folate are frequently used in conjunction to detect deficiencies and to aid in the diagnosis of anemias such as pernicious anemia, an inflammatory condition that inhibits B12 absorption.

B12 and folate are two vitamins that the body cannot generate and must be obtained from the diet. They're needed for red blood cell creation, tissue and cell repair, and DNA synthesis, which is the genetic material in cells. B12 is required for normal nerve function.

B12 and folate tests can also be used to assess someone who is experiencing mental or behavioral changes, especially in the elderly. A B12 test can be ordered with or without folate, as well as with other screening laboratory tests like a complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, antinuclear antibody, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor, to help determine why a person is exhibiting signs and symptoms of a nerve disorder.

B12 and folate tests can also be performed in conjunction with a variety of other tests to assess a person's overall health and nutritional status if they have signs and symptoms of substantial malnutrition or dietary malabsorption. People with alcoholism, liver disease, stomach cancer, or malabsorption diseases including celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, or cystic fibrosis may fall into this category.

Testing may be performed to assess the success of treatment in patients with known B12 and folate deficits. This is especially true for people who cannot absorb B12 and/or folate effectively and must be treated for the rest of their lives.

Folate levels in the blood's liquid part might fluctuate depending on a person's recent diet. Because red blood cells contain 95 percent of circulating folate, a test to evaluate folate levels inside RBCs could be employed instead of or in addition to the serum test. Some doctors believe that the RBC folate test is a better predictor of long-term folate status and is more clinically useful than serum folate, however there is no consensus on this.

Homocysteine and methylmalonic acid are two more laboratory tests that can be used to detect B12 and folate deficits. In B12 deficiency, both homocysteine and MMA are high, whereas in folate deficit, only homocysteine, not MMA, is elevated. This distinction is critical because treating anemia with folate treats the anemia but not the brain damage, which may be irreparable.

What do my Vitamin B12 and Folate test results mean?

Normal B12 and folate levels may indicate that a person does not suffer from a deficiency and that the signs and symptoms are caused by something else. Normal levels, on the other hand, may indicate that a person's stored B12 and/or folate has not yet been depleted.

A health practitioner may request a methylmalonic acid test as an early sign of B12 insufficiency if a B12 level is normal but a deficiency is still suspected.

A low B12 and/or folate level in a person with signs and symptoms implies a deficiency, although it does not always indicate the severity of the anemia or related neuropathy. Additional tests are frequently performed to determine the source of the deficit. Low B12 or folate levels can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

Dietary folate or B12 deficiency is uncommon in the United States. It can be evident in people who are malnourished in general and vegans who do not eat any animal products. Folate deficiency has become extremely rare since the development of fortified cereals, breads, and other grain products.

Both B12 and folate deficits can be caused by diseases that prevent them from being absorbed in the small intestine. These may include the following:

  • Pernicious anemia.
  • Celiac disease
  • Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
  • Bacterial overgrowth or the presence of parasites in the intestines, such as tapeworms
  • Long-term usage of antacids or H2 proton pump inhibitors reduces stomach acid production.
  • Absorption can be considerably reduced by surgery that removes part of the stomach or the intestines, such as gastric bypass.
  • Insufficiency of the pancreas
  • Chronic alcoholism or heavy drinking
  • Some treatments, such as omeprazole, metformin, methotrexate, and/or anti-seizure medications like phenytoin.
  • Increased requirement for healthy fetal development, all pregnant women require an increased amount of folate and are advised to consume 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. People who have cancer that has spread or who have chronic hemolytic anemia require more folate.
  • Smoking

If a person is taking supplements to treat a B12 or folate deficiency, normal or higher findings indicate that the treatment is working.

