Reproductive Hormone Tests (Pregnancy & Fertility)

Reproductive Hormone Testing and health information

Our reproductive hormone blood test checks the levels of your reproductive hormones to determine if they are out of balance.

Are you concerned about reproductive hormones imbalance? Read below to find out about the benefits of reproductive hormone lab tests!


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Are you looking to get a better understanding of your reproductive health? 

The Reproductive Hormones - Comprehensive lab panel is a great way to keep track of your reproductive health. This panel contains 9 tests with 10 biomarkers, so you can be sure you're getting the most accurate information possible. The panel includes tests for 17-hydroxyprogesterone, DHEA sulfate, estradiol, estrogen, FSH, LH, progesterone, testosterone, and sex hormone binding globulin. With this comprehensive panel, you can rest assured that you are taking the best possible care of your reproductive health.

This information can help you, and your doctor understand your fertility, hormonal balance, and overall reproductive health. With this information, you can make informed decisions about your reproductive health and fertility.

What is included in the Reproductive Hormones - Comprehensive Lab Panel?

The Reproductive Hormones - Comprehensive Lab Panel, includes 9 tests with 10 biomarkers. The panel includes tests for

  • 17-Hydroxyprogesterone
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Estrogen, Total, Serum
  • FSH
  • LH
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • Testosterone, Total and Free
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin

What is a reproductive hormone?

A reproductive hormone is any hormone that regulates or influences the reproductive system. The reproductive system is made up of the organs and hormones that produce, transport, and sustain gametes (sex cells) and support the development of offspring.

What are the benefits of testing for reproductive hormones?

There are many benefits to testing for reproductive hormones. This information can help you, and your doctor understand your fertility, hormonal balance, and overall reproductive health. With this information, you can make informed decisions about your reproductive health and fertility.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212 which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212 which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.


This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212 which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.



Description: 17-hydroxyprogesterone is a test that is measuring the levels of 17-OHP in the blood. 17-OHP is used to detect and monitor the treatment processes for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

Also Known As: 17-OHP Test, 17-OH Progesterone Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a 17-Hydroxyprogesterone test ordered?

The 17-OHP test is regularly ordered as part of a newborn screening and may be repeated if the screening test results are elevated to confirm the initial findings.

When an infant or young kid exhibits signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency or CAH, a 17-OHP test may be administered.

When the milder type of CAH is suspected, this test may be ordered in older children or adults. When a girl or woman is having symptoms that could be caused by CAH or another illness, such as PCOS, the 17-OHP test can be used.

Boys and men may be tested if they are experiencing early puberty or infertility.

When a person is diagnosed with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, a 17-OHP test may be ordered on a regular basis to assess treatment effectiveness.

What does a 17-Hydroxyprogesterone blood test check for?

17-hydroxyprogesterone is a steroid hormone that is created during the cortisol production process. This test detects and/or evaluates congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a hereditary disorder characterized by decreased adrenal cortisol and aldosterone production and increased male sex hormone production.

Cholesterol is the source of 17-OHP. It is a precursor of active steroid hormones, rather than an active steroid hormone.

Cortisol is a hormone produced by the adrenal glands that aids in the breakdown of protein, carbohydrates, and fats, regulates the immune system, and maintains blood pressure. Other steroid hormones produced by the adrenal glands include aldosterone, which helps regulate salt levels and blood pressure, and androgens, which, like testosterone, cause male sexual characteristics and other consequences.

The processes in the synthesis of cortisol necessitate the use of several enzymes. Inadequate levels of cortisol are produced when one or more of these enzymes are insufficient or malfunctioning, as is the case with CAH. CAH is caused by a partial or total loss of the enzyme 21-hydroxylase, which accounts for around 90% of cases.

The adrenal gland grows in size because a low level of cortisol induces an increase in the level of a specific pituitary hormone that drives adrenal growth and hormone production. The increased size and activity, however, are insufficient to overcome the cortisol production bottleneck. Other chemicals that do not require the faulty enzyme, such as 17-hydroxyprogesterone and androgens, are created in excess. This is why 17-OHP testing can aid in the detection of CAH.

CAH is a set of hereditary illnesses characterized by cortisol-related enzyme deficits and caused by particular gene mutations. A mutation in the 21-hydroxylase gene causes around 90% of CAH cases, which can be diagnosed by an increase in 17-OHP in the blood. When both genes, one from each parent, contain mutations that reduce or cease the activity of the enzyme for which the gene codes, the disease is caused. Parents could be carriers, and carriers could not show any symptoms.

CAH with 21-hydroxylase deficiency can be inherited in two forms: severe and mild.

Severe forms can result in kids being born with severe aldosterone and cortisol deficits, necessitating medical treatment. This severe variant is most commonly found in infancy or early childhood through regular newborn screening. It may manifest in early childhood with signs and symptoms such as vomiting, listlessness, lack of energy, not eating properly, failure to thrive, dehydration, and low blood pressure if it is not found through screening, especially with severe sickness.

Excess male sex hormones can cause the development of male characteristics in females. Female babies' sex organs may not be obviously male or female, making it difficult to tell their gender at first. During childhood and adolescence, females may have excessive hair development on the face and body, as well as other male secondary sexual traits such as irregular menstruation. Men with this disorder may not appear different at birth, but they might develop sexual traits early in life, putting them at risk for fertility problems later in life.

Only partial lack of the enzyme may be present in the milder, though more prevalent type of CAH caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency. This kind of CAH, also known as late-onset or non-classical CAH, can manifest symptoms at any age during childhood, adolescence, or adulthood. Symptoms might be nonspecific, develop slowly over time, and differ from one person to the next. Though this type of CAH is rarely life-threatening, it can cause growth, development, and puberty issues in children, as well as infertility in adults.

Lab tests often ordered with a 17-Hydroxyprogesterone test:

  • Cortisol
  • ACTH
  • Testosterone
  • Androstenedione
  • Pregnenolone

Conditions where a 17-Hydroxyprogesterone test is recommended:

  • Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia
  • Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Addison Disease
  • Endocrine Syndromes
  • Infertility

How does my health care provider use a 17-Hydroxyprogesterone test?

