ODX Functional Testing

ODX Functional Lab Testing and health information

Do you want to know more about your blood chemistry and health?

The ODX functional blood chemistry analysis is one of the most comprehensive methods to understand your health.

We offer a variety of tests that can help you understand the health and wellness in your body. Our ODX Functional blood chemistry analysis is one of the most comprehensive ways to get your blood chemistry tested. We offer a variety of ODX lab panels that can help you understand the health and wellness in your body. The ODX lab panels range from comprehensive testing, which includes all major organ systems, to targeted testing for specific concerns. We have it here with our ODX Functional Lab Test panels, no matter what type of test you need!

You’ll get results quickly with our streamlined process and expert staff who are always available to answer any questions or concerns you may have with your order. It’s an affordable, convenient, and easy way to get information about your health that you can use to improve it. You can learn more about what each test measures here.

Get started today by ordering the ODX Functional Lab Test panels right for you from the selections below.

Click here for additional information on ODX Functional Testing.


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The ODX Vital panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • hs-CRP
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid

The ODX Vital Plus panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Ferritin
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • hs-CRP
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid

The ODX Vital panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • hs-CRP
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Max panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Max panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein B
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Ultimate - Female panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein A-1, Cardio IQ™
  • Apolipoprotein B, Cardio IQ™
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Total
  • T3 Uptake
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum
  • VLDL Cholesterol

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Ultimate - Female panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein A-1, Cardio IQ™
  • Apolipoprotein B, Cardio IQ™
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Total
  • T3 Uptake
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum
  • VLDL Cholesterol

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Ultimate - Male panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein A-1, Cardio IQ™
  • Apolipoprotein B, Cardio IQ™
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • PSA Total
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Total
  • T3 Uptake
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum
  • VLDL Cholesterol

This panel contains Cortisol, A.M. #4212, which requires the patient to have their specimen collected between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m.

The ODX Ultimate - Male panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein A-1, Cardio IQ™
  • Apolipoprotein B, Cardio IQ™
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • PSA Total
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Total
  • T3 Uptake
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum
  • VLDL Cholesterol

This panel contains both Cortisol, A.M. #4212 and Cortisol, P.M. #4213, which will require the patient to visit the patient service center twice in one day.

  • First visit between 7 a.m. - 9 a.m. to have Cortisol, A.M. #4212 drawn along with most of the panel
  • Second visit between 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. to have Cortisol, P.M. #4213 drawn.

The ODX Comprehensive panel contains the following tests:

  • Apolipoprotein A-1, Cardio IQ™
  • Apolipoprotein B, Cardio IQ™
  • Bilirubin, Fractionated
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Cortisol, P.M.
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Fructosamine
  • FSH and LH
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Gastrin
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • IGF-I, LC/MS
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Leptin
  • Lipase
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (A)
  • Magnesium
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Pregnenolone, LC/MS/MS
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • Prolactin
  • PSA Total
  • PTH, Intact (without Calcium)
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Total
  • T3 Uptake
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) and Folate Panel, Serum
  • VLDL Cholesterol

The ODX3 Female Panel contains the following tests:

  • Amylase
  • Bilirubin, Direct
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c with eAG
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Total
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • Thyroid Panel
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • VLDL Cholesterol

The ODX3 Female Panel contains the following tests:

  • Amylase
  • Bilirubin, Direct
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Glucose
  • Hemoglobin A1c with eAG
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Total
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • Thyroid Panel
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • VLDL Cholesterol

The ODX3 Male Panel contains the following tests:

  • Amylase
  • Bilirubin, Direct
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Hemoglobin A1c with eAG
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • PSA Total
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sed Rate by Modified Westergren (ESR)
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Total
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • Thyroid Panel
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • VLDL Cholesterol

The ODX3 Male Panel contains the following tests:

  • Amylase
  • Bilirubin, Direct
  • C-Peptide
  • C-Reactive Protein (CRP)
  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Creatine Kinase (CK), Total
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss
  • Folate, Serum
  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT)
  • Hemoglobin A1c with eAG
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Insulin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD)
  • Lipid Panel
  • Magnesium
  • Phosphate (as Phosphorus)
  • Progesterone, Immunoassay
  • PSA Total
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG)
  • T3 Total
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total, LC/MS/MS
  • Thyroid Panel
  • TSH
  • Uric Acid
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • VLDL Cholesterol

Most Popular

Description: Amylase is a blood test that is used to measure the amount of amylase in the blood’s serum. It is used to assess for and detect a pancreatic disorder.