High amounts of B12 are uncommon, and they aren't routinely evaluated clinically. If a person has a condition such chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm, diabetes, heart failure, obesity, AIDS, or severe liver disease, their vitamin B12 level may be elevated. High B12 levels can also be caused by using estrogens, vitamin C, or vitamin A.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Vitamin B12 Binding Capacity, Unsaturated (Transcobalamin)

Clinical Significance

Vitamin B12 Binding Capacity, Unsaturated (Transcobalamin), binds and transports vitamin B12 in the circulation. Increased concentrations are associated with patients with myeloproliferative disorders. Decreased concentrations are seen in individuals with megaloblastic anemia or Transcobalamin deficiency.

Alternative Name(s) 

Transcobalamin, B12 Binding Capacity


Vitamin B2 is involved in metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein. The clinical manifestations of deficiency are non-specific. Clinical manifestations include mucocutaneous lesions of the mouth and skin, corneal vascularization, anemia, and personality changes.

Nicotinic Acid occurs naturally in plants and animals and is also added to many foods as a vitamin supplement.

Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is one of 8 B vitamins. All B vitamins help the body convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which is used to produce energy. These B vitamins, often referred to as B complex vitamins, also help the body use fats and protein. B complex vitamins are needed for healthy skin, hair, eyes, and liver. They also help the nervous system function properly.Source: Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid)


Vitamin B6 is a cofactor in many metabolic pathways including heme synthesis. Vitamin B6 deficiency may be observed in patients with metabolic disorders, secondary to therapeutic drug use, or alcoholism. Deficiency affects the function of the immune system.

Vitamin C is an antioxidant involved in connective tissue metabolism, drug-metabolizing systems, and mixed-function oxidase systems to list a few. Vitamin C deficiency causes scurvy; manifestations include impaired formation of mature connective tissue, bleeding into the skin, weakness, fatigue, and depression.


When we were kids, our elders often told us to take our vitamins, but this advice is equally important for managing the health of adults. The latest data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey has the following to say: 

  • More than 10% of Americans, 30 million of them, have a vitamin deficiency 
  • Vitamin B6 deficiency affects 32% of adults 
  • Vitamin D deficiency affects 95% 
  • A magnesium deficiency affects 61% 

If you want to maintain your bodily health, it is essential that you go in for a vitamin and mineral test.  

It does not mean you need to pay for a costly visit to the doctor for a prescription. The services we render are fast, secure, and easy for you to get your results. 

Tests for vitamins are simple, but the challenge is to know which test you need to undertake and why. Our vitamin test guide can help you make an informed choice when picking which test or panel to order. Let's start by learning about vitamins and minerals. 

Vitamin and Mineral Tests: What are they? 

A healthy diet is one that will give you a balanced intake of both vitamins and minerals, or if you have dietary restrictions, you may need supplements. The following are the vitamins and minerals that you need: 

  • Vitamins: A, C, D, E, and K 
  • B vitamins: B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, and B12 
  • Minerals: Magnesium, calcium, folate, iron, and zinc 

A sample of your blood will be used in vitamin and mineral tests so that the levels of all these minerals and vitamins can be determined. With Ulta Lab Tests, you can visit an authorized patient service center so that a phlebotomist can draw your blood, which will then be forwarded to a national laboratory for the needed tests. 

The testing begins as soon as the specimen comes to the lab, and the results will be posted in your online patient portal within a few days once the lab completes the tests. 

Benefits of this Testing 

Vitamins and minerals play a large part in our bodily functions, right from maintaining bone density to the functioning of the brain. They can also affect chronic diseases and other health conditions such as: 

  • Osteoporosis 
  • Hypertension 
  • Diabetes 
  • Heart disease 
  • Anemia 
  • Autoimmune disease 
  • Bone loss 
  • Depression 

Most people, in general, never monitor their intake of minerals and vitamins. Testing for vitamins and minerals can reveal whether you have a deficiency or are in danger of developing one. 

A deficiency in vitamins can often be an early warning sign that you will develop health issues that can become serious. Catch it early, and you can avoid conditions like anemia and diabetes. It's best to catch early signs and prevent diseases than to treat them later. 

Both in the U.S. and the rest of the world, heart disease has become the number one cause of death. You can mitigate these risk factors if you have a healthy intake of essential vitamins and minerals. 