The 17-hydroxyprogesterone test is used to detect congenital adrenal hyperplasia and can be used in the conjunction with other tests to diagnose and track CAH.

In the United States, the 17-OHP test is frequently ordered as part of newborn screening to detect CAH caused by a lack of 21-hydroxylase.

The 17-OHP test can be used to screen for CAH in older children and adults before symptoms develop, or to confirm a CAH diagnosis in persons who are already experiencing symptoms.

Diagnosis

The presence of 17-OHP in the blood can help doctors diagnose CAH in older children and people who have a milder, "late-onset" variant of the disease.

A 17-OHP test, along with plasma renin activity, androstenedione, and testosterone assays, may be used to evaluate the success of treatment if someone is diagnosed with 21-hydroxylase insufficiency.

In women with symptoms such as abundant face and body hair and irregular periods, a 17-OHP test, along with other hormone testing, may be done to help rule out CAH. Women with probable polycystic ovarian syndrome and infertility, as well as those with suspected adrenal or ovarian malignancies, fall under this category.

False-positive results have been reported with 17-OHP testing, particularly the newborn screening test. Other tests may be performed if the level is higher but not to the point where it is indicative of CAH.

As a follow-up test, an ACTH test may be ordered. ACTH stimulation causes a significant increase in 17-OHP levels in CAH.

CYP21A2 gene mutations that cause the disorder may be detected by genetic testing.

A karyotype test may be ordered as a follow-up test to discover chromosome problems and to assist in determining the gender of a newborn.

Electrolytes may be ordered to determine the sodium and potassium levels of a person.

What do my 17 Hydroxyprogesterone test results mean?

If a newborn or infant has highly elevated 17-OHP levels, he or she is most likely suffering from CAH. If a person's levels are somewhat elevated, he or she may have a milder case of CAH or an 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency.

The absence of CAH due to a 21-hydroxylase deficit is most often shown by normal 17-OHP findings.

In a person with CAH, low or declining amounts suggest a positive response to treatment. High or rising levels may suggest that treatment has to be changed.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: ACTH is a blood test that measures the amount of the adrenocorticotropic hormone in the body’s system. The results can be used to help diagnose or monitor a hormone imbalance or a specific condition or disease related to the pituitary gland.

Also Known As: Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Test, Corticotropin Test, Cosyntropin Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Plasma

Test Preparation: Collect specimen between 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. If drawn at any other time, the reference ranges do not apply

When is an ACTH test ordered?

When a cortisol test reveals aberrant results or when someone has indications or symptoms of excess or inadequate cortisol, an ACTH test may be recommended.

Cortisol excess can induce the following symptoms:

  • Obesity
  • Fat between the shoulders
  • Red, rounded face
  • Skin that is fragile and thin
  • Purple lines on the abdomen
  • Muscle loss
  • Acne
  • Skin problems
  • Excessive body hair
  • Fatigue

High blood pressure, low potassium, high bicarbonate, high glucose levels, and occasionally diabetes are all common with these symptoms.

People with low cortisol levels may have symptoms such as:

  • Muscle wasting
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of weight
  • Skin pigmentation increases, even in places not exposed to the sun
  • Appetite loss
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
  • Dizziness
  • Cravings for salt

Low blood pressure, low blood glucose, low sodium, high potassium, and high calcium are frequently found in conjunction with these symptoms.

Several of the following symptoms are commonly associated with hypopituitarism:

  • Appetite loss
  • Fatigue
  • Menstrual cycle irregularity
  • Sexual organ dysfunction
  • Reduced sexual desire
  • Urination during the night
  • Unprecedented weight loss
  • Hot flashes
  • sensitivity to cold

When a pituitary tumor causes symptoms, the affected person may also experience symptoms related to the compression of adjacent cells and nerves. The tumor, for example, can modify the pattern of headaches. It can also impair the nerves that control vision, creating symptoms like "tunnel vision," localized visual loss, or "double vision."

What does an ACTH blood test check for?

Adrenocorticotropic hormone is a hormone that promotes cortisol production. Cortisol is a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal glands that regulates glucose, protein, and lipid metabolism, suppresses the immune system's reaction, and aids in blood pressure regulation. This test determines how much ACTH is present in the blood.

The pituitary gland is responsible for producing ACTH. The pituitary gland is a network of glands that work together to create hormones that operate on organs, tissues, and other glands to govern systems throughout the body. It is located below the brain in the center of the head.

ACTH levels rise when cortisol levels are low and fall when cortisol levels are high. The hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone in response to a drop in blood cortisol levels. This causes the pituitary gland to produce ACTH, which in turn stimulates the adrenal glands, which are small organs at the top of each kidney, to produce cortisol. The brain, pituitary, and adrenal glands must all be operating properly in order to produce enough levels of cortisol.

Conditions affecting the hypothalamus, pituitary, or adrenal glands can disrupt the regulation of ACTH and cortisol production, causing the glands to generate more or less of the hormones. This can result in signs and symptoms linked with cortisol excess or insufficiency. Cushing disease, Addison disease, and hypopituitarism are all conditions that impact ACTH. Some tumors outside of the pituitary, such as those in the lungs, can also produce ACTH, which raises cortisol levels.

Lab tests often ordered with an ACTH test:

  • Cortisol
  • Cortrosyn Stimulation test
  • Dexamethasone Suppression Test
  • Androstenedione

Conditions where an ACTH test is recommended:

  • Addison Disease
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Cushing Syndrome
  • Endocrine Syndromes

How does my health care provider use an ACTH test?

ACTH blood tests are used to detect, diagnose, and monitor problems related with excessive or deficient cortisol in the body, usually in conjunction with cortisol tests. These circumstances include:

  • Cushing disease is characterized by high cortisol levels caused by an ACTH-producing tumor in the pituitary gland.
  • Cushing syndrome refers to the symptoms and signs of high cortisol levels; it can be caused by an adrenal tumor, adrenal hyperplasia, steroid use, or an ACTH-producing tumor outside the pituitary, such as in the lungs.
  • Cortisol production is reduced in Addison disease due to adrenal gland injury.
  • Secondary adrenal insufficiency: pituitary dysfunction causes decreased cortisol production.
  • Hypopituitarism is pituitary dysfunction or injury that causes the pituitary to produce less hormones, notably ACTH.