Also Known As: Amy Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Amylase test ordered?

When a person displays symptoms of a pancreatic disease, a blood amylase test may be conducted.

  • Abdominal or back pain that is severe
  • Fever
  • Appetite loss.
  • Nausea

A urine amylase test may be requested in conjunction with or after a blood amylase test. A health practitioner may conduct one or both of these tests on a regular basis to evaluate the success of treatment and see whether amylase levels are increasing or decreasing over time.

What does an Amylase blood test check for?

Amylase is one of numerous pancreatic enzymes that aid in carbohydrate digestion. This test detects the presence of amylase in the blood.

Amylase is produced from the pancreas into the duodenum, the first region of the small intestine, where it aids in the digestion of carbohydrates. Other organs, including the salivary glands, generate it as well.

Amylase is normally found in modest amounts in the blood and urine. Increased levels of amylase are released into the blood when pancreatic cells are harmed, as in pancreatitis, or when the pancreatic duct is obstructed by a gallstone or, in rare situations, a pancreatic tumor. This raises amylase levels in the blood.

Lab tests often ordered with an Amylase test:

  • Lipase
  • Trypsin
  • Trypsinogen

Conditions where an Amylase test is recommended:

  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Pancreatic Diseases
  • Pancreatitis

How does my health care provider use an Amylase test?

An amylase test is used to identify and track acute pancreatitis. It's frequently ordered in conjunction with a lipase test. It can also be used to detect and track chronic pancreatitis and other pancreas-related conditions.

A urine amylase test may be requested as well. Its level will usually correspond to blood amylase concentrations, but the rise and decrease will occur later. A urine creatinine clearance test may be ordered in conjunction with a urine amylase test to determine the ratio of amylase to creatinine filtered by the kidneys. Because poor kidney function might result in a decreased rate of amylase clearance, this ratio is used to assess renal function.

An amylase test on peritoneal fluid may be used to assist diagnose pancreatitis in some instances, such as when there is a buildup of fluid in the abdomen.

Amylase tests are often used to track the progress of pancreatic cancer treatment and after gallstone resection that has resulted in gallbladder attacks.

What do my Amylase test results mean?

A high level of amylase in the blood may suggest the presence of a pancreas problem.

Amylase levels in the blood often rise to 4 to 6 times higher than the highest reference value, also known as the upper limit of normal, in acute pancreatitis. The increase happens within 4 to 8 hours following a pancreas damage and usually lasts until the cause is effectively treated. In a few days, the amylase levels will return to normal.

Amylase levels in chronic pancreatitis are initially fairly increased, although they frequently decline over time as the pancreas deteriorates. Returning to normal levels may not signal that the source of damage has been rectified in this scenario. The size of the amylase rise does not indicate the severity of pancreatic illness.

Amylase levels may also be elevated in persons who have pancreatic duct obstruction or pancreatic cancer.

Urine amylase levels rise in lockstep with blood amylase levels and remain elevated for several days after blood levels have returned to normal.

A high amount of amylase in the peritoneal fluid can indicate acute pancreatitis, but it can also indicate other abdominal problems including a clogged intestine or poor blood supply to the intestines.

A low amylase level in the blood and urine of a person with pancreatitis symptoms could indicate that the amylase-producing cells in the pancreas have been permanently damaged. Reduced levels can also be caused by renal illness or pregnancy toxemia.

Increased blood amylase levels along with normal to low urine amylase levels could indicate the presence of a macroamylase, a harmless compound of amylase and other proteins that builds up in the bloodstream.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Apolipoprotein B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk.

Also Known As: Apo B Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Apolipoprotein B test ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does an Apolipoprotein B blood test check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with an Apolipoprotein B test:

  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where an Apolipoprotein B test is recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use an Apolipoprotein B test?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein B test results mean?

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

Is apoB a heart disease risk factor? 
The markers of particle number, apoB, or LDL particle number were better at predicting the risk of heart disease than LDL-C.