Vitamins and Mineral Tests you can order

Ulta Lab Tests offer four test panels for vitamins and minerals: 

·      Vitamins and Minerals - Basic 

·      Vitamins and Minerals - Basic Plus 

·      Vitamins and Minerals - Advanced 

·      Vitamins and Minerals- Comprehensive 

The Vitamins and Minerals - Basic panel includes four tests and six biomarkers. This panel can detect anemia with the iron and ferritin markers included in it. It also checks for folate and magnesium levels 

The Vitamins and Minerals - Basic Plus panel comes with eight tests and 13 biomarkers. Besides testing for anemia, this panel includes tests for prealbumin, Vitamin D, and Vitamin B12, which can screen for a broader range of illnesses.

The Vitamins and Minerals - Advanced panel comes with 22 tests and 115 biomarkers. This panel tests for multiple deficiencies and includes a urinalysis test that will check for infections and kidney and urinary health. 

The Vitamins and Minerals- Comprehensive panel, conducts 24 tests and 34 biomarkers, testing for a full range of more than twenty vitamins and minerals that are deemed essential. 

Your doctor will determine whether you need just a basic panel or have to order something more comprehensive. 

FAQ About Vitamin tests 

It is very easy to have a mineral and vitamin test done, and it can get you many benefits. It will allow you to take active control of matters regarding your health and also ensure that you are taking the right nutrition so that health issues can be prevented from developing. 

Even if you don't have any dietary restrictions and take plenty of supplements, vitamins, and minerals, tests can reveal deficiencies you were not aware of.

How Can a Vitamin Test Help? 

Most Americans' diets are high in salt, sugar, and fat and are not of very high nutritional value. 

Our culture is workaholic and fast-paced. It is quite normal to go in for fast food. Millions of Americans live in what can be called a food desert where there is no access to healthy food. 

A person can have developmental and health problems that do not directly point to a deficiency. The symptoms can also point to a health issue that you are already aware of. 

For example, depression is correlated with a deficiency in Vitamin D, but the symptoms like body aches and fatigue are the same. To know the underlying cause of these symptoms, a vitamin test is required. 

Vitamin deficiencies can cause other symptoms, such as: 

  • Shifts in moods 
  • Changes in personality 
  • Inability to sleep or insomnia 
  • Muscle cramps and weakness 
  • Lightheadedness and dizziness 
  • Becoming short of breath 
  • Upset digestion and nausea 

You may have access to plenty of food, but it may not be the best for vitamin intake. Vitamin deficiencies can develop even in countries that have low levels of food insecurity. 

The most prevalent deficiency is Vitamin D, and that is why testing for just Vitamin D can benefit most adults. 

What must you do if your tests reveal a deficiency? Fortunately, when your vitamin and mineral level results are low, they are easy to correct. 

Minor adjustments will have to be made to your diet, or you will need to take supplements of vitamins and minerals. Your doctor may even prescribe prescription supplements. Repeat testing in a few months will reveal the impact dietary changes and supplements made on your vitamins and minerals levels. 

If the deficiency points to serious health issues, the test for vitamins and minerals will also indicate any further tests that are specifically needed. Your intake can be healthy, but if the vitamins are not absorbed, it is an indication of a potential malabsorption problem. 

Diseases like Chron's disease or celiac disease can affect the absorption of Vitamin B12. It is necessary to understand your test results and what they indicate about your health. 

Benefits of Vitamins and Minerals tests from Ulta Lab Tests 

The tests offered by Ulta Lab Tests are very accurate and reliable so that you can make informed decisions about your nutritional health. There are many things that you will find about Ulta Lab Tests that you will like, such as: 

  • Results that are secure and confidential 
  • No health insurance is needed 
  • No physician's referrals required
  • Affordable prices
  • Guaranteed 100% satisfaction 

Order your vitamin and mineral tests to take control of your nutritional health. You will receive your results in your private online patient portal in 24 to 48 hours for most tests and 5-7 days for tests that are complicated.

Take charge of your health today with Ulta Lab Tests.