Because the level of ACTH generally varies in the opposite direction of the level of cortisol, measuring both can assist distinguish between some of these diseases.

If abnormal levels are found, a healthcare professional will do additional testing to confirm the results and discover the cause.

What do my ACTH test results mean?

The interpretation of the results can be difficult in many circumstances. ACTH and cortisol levels fluctuate throughout the day. ACTH levels are normally highest in the morning and lowest at night. It will increase cortisol production, which will follow the same daily rhythm as ACTH but rise later in the day and fall later in the evening. This diurnal rhythm is frequently disrupted by conditions that influence ACTH and cortisol synthesis.

ACTH and cortisol patterns associated with various illnesses of the adrenal and pituitary glands.

An adrenal tumor, steroid treatment, or hypopituitarism can all cause a reduction in ACTH.

Cushing disease and ectopic ACTH cannot be reliably distinguished from cortisol and ACTH measurements alone. Other tests are also performed to aid healthcare providers in determining this distinction. When some medications are given to promote or repress hormone synthesis, testing the change in cortisol levels might assist the healthcare practitioner establish the correct diagnosis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Determination of aldosterone is useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of primary aldosteronism, selective hypoaldosteronism, edematous states, and other conditions of electrolyte imbalance

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Description: Aldosterone is a blood test often ordered to test patients with low potassium or high blood pressure.

Also Known As: Aldosterone Plasma Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Plasma

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Aldosterone test ordered?

When someone has high blood pressure, a blood aldosterone test is generally requested, especially if the person also has low potassium. Even if potassium levels are within normal limits, testing may be necessary if hypertension develops at a young age or if standard drugs fail to control high blood pressure. Because primary aldosteronism is a potentially curable form of hypertension, it’s critical to catch it early and effectively treat it.

When a healthcare practitioner suspects adrenal insufficiency or Addison disease, aldosterone levels, along with additional testing, are occasionally recommended.

What does an Aldosterone blood test check for?

Aldosterone is a hormone that helps to maintain proper sodium and potassium levels in the circulation as well as regulate blood volume and blood pressure.

The adrenal glands, which are positioned on the top and outside portions of each kidney, create aldosterone. Aldosterone increases sodium retention and potassium elimination via the kidneys.

Aldosterone overproduction or underproduction can be caused by a number of factors. Because renin and aldosterone are so closely associated, they’re frequently examined jointly to figure out what’s causing an aberrant aldosterone level.

Lab tests often ordered with an Aldosterone test:

  • Electrolytes
  • Potassium
  • Cortisol
  • Aldosterone
  • Plasma Renin Activity

Conditions where an Aldosterone test is recommended:

  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Addison Disease
  • Hypertension
  • Endocrine Syndromes
  • Conn Syndrome

How does my health care provider use an Aldosterone test?

Aldosterone and renin tests are performed to determine whether the adrenal glands are producing enough aldosterone and to differentiate between potential causes of excess or insufficiency. Aldosterone can be detected in the blood or in a 24-hour urine sample, which determines how much aldosterone is excreted in the urine over the course of a day.

Primary aldosteronism, commonly known as Conn syndrome, is a condition that produces high blood pressure and can be detected with these tests. If the test is positive, stimulation and suppression testing can be used to further examine aldosterone production.

The highest levels of aldosterone are in the morning, and they fluctuate throughout the day. The position of the body, stress, and a number of prescribed medications all have an impact on them.

What do my aldosterone test results mean?

Conn syndrome is characterized by the adrenal glands overproducing aldosterone, which is usually caused by a benign tumor in one of the glands. A high aldosterone level causes increased salt reabsorption and potassium loss by the kidneys, resulting in an electrolyte imbalance. High blood pressure, headaches, and muscle weakness are signs and symptoms, especially if potassium levels are very low.

When someone has hypertension and their blood potassium is lower than usual, it's time to look for aldosteronism. Blood is drawn from both of the adrenal veins and tested to see whether there is a difference in the amount of aldosterone produced by both of the adrenal glands to establish whether only one or both are impacted.

Secondary aldosteronism, which is more prevalent than primary aldosteronism, is caused by anything other than an adrenal gland condition that causes excess aldosterone. Any disorder that restricts blood flow to the kidneys, lowers blood pressure, or lowers sodium levels could cause aldosteronism. Congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis, kidney illness, and pregnancy toxemia can all cause secondary aldosteronism. It's also typical when you're dehydrated. The cause of aldosteronism is usually clear in these circumstances.

The most common cause of secondary aldosteronism is renal artery stenosis, which is a constriction of the blood arteries that supply the kidney. High aldosterone levels produce high blood pressure, which can be treated with surgery or angioplasty. A catheter is introduced via the groin and blood is collected straight from the veins draining the kidney to see if only one kidney is damaged. If one side's result is much higher than the other, this suggests that the artery is narrowed.

Adrenal insufficiency is the most common cause of low aldosterone. Dehydration, low blood pressure, a low salt level in the blood, and a high potassium level are all symptoms. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a disorder in which babies lack an enzyme needed to create cortisol, can reduce aldosterone production in some circumstances.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Aldosterone and Renin tests are blood tests often ordered together to test patients with low potassium or high blood pressure.

Also Known As: Aldosterone Test, Renin Test, Aldosterone and Renin Ratio Test, Aldosterone and Renin Activity Test, PRA Test, Plasma Renin Activity Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Plasma

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Aldosterone and Plasma Renin Activity test ordered?

When someone has high blood pressure, a blood aldosterone test and a renin test are generally requested together, especially if the person also has low potassium. Even if potassium levels are within normal limits, testing may be necessary if standard drugs fail to control high blood pressure or if hypertension develops at a young age. Because primary aldosteronism is a potentially curable form of hypertension, it’s critical to catch it early and effectively treat it.