There are two major forms of Apolipoprotein B, B-100 and B-48. B-100, synthesized in the liver, is the major protein in VLDL, IDL, and LDL cholesterol. B-48, synthesized in the intestines, is essential for the assembly and secretion of chylomicrons. Patients with increased concentrations of Apolipoprotein B are at increased risk of atherosclerosis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Measurement of the levels of bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

Description: Bilirubin Fractionated is a blood test that is used to screen for or monitor liver disorders, hemolytic anemia, and neonatal jaundice.

Also Known As: Total Bilirubin Test, TBIL Test, Neonatal Bilirubin Test, Direct Bilirubin Test, Conjugated Bilirubin Test, Indirect Bilirubin Test, Unconjugated Bilirubin Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Bilirubin, Fractionated test ordered?

When someone shows evidence of abnormal liver function, a doctor will usually request a bilirubin test along with other laboratory tests. A bilirubin test may be ordered when a patient:

  • Evidence of jaundice is visible.
  • Has a history of excessive alcohol consumption
  • Has a possible drug toxicity
  • Has been exposed to viruses that cause hepatitis

Other signs and symptoms to look out for include:

  • Urine with a dark amber tint.
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Swelling and/or pain in the abdomen
  • Fatigue and malaise which are common symptoms of chronic liver disease.

In babies with jaundice, measuring and monitoring bilirubin is considered routine medical therapy.

When someone is suspected of hemolytic anemia as a cause of anemia, bilirubin tests may be ordered. In this instance, it's frequently ordered in conjunction with other hemolysis-related tests such a complete blood count, reticulocyte count, haptoglobin, and LDH.

What does a Bilirubin, Fractionated blood test check for?

Bilirubin is an orange-yellow pigment that is largely formed as a byproduct of heme degradation. Heme is a component of hemoglobin, a red blood cell protein. Bilirubin is eventually digested by the liver, which allows it to be excreted from the body. This test assesses a person's liver function or aids in the diagnosis of anemias caused by RBC destruction by measuring the quantity of bilirubin in their blood.

After roughly 120 days in circulation, RBCs generally disintegrate. Heme is transformed to bilirubin as it is released from hemoglobin. Unconjugated bilirubin is another name for this type of bilirubin. Proteins transport unconjugated bilirubin to the liver, where sugars are linked to bilirubin to produce conjugated bilirubin. Conjugated bilirubin enters the bile and travels from the liver to the small intestines, where bacteria break it down further before it is excreted in the stool. As a result, bilirubin breakdown products give stool its distinctive brown hue.

A normal, healthy human produces a tiny quantity of bilirubin each day. The majority of bilirubin comes from damaged or degraded RBCs, with the rest coming from bone marrow or the liver. Small amounts of unconjugated bilirubin are normally discharged into the bloodstream, but there is almost no conjugated bilirubin. Laboratory tests can measure or estimate both types, and a total bilirubin result can be presented as well.

A person may appear jaundiced, with yellowing of the skin and/or whites of the eyes, if the bilirubin level in their blood rises. The pattern of bilirubin test results can provide information to the health care provider about the ailment that may be present. When there is an exceptional quantity of RBC destruction or when the liver is unable to handle bilirubin, unconjugated bilirubin levels may rise. Conversely, conjugated bilirubin levels can rise when the liver can process bilirubin but not transmit the conjugated bilirubin to the bile for elimination; this is most commonly caused by acute hepatitis or bile duct blockage.

In the first few days after birth, increased total and unconjugated bilirubin levels are fairly common in infants. This condition is known as "physiologic jaundice of the newborn," and it develops when the liver of a newborn is not yet mature enough to handle bilirubin. Physiologic jaundice in newborns usually goes away after a few days. RBCs may be damaged in newborn hemolytic illness due to blood incompatibility between the infant and the mother; in these circumstances, treatment may be necessary since large amounts of unconjugated bilirubin might harm the newborn's brain.

Increased total and conjugated bilirubin levels in infants can be caused by biliary atresia, an uncommon but life-threatening congenital disease. To avoid catastrophic liver damage that may necessitate liver transplantation during the first few years of life, this problem must be rapidly recognized and treated, usually with surgery. Despite early surgical therapy, some children may require liver transplants.

Lab tests often ordered with a Bilirubin, Fractionated test:

  • CMP
  • ALT
  • ALP
  • AST
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Complete Blood Count (CBC)
  • Urinalysis
  • GGT
  • Reticulocyte Count

Conditions where a Bilirubin, Fractionated test is recommended:

  • Jaundice
  • Liver Disease
  • Hepatitis
  • Alcoholism
  • Hemolytic Anemia

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a Bilirubin, Fractionated test?