When a healthcare practitioner suspects adrenal insufficiency or Addison disease, aldosterone levels, along with additional testing, are occasionally recommended. The aldosterone stimulation test, also known as ACTH stimulation, measures aldosterone and cortisol levels to identify whether a person has Addison disease, reduced pituitary function, or a pituitary tumor. After ACTH stimulation, a natural outcome is an increase in cortisol and an increase in aldosterone.

What does an Aldosterone and Plasma Renin Activity blood test check for?

Aldosterone is a hormone that helps to maintain proper sodium and potassium levels in the circulation as well as regulate blood volume and blood pressure. Renin is an enzyme that regulates the production of aldosterone. The levels of aldosterone and renin in the blood and/or the amount of aldosterone in the urine are measured in these tests.

The adrenal glands, which are positioned on the top and outside portions of each kidney, create aldosterone. Aldosterone increases sodium retention and potassium elimination via the kidneys. Renin is a protein generated by the kidneys that regulates the activity of the hormone angiotensin, which stimulates the production of aldosterone by the adrenal glands.

Renin is released by the kidneys when blood pressure drops or the sodium chloride concentration in the tubules of the kidney decreases. Renin breaks down the blood protein angiotensinogen to produce angiotensin I, which is then transformed to angiotensin II by a second enzyme. Angiotensin II constricts blood vessels and increases the synthesis of aldosterone. Overall, this boosts blood pressure while maintaining appropriate salt and potassium levels.

Aldosterone overproduction or underproduction can be caused by a number of factors. Because renin and aldosterone are so closely associated, they’re frequently examined jointly to figure out what’s causing an aberrant aldosterone level.

Lab tests often ordered with an Aldosterone and Plasma Renin Activity test:

  • Electrolytes
  • Potassium
  • Cortisol
  • Aldosterone
  • Plasma Renin Activity

Conditions where an Aldosterone and Plasma Renin Activity test is recommended:

  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Addison Disease
  • Hypertension
  • Endocrine Syndromes
  • Conn Syndrome

How does my health care provider use an Aldosterone and Plasma Renin Activity test?

Aldosterone and renin tests are performed to determine whether the adrenal glands are producing enough aldosterone and to differentiate between potential causes of excess or insufficiency. Aldosterone can be detected in the blood or in a 24-hour urine sample, which determines how much aldosterone is excreted in the urine over the course of a day. Renin is always counted in milligrams per milliliter of blood.

Primary aldosteronism, commonly known as Conn syndrome, is a condition that produces high blood pressure and can be detected with these tests. If the test is positive, stimulation and suppression testing can be used to further examine aldosterone production.

The highest levels of aldosterone and renin are in the morning, and they fluctuate throughout the day. The position of the body, stress, and a number of prescribed medications all have an impact on them.

What do my aldosterone and plasma renin activity test results mean?

Conn syndrome is characterized by the adrenal glands overproducing aldosterone, which is usually caused by a benign tumor in one of the glands. A high aldosterone level causes increased salt reabsorption and potassium loss by the kidneys, resulting in an electrolyte imbalance. High blood pressure, headaches, and muscle weakness are signs and symptoms, especially if potassium levels are very low.

When someone has hypertension and their blood potassium is lower than usual, it's time to look for aldosteronism. Blood is drawn from both of the adrenal veins and tested to see whether there is a difference in the amount of aldosterone produced by both of the adrenal glands to establish whether only one or both are impacted.

Secondary aldosteronism, which is more prevalent than primary aldosteronism, is caused by anything other than an adrenal gland condition that causes excess aldosterone. Any disorder that reduces blood flow to the kidneys, lowers blood pressure, or lowers sodium levels could cause it. Congestive heart failure, liver cirrhosis, kidney illness, and pregnancy toxemia can all cause secondary aldosteronism. It's also typical when you're dehydrated. The cause of aldosteronism is usually clear in these circumstances.

The most common cause of secondary aldosteronism is renal artery stenosis, which is a constriction of the blood arteries that supply the kidney. High renin and aldosterone levels produce high blood pressure, which can be treated with surgery or angioplasty. A catheter is introduced via the groin and blood is collected straight from the veins draining the kidney to see if only one kidney is damaged. If one side's result is much higher than the other, this suggests that the artery is narrowed.

Adrenal insufficiency is the most common cause of low aldosterone. Dehydration, low blood pressure, a low salt level in the blood, and a high potassium level are all symptoms. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, a disorder in which babies lack an enzyme needed to create cortisol, can reduce aldosterone production in some circumstances.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

 


Androstenedione is useful when evaluating patients with androgen excess and managing patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH).


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Description: A cortisol test measures the amount of cortisol in the blood. These levels will start off high in the morning and throughout the say they become lower. At midnight they are typically at their lowest level. Someone who works a night shift or has an irregular sleep schedule may have a different pattern. This test can be used to determine Cushing's or Addison's Disease.

Also Known As: Cortisol AM Test, Cortisol Total Test, Cortisol Test, Cortisol Blood Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Specimen must be drawn between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. Test is not recommended for patients receiving prednisone/prednisolone therapy due to cross reactivity with the antibody used in this test.

When is a Cortisol AM test ordered?

When a person has symptoms that point to a high level of cortisol and Cushing syndrome, a cortisol test may be recommended.

Women with irregular menstrual periods and increased facial hair may be tested, and children with delayed development and small stature may also be tested.

When someone exhibits symptoms that point to a low cortisol level, adrenal insufficiency, or Addison disease, this test may be ordered.

What does a Cortisol AM blood test check for?

Cortisol is a hormone that plays a function in protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. It has an effect on blood glucose levels, blood pressure, and immune system regulation. Only a small fraction of cortisol in the blood is "free" and biologically active; the majority is attached to a protein. Cortisol is a hormone that is produced into the urine and found in the saliva. This test determines how much cortisol is present in the blood, urine, or saliva.

Cortisol levels in the blood usually rise and fall in a pattern known as "diurnal variation." It reaches its highest point early in the morning, then gradually decreases over the day, reaching its lowest point around midnight. When a person works irregular shifts and sleeps at different times of the day, this rhythm might fluctuate, and it can be disrupted when a disease or condition inhibits or stimulates cortisol production.