A bilirubin test is used to detect an abnormally high quantity of the substance in the blood. It can be used to figure out what's causing your jaundice and/or diagnose illnesses like liver disease, hemolytic anemia, and bile duct blockage.

Bilirubin is an orange-yellow pigment that is largely formed as a byproduct of heme degradation. Heme is a component of hemoglobin, a red blood cell protein. Bilirubin is eventually digested by the liver, which allows it to be excreted from the body. An increased blood level can be caused by any disorder that speeds up the breakdown of RBCs or impairs the processing and elimination of bilirubin.

Laboratory testing can measure or estimate two types of bilirubin:

Unconjugated bilirubin—unconjugated bilirubin is formed when heme is released from hemoglobin. Proteins transport it to the liver. Small levels of the substance may be found in the blood.

Sugars are attached to bilirubin in the liver, resulting in conjugated bilirubin. It enters the bile and travels from the liver to the small intestines before being excreted in the feces. In normal circumstances, there is no conjugated bilirubin in the blood.

A chemical test is usually done to determine the total bilirubin level first. If the total bilirubin level rises, a second chemical test can be used to detect water-soluble forms of bilirubin, known as "direct" bilirubin. The amount of conjugated bilirubin present can be estimated using the direct bilirubin test. The "indirect" amount of unconjugated bilirubin can be estimated by subtracting the direct bilirubin level from the total bilirubin level. The pattern of bilirubin test results can provide information to the healthcare professional about the ailment that may be present.

Bilirubin is measured in adults and older children to:

  • Diagnose and/or monitor liver and bile duct disorders.
  • Evaluate patients with hemolytic anemia
  • Distinguish between the causes of jaundice in babies.

Only unconjugated bilirubin is raised in both physiologic jaundice and hemolytic illness of the infant.

Damage to the newborn's liver from neonatal hepatitis and biliary atresia will also raise conjugated bilirubin concentrations, which is generally the first indication that one of these less common disorders is present.

Because excessive unconjugated bilirubin harms growing brain cells, it is critical to detect and treat an increased amount of bilirubin in a newborn. Mental retardation, learning and developmental impairments, hearing loss, eye movement disorders, and mortality are all possible outcomes of this damage.

What do my bilirubin test results mean?

In adults and children, increased total bilirubin, primarily unconjugated bilirubin, could be caused by:

  • Hemolytic or pernicious anemia are two types of anemia.
  • Reaction to a transfusion
  • Cirrhosis
  • Gilbert syndrome

When conjugated bilirubin levels are higher than unconjugated bilirubin levels, there is usually a problem with bilirubin removal by the liver cells. This can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

  • Hepatitis caused by a virus
  • Reactions to drugs
  • Alcoholic hepatitis

When the bile ducts are blocked, conjugated bilirubin is raised more than unconjugated bilirubin. This can happen, for example, when:

  • In the bile ducts, there are gallstones.
  • Damaging of the bile ducts due to tumors

Increased bilirubin levels can also be caused by rare hereditary illnesses that involve aberrant bilirubin metabolism, such as Rotor, Dubin-Johnson, and Crigler-Najjar syndromes.

Low bilirubin levels are usually not a cause for worry and are not monitored.

A newborn's high bilirubin level may be transient and diminish within a few days to two weeks. However, if the bilirubin level exceeds a crucial threshold or rises rapidly, the cause must be investigated so that appropriate treatment can be started. Increased bilirubin levels can be caused by the rapid breakdown of red blood cells as a result of:

  • Incompatibility of the mother's blood type with that of her child
  • Infections that are present at birth
  • oxygen deficiency
  • Liver disease

Only unconjugated bilirubin is elevated in most of these disorders. In the rare disorders of biliary atresia and newborn hepatitis, increased conjugated bilirubin is found. To avoid liver damage, biliary atresia necessitates surgical surgery.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Description: A C-peptide test is a test that will measure the amount of C-peptide, a short amino acid chain, in the blood. This test can be used to determine if the beta cells in the pancreas are producing enough insulin. It can also be used to evaluate the reason for low blood glucose.

Also Known As: Insulin C-Peptide Test, Connecting Peptide Insulin Test, Proinsulin C-peptide test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Fasting is required.

When is a C-Peptide test ordered?