The adrenal glands, two triangle organs that sit on top of the kidneys, generate and emit cortisol. The hypothalamus in the brain and the pituitary gland, a small organ below the brain, control the hormone's production. The hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone when blood cortisol levels drop, which tells the pituitary gland to create ACTH. The adrenal glands are stimulated by ACTH to generate and release cortisol. A certain amount of cortisol must be produced for normal adrenal, pituitary gland, and brain function.

Cushing syndrome is a collection of signs and symptoms associated with an unusually high cortisol level. Cortisol production may be increased as a result of:

  • Large doses of glucocorticosteroid hormones are given to treat a range of ailments, including autoimmune illness and certain cancers.
  • Tumors that produce ACTH in the pituitary gland and/or other regions of the body.
  • Cortisol production by the adrenal glands is increased as a result of a tumor or abnormal expansion of adrenal tissues.

Rarely, CRH-producing malignancies in various regions of the body.

Cortisol production may be reduced as a result of:

  • Secondary adrenal insufficiency is caused by an underactive pituitary gland or a pituitary gland tumor that prevents ACTH production.
  • Primary adrenal insufficiency, often known as Addison disease, is characterized by underactive or injured adrenal glands that limit cortisol production.

After quitting glucocorticosteroid hormone medication, especially if it was abruptly stopped after a long time of use.

Lab tests often ordered with a Cortisol AM test:

  • Cortisol PM
  • ACTH
  • Aldosterone
  • 17-Hydroxyprogesterone
  • Growth Hormone

Conditions where a Cortisol AM test is recommended:

  • Addison’s Disease
  • Cushing’s Syndrome
  • Endocrine Syndromes
  • Hypertension
  • Pituitary Disorders

How does my health care provider use a Cortisol AM test?

A cortisol test can be used to detect Cushing syndrome, which is characterized by an excess of cortisol, as well as adrenal insufficiency or Addison disease, which are characterized by a deficiency of cortisol. Among other things, the hormone cortisol controls how proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates are metabolized. Cortisol levels in the blood normally increase and fall in a "diurnal variation" pattern, rising early in the morning, dropping during the day, and reaching their lowest point around midnight.

The adrenal glands generate and excrete cortisol. The hypothalamus in the brain and the pituitary gland, a small organ below the brain, control the hormone's production. The hypothalamus produces corticotropin-releasing hormone when blood cortisol levels drop, which tells the pituitary gland to create ACTH. Cortisol production and release are triggered by ACTH in the adrenal glands. A certain amount of cortisol must be produced for normal brain, pituitary, and adrenal gland function.

Only a small fraction of cortisol in the blood is "free" and biologically active; the majority is attached to a protein. Blood cortisol testing assesses both protein-bound and free cortisol, but urine and saliva cortisol testing assesses only free cortisol, which should be in line with blood cortisol levels. Multiple blood and/or saliva cortisol levels collected at various times, such as 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., can be used to assess cortisol levels and diurnal variation. A 24-hour urine cortisol sample will not reveal diurnal variations; instead, it will assess the total quantity of unbound cortisol voided over the course of 24 hours.

If an elevated amount of cortisol is found, a health professional will conduct additional tests to confirm the results and discover the cause.

If a person's blood cortisol level is abnormally high, a doctor may order additional tests to be sure the high cortisol is indeed abnormal. Additional testing could involve monitoring 24-hour urinary cortisol, doing an overnight dexamethasone suppression test, and/or obtaining a salivary sample before sleep to detect cortisol at its lowest level. Urinary cortisol testing necessitates collecting urine over a set length of time, usually 24 hours. Because ACTH is released in pulses by the pituitary gland, this test can assist evaluate whether a raised blood cortisol level is a true rise.

An ACTH stimulation test may be ordered if a health practitioner feels that the adrenal glands are not releasing enough cortisol or if initial blood tests reveal insufficient cortisol production.

The purpose of ACTH stimulation is to compare the levels of cortisol in a person's blood before and after receiving an injection of synthetic ACTH. If the adrenal glands are healthy, the reaction to ACTH stimulation will be an increase in cortisol levels. Low amounts of cortisol will result if they are broken or not functioning properly. To distinguish between adrenal and pituitary insufficiency, a lengthier variant of this test can be used.

What do my Cortisol AM test results mean?

Cortisol levels are typically lowest before bedtime and highest shortly after awakening, though this pattern can be disrupted if a person works rotating shifts and sleeps at various times on separate days.

Excess cortisol and Cushing syndrome are indicated by an increased or normal cortisol level shortly after awakening, as well as a level that does not diminish by bedtime. If the excess cortisol is not suppressed after an overnight dexamethasone suppression test, the 24-hour urine cortisol is elevated, or the late-night salivary cortisol level is elevated, the excess cortisol is likely due to abnormal increased ACTH production by the pituitary or a tumor outside of the pituitary, or abnormal production by the adrenal glands. Additional tests will aid in determining the root of the problem.

If the subject of the examination reacts to an ACTH stimulation test and has insufficient cortisol levels, the issue is most likely brought on by the pituitary's insufficient production of ACTH. The adrenal glands are most likely the source of the issue if the subject does not react to the ACTH stimulation test.

 

An additional test, like as a CT scan, may be used by the medical professional to evaluate the degree of any gland damage once an irregularity has been identified and related to the pituitary gland, the adrenal glands, or another cause.

Important: Patient needs to have the specimen collected between 7 a.m.-9 a.m.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Deoxycorticosterone (DOC) is a weak mineralocorticoid derived from 21-hydroxylation of progesterone in the adrenal cortex.

DHEA is a weakly androgenic steroid that is useful when congenital adrenal hyperplasia is suspected. It is also useful in determining the source of androgens in hyperandrogenic conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome and adrenal tumors.

DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.

Brief Description: DHEA Sulfate is a blood test that is measuring the levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate in the blood. It is often used to diagnose any problems in the adrenal glands such as cancer or a tumor. It can also be used to evaluate the cause of early puberty in young boys and male characteristics or appearance in women.

Also Known As: DHEA-SO4 Test, DHEAS Test, DHES1 Test, Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a DHEA Sulfate test ordered?

When excess androgen production is suspected and/or a health practitioner wants to analyze a person's adrenal gland function, a DHEAS test, along with other hormone testing, may be requested.

It can be assessed when a woman exhibits signs and symptoms of amenorrhea, infertility, and/or virilization. The intensity of these alterations varies, but they may include:

  • A huskier voice
  • Hair on the face or on the body that is excessive
  • Baldness in men
  • Muscularity
  • Acne
  • The Adam's apple has been enlarged
  • Breast size has shrunk

It may also be ordered if a young girl exhibits evidence of virilization or if a female infant's external genitalia are not clearly male or female.

When young males show indicators of premature puberty, such as a deeper voice, pubic hair, muscularity, and an enlarged penis before the age of typical puberty, DHEAS may be evaluated.

What does a DHEA Sulfate blood test check for?

Male sex hormone dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate is found in both men and women. This test determines the amount of DHEAS in your blood.

DHEAS:

  • At puberty, it aids in the development of male secondary sexual traits.
  • Can be transformed into more strong androgens like testosterone and androstenedione by the body.
  • It has the ability to transform into estrogen.

DHEAS is almost entirely produced by the adrenal glands, with minor contributions from a woman's ovaries and a man's testicles.

It's a good indicator of how well the adrenal glands are working. Overproduction of DHEAS can be caused by malignant and non-cancerous adrenal tumors, as well as adrenal hyperplasia. DHEAS can be produced by an ovarian tumor in rare cases.

DHEAS excess:

  • In adult men, it may go unnoticed.
  • In young boys, it can cause early puberty.
  • Menstrual irregularities and the development of masculine physical traits in girls and women, such as excess body and facial hair
  • Can result in a female infant being born with genitals that aren't clearly male or female

Lab tests often ordered with a DHEA Sulfate test:

  • Testosterone
  • ACTH
  • FSH
  • LH
  • Prolactin
  • Estrogen
  • Estradiol
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • 17-Hydroxyprogesterone
  • Androstenedione

Conditions where a DHEA Sulfate test is recommended:

  • PCOS
  • Infertility
  • Endocrine Syndromes
  • Adrenal Insufficiency
  • Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

How does my health care provider use a DHEA Sulfate test?

The dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate test is ordered in conjunction with testosterone and other male hormones assays to:

  • Examine the adrenal glands' performance.
  • Differentiate DHEAS-secreting disorders produced by the adrenal glands from those caused by the testicles or, in rare cases, the ovaries
  • Adrenocortical tumors and adrenal malignancies can be diagnosed with this test.
  • Assist in the diagnosis of congenital and adult-onset adrenal hyperplasia.

DHEAS levels are frequently examined in women, along with other hormones like FSH, LH, prolactin, estrogen, and testosterone, to help diagnose polycystic ovarian syndrome and rule out other reasons of infertility, lack of monthly cycle, and excess facial and body hair.

DHEAS levels, along with other hormones, may be requested to examine and diagnose the cause of young females developing masculine physical traits and young boys developing early puberty.

What do my DHEA-S test results mean?

A normal DHEAS level, together with other normal male hormone levels, suggests that the adrenal gland is working properly. When an adrenal tumor or cancer is present but not secreting hormones, DHEAS may be normal.

A high DHEAS blood level could indicate that the person's symptoms are caused or exacerbated by excessive DHEAS production. An elevated level of DHEAS, on the other hand, is not used to make a diagnosis of any particular condition; rather, it usually signals that further testing is required to determine the source of the hormone imbalance. An adrenocortical tumor, Cushing illness, adrenal cancer, or adrenal hyperplasia, as well as a DHEAS-producing ovarian tumor, can all cause high DHEAS.

DHEAS levels may be high in polycystic ovary syndrome, but they may also be normal, as PCOS is usually associated with ovarian androgen production.

Adrenal insufficiency, adrenal dysfunction, Addison disease, or hypopituitarism, a disorder characterized by low levels of pituitary hormones that govern the generation and secretion of adrenal hormones, can all produce low DHEAS levels.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


DHT is a potent androgen derived from testosterone via 5-alpha-reductase activity. 5-alpha-reductase deficiency results in incompletely virilized males (phenotypic females). This diagnosis is supported by an elevated ratio of testosterone to DHT.


Description: The Erythropoietin test measures levels of the hormone erythropoietin in your blood’s serum and is generally used to identify the cause of anemia.

Also Known As: EPO Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Due to diurnal variation, it is recommended that specimens be collected between 7: 30am and noon

When is an Erythropoietin test ordered?

When a person develops anemia that does not seem to be due to iron deficiency, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, shortened red blood cell lifespan, or heavy bleeding, a test for erythropoietin may be prescribed. It may be requested when the reticulocyte count is either improperly normal or lowered and the RBC count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit are all decreasing.

When a medical professional has reason to believe that renal dysfunction could be connected to a decline in erythropoietin production in a patient with chronic kidney disease, erythropoietin levels may be requested.

When a complete blood count test reveals that a person has an elevated RBC count along with a high hematocrit and hemoglobin, an EPO test may be required.

When a medical professional has a suspicion that a patient has a bone marrow condition such myeloproliferative neoplasms or myelodysplastic syndrome, they may prescribe an EPO test.

What does an Erythropoietin blood test check for?

The hormone called erythropoietin is largely produced by the kidneys. It is essential for the development of red blood cells, which transport oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. Erythropoietin levels in the blood are determined by this test.

When blood oxygen levels are low, the kidneys generate and release erythropoietin into the blood. The transport of EPO to the bone marrow increases the formation of red blood cells. The hormone only lasts a little time before being removed from the body in the urine.

The kidneys' capacity to manufacture erythropoietin and the oxygen saturation level determine how much of it is released. Erythropoietin is produced and released at higher rates until blood oxygen levels return to normal or close to normal levels, at which point production of the hormone declines. This dynamic feedback system is used by the body to maintain a constant blood RBC count and adequate oxygen levels.

However, if a person has damaged kidneys and does not produce enough erythropoietin, too few RBCs are created and the person usually becomes anemic. Similar to this, a person may develop anemia if their bone marrow is unable to respond to the stimulation provided by EPO. Some bone marrow problems and chronic illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis might cause this.

People with illnesses like lung ailments that affect how much oxygen they breathe in may manufacture more EPO to try and make up for the low oxygen level. Both persistent smokers of tobacco and people who reside at high altitudes may have greater levels of EPO.

Too many RBCs may be created if erythropoietin is produced in excess, as is the case with a number of different malignancies as well as some benign or malignant kidney tumors. This can cause the blood to become thicker and occasionally cause high blood pressure, blood clots, heart attacks, or strokes. Rarely, polycythemia is brought on by the bone marrow condition polycythemia vera rather than by an excess of erythropoietin.

Lab tests often ordered with an Erythropoietin test:

  • Red Blood Cell Count
  • Hemoglobin
  • Hematocrit
  • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  • Reticulocyte Count
  • JAK2 Mutation

Conditions where an Erythropoietin test is recommended:

  • Anemia
  • Kidney Disease
  • Bone Marrow Disorders

How does my health care provider use an Erythropoietin test?

The main purpose of an erythropoietin test is to identify the root of anemia. Candidates for erythropoietin replacement therapy can be found with its aid. It may also be used to assess a bone marrow problem or to assist in determining the origin of an excess of red blood cells.

An EPO test is typically requested as a follow-up to aberrant CBC results, such as low RBC count, hemoglobin, or hematocrit levels. These tests identify the existence and degree of anemia and provide the doctor with information about the anemia's most likely cause. To assist identify whether low EPO may be contributing to or escalating the anemia, erythropoietin testing is prescribed.

The test may be prescribed in cases of chronic renal disease to determine whether the kidneys are still capable of producing enough erythropoietin. Erythropoietin replacement therapy may help boost red blood cell synthesis in the bone marrow if the amount of erythropoietin is low.

To help identify whether the extra production of RBCs is caused by an overproduction of erythropoietin or some other cause, an erythropoietin test may occasionally be requested as a follow-up to CBC findings that reveal an increased number of RBCs.

What do my Erythropoietin test results mean?

A person may not be producing enough erythropoietin if they are anemic and their erythropoietin levels are low or normal.

When erythropoietin levels are elevated in an anemic individual, the anemia may be brought on by a vitamin or iron shortage, a bone marrow condition, or both.

It is likely that extra erythropoietin is being created by the kidneys or by other body tissues if a person has too many red blood cells and their erythropoietin levels are elevated. The name for this disorder is secondary polycythemia.

The reason of the polycythemia is probably unrelated to the synthesis of erythropoietin if there is excessive RBC production and erythropoietin levels are normal or low. The name for this disorder is primary polycythemia.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: Estradiol is a blood test that is used to measure the levels of Estradiol in the blood's serum. Estradiol is one of the Estrogen hormones in the body.  Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS #30289 is a more appropriate test for children that have not yet started a menstrual cycle.

Also Known As: E2 Test, Estrogen 2 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Estradiol test ordered?

Tests for estradiol for women may be ordered if:

  • After menopause, a woman may experience symptoms such as abnormal vaginal bleeding or irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
  • When a woman is unable to conceive, a series of estradiol readings taken over the course of her menstrual cycle may be used to track follicle development before using in vitro fertilization procedures
  • A woman is experiencing menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, night sweats, sleeplessness, and/or irregular or absent menstrual cycles.
  • If a menopausal woman is on hormone replacement therapy, her doctor may order estrone levels on a regular basis to check her progress.

Men and young boys may be subjected to estradiol testing if:

  • A boy's puberty is delayed, as evidenced by slow or delayed growth of testicles and penis, as well as a lack of deepening of voice or growth of body hair.
  • Signs of feminization, such as larger breasts.

What does an Estradiol blood test check for?

Estradiol, or E2, is a component of Estrogen that is present in the blood. For women, Estradiol is something that should be produced naturally, and the body produces larger amounts of Estradiol during puberty and it fluctuates throughout the menstrual cycle. Estradiol is most prominent in women of reproductive age. Low levels are common in girls who have not yet had their first menstrual cycle and in women after their reproductive age.

Lab tests often ordered with an Estradiol test:

  • Estrogen, Total, Serum
  • Estriol
  • Estrone
  • Testosterone Free and Total
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • FSH
  • LH
  • Progesterone

Conditions where an Estradiol test is recommended:

  • Infertility
  • Menopause
  • Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome
  • Hormone Imbalance
  • Premature, delayed, or abnormal development of sex organs

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use an Estradiol test?

Estrogen tests are used to detect a deficit or excess of estrogen in a woman, as well as to aid in the diagnosis of a range of illnesses linked to this imbalance. They may also be ordered to monitor the health of the growing fetus and placenta during pregnancy, as well as to help predict the timing of a woman's ovulation. Estrogen testing can be used to detect a hormone excess and its origin in men.

In the case of girls and women

Estradiol testing may be requested for the following reasons:

  • Diagnose early-onset puberty, which occurs when a girl develops secondary sex traits much earlier than anticipated, or late puberty, which occurs when a female develops secondary sex characteristics or begins menstruation later than predicted.
  • Examine menstrual irregularities such as the absence of menstrual periods, infertility, and unusual vaginal bleeding.
  • Evaluate ovary function and look for signs of ovarian failure.
  • Serial measurements of estradiol can be used to track follicle development in the ovary in the days leading up to in vitro fertilization.
  • Keep track of any hormone replacement therapy you're getting to help with your fertility.
  • Keep track of menopausal hormone replacement medication, which is used to treat symptoms caused by estrogen insufficiency.
  • Identify cancers that produce estrogen.
  • As with breast cancer, keep an eye on anti-estrogen therapy.

Boys and men may be subjected to estradiol testing in order to:

  • Assist in the diagnosis of delayed puberty
  • Assist in determining the cause of larger breasts or other feminization indications.
  • Detect an excess of relative estrogen due to a testosterone or androgen deficit.
  • Identify cancers that produce estrogen.

What do my Estradiol test results mean?

Estradiol is one of the three Estrogens that have a large impact on the women's body throughout the menstrual cycle. When these hormones are too high or too low, it could cause irregular bleeding, infertility, complications with menopause, and delayed or premature puberty. Out of range levels can also be indicative of an ovarian condition such as PCOS. It is important to note that these values will fluctuate throughout a woman's cycle. The Estrogen hormones work together and if one is out of range, the others may also be out of range. It is recommended to follow up with a licensed healthcare professional to determine the best treatment if need.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

IMPORTANT - Note this Estradiol test is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute in Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS - #30289 at an additional charge of $34


Estradiol and Testosterone Total contains the following tests.

  • Estradiol
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS

IMPORTANT - Note the Estradiol test included in this panel is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute Estradiol, Free, LC/MS/MS at an additional fee of $290.00



Reproductive hormones do more than just affecting your fertility. These hormones are responsible for causing symptoms such as abnormal hair growth, balding, and mood swings. If you are currently experiencing any of these symptoms, you should consider a reproductive hormone lab test to see your reproductive hormone levels. It helps determine if you need hormone replacement therapy. Whether you plan to conceive soon or not, you should have the right balance of reproductive hormones in your body. Keep reading this article to learn more about how reproductive hormones affect your body and whether it is time for you to get a reproductive hormone test.

Reproductive Hormone Imbalance

An imbalance of reproductive hormones in your body can cause various problems over time. Reproductive hormones include:

Reproductive hormone imbalance differs according to its symptoms and outcomes. Here are four major types of reproductive hormone imbalances and their effect on your bod

  • Menopause symptoms
  • Ovarian insufficiency
  • Low testosterone in men
  • Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Hormonal imbalances affect both men and women. 

Reproductive Hormonal Imbalance - Risk Factor

The actual cause of reproductive hormone imbalance is still not known. Hence, it's difficult to state what kinds of activities put people at a greater risk for developing such a condition. But current research reveals a few trends in people suffering from reproductive hormone imbalances, such as:

  • Being overweight
  • Older age
  • Little to no exercise
  • Poor diet
  • Living in toxic environments
  • High levels of stress

These risks are simply trends in the patient population that suffers from reproductive hormonal imbalances, but they do not determine if someone has a hormonal imbalance. If you think you have a hormonal imbalance, you should talk to your healthcare provider even if any one of these qualities doesn't describe your condition. 

The Causes of Reproductive Hormone Imbalance

There are different types of reproductive hormone imbalances out there. Each imbalance starts with the endocrine system, but the actual causes of the imbalance are mostly unknown. Some researchers believe that reproductive hormone imbalances are autoimmune in nature. But some others think that the individuals' diet and environment have much to do with the condition. It's hard to pinpoint a specific cause for the condition since research is still ongoing. 

Symptoms Of Reproductive Hormone Imbalance

There are multiple symptoms of reproductive hormonal imbalance. The imbalance can result in too much or too little of a reproductive hormone, and the patient's symptoms will reflect the lack or excess of the reproductive hormone that is out of balance. Some patients may have hot flashes, while some may have chills when they suffer from the condition. On the other hand, some patients can be hungry all the time, while others may not be hungry at all. The symptoms depend on which hormone is out of balance.

When the ovaries don't properly develop, it will result in ovarian insufficiency syndrome. This can occur due to the lack of proper endocrine signaling or an autoimmune problem. Due to the fertility problems that result from this syndrome, the condition is also known as premature menopause. The ovaries get damaged due to radiation or chemotherapy. That is why women who go through radiation or chemotherapy treatments cannot conceive after the treatments.

Damaged ovaries cause an imbalance of estrogen and progesterone in the system of the patient. It may lead to a myriad of symptoms, including:

  • Hot flashes
  • Dry eyes
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Night sweats
  • Irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating

Menopause is considered another type of hormonal imbalance, but it's completely normal to go through menopause. Estrogen and progesterone levels in the patient's body will be quite low during menopause. However, hormone replacement therapy will help some patients avoid the symptoms that come with this condition.

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a condition that produces high testosterone levels in the female body. Testosterone is the primary male reproductive hormone. Symptoms of excess amounts of male hormones in a woman's body can include:

  • Infertility
  • Acne
  • Oily Skin
  • Excess body hair
  • Missed or irregular periods
  • Ovarian cysts
  • Large ovaries
  • Male-pattern baldness

The condition can also result in diabetes, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular diseases. Although some experts believe that PCOS is an autoimmune condition of the endocrine system, it still hasn't been proven. 

Symptoms of low testosterone levels in men include:

  • Weakness
  • Infertility
  • Low energy
  • Decreased sex drive
  • Slower metabolism
  • Low bone density

Similar to hormonal imbalances in women, male imbalances should be identified and treated as soon as possible. 

Lab Tests to Diagnose Reproductive Hormone Imbalances

Lab work is important to determine whether you have a hormonal imbalance or not. Luckily, Ulta Lab Tests offers a wide range of lab tests to check if you have a reproductive hormone imbalance. Our lab tests will look at the testosterone, estrogen, progesterone, and other hormone levels in your body. By measuring the levels of hormones in your body, you can see whether or not you have a hormone imbalance. 

If your test results determine that you have a reproductive hormone imbalance, you should talk to your healthcare provider immediately. Your physician will perform an evaluation to determine what could be causing your hormone imbalance and develop an appropriate treatment plan for your condition.

Order your hormone lab tests with Ulta Lab Tests

If you notice signs of reproductive hormone imbalances, you should act fast. Hormone imbalances will become worse when left untreated. Ulta Lab Tests provides highly accurate and reliable lab tests to make informed decisions about your health. Here are some of the reasons why people loving using Ulta Lab Tests:

  • No health insurance required
  • Secure and confidential results
  • Affordable pricing on all tests
  • No need for a physician's referral
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee 
  • Results are available in 24-48 hours for most tests

Take control of your health and well-being by ordering your hormone lab tests from Ulta Lab Tests.