When a person is initially diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, C-peptide levels may be ordered as part of a "residual beta cell function" study.

When a person has type 2 diabetes, a health practitioner may request the test on a regular basis to track the state of their beta cells and insulin production over time and assess whether or not insulin injections are needed.

When there is reported acute or recurring low blood glucose and/or excess insulin is suspected, C-peptide levels can be measured.

A C-peptide test may be conducted on a regular basis after a person has been diagnosed with an insulinoma to assess treatment effectiveness and detect tumor recurrence.

When a person's pancreas has been removed or has had pancreas islet cell transplants, C-peptide levels may be tracked over time.

What does a C-Peptide blood test check for?

C-peptide is a chemical made up of a short chain of amino acids that is released into the bloodstream as a byproduct of the pancreas producing insulin. This test determines how much C-peptide is present in a blood or urine sample.

Proinsulin, a physiologically inactive molecule, splits apart in the pancreas, within specialized cells called beta cells, to generate one molecule of C-peptide and one molecule of insulin. Insulin is necessary on a regular basis for the transport of glucose into the body's cells. When insulin is needed and released into the bloodstream in reaction to elevated glucose levels, equal amounts of C-peptide are also released. C-peptide can be used as a measure of insulin production because it is produced at the same rate as insulin.

C-peptide testing, in instance, can be used to assess the body's insulin production and distinguish it from insulin that is not produced by the body but is given as diabetes medication and hence does not generate C-peptide. This test can be done in conjunction with a blood test for insulin.

Lab tests often ordered with a C-Peptide test:

  • Insulin
  • Glucose

Conditions where a C-Peptide test is recommended:

  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease
  • Liver Disease
  • Insulin Resistance
  • Metabolic Syndrome

How does my health care provider use a C-Peptide test?

C-peptide testing can be used for a variety of reasons. When proinsulin breaks into one molecule of C-peptide and one molecule of insulin, C-peptide is created by the beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that allows the body to use glucose as its primary energy source. C-peptide is a helpful measure of insulin production since it is produced at the same rate as insulin.

A C-peptide test is not used to diagnose diabetes; however, when a person is newly diagnosed with diabetes, it may be ordered alone or in conjunction with an insulin level to evaluate how much insulin the pancreas is currently making.

The body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin in type 2 diabetes, so it compensates by manufacturing and releasing more insulin, which can destroy beta cells. Oral medications are commonly used to help type 2 diabetics stimulate their bodies to produce more insulin and/or make their cells more receptive to the insulin that is already produced. Type 2 diabetics may eventually produce very little insulin as a result of beta cell loss, necessitating insulin injections. Because any insulin produced by the body is reflected in the C-peptide level, the C-peptide test can be used to track beta cell activity and capability over time and to assist a health care provider in deciding when to start insulin treatment.

Antibodies to insulin can develop in people on insulin therapy, independent of the source of the insulin. These often interfere with insulin assays, making it difficult to assess endogenous insulin production directly. C-peptide measurement is a good alternative to insulin testing in certain situations.

C-peptide levels can also be utilized in conjunction with insulin and glucose levels to help determine the source of hypoglycemia and track its therapy. Excessive insulin supplementation, alcohol intake, hereditary liver enzyme deficits, liver or kidney illness, or insulinomas can all cause hypoglycemia symptoms.

Insulinomas can be diagnosed with the C-peptide test. These are tumors of the pancreas' islet cells, which can produce excessive levels of insulin and C-peptide, resulting in abrupt hypoglycemia. C-peptide testing can be used to track how well insulinoma treatment is working and to detect recurrence.

A C-peptide test may be performed to help evaluate a person who has been diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, a group of risk factors that includes abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, and elevated blood glucose and/or insulin resistance.

C-peptide levels are occasionally used to verify the effectiveness of treatment and the procedure's sustained success after someone has had his pancreatic removed or has had pancreas islet cell transplants to restore the ability to manufacture insulin.

What do my C-Peptide test results mean?

A high level of C-peptide implies that endogenous insulin synthesis is high. This could be a result of a high blood glucose level brought on by carbohydrate consumption and/or insulin resistance. Insulinomas, low blood potassium, Cushing syndrome, and renal failure are all linked to a high level of C-peptide.

C-peptide levels that are decreasing in someone with an insulinoma suggest a response to treatment when used for monitoring; levels that are increasing may indicate a tumor recurrence when used for monitoring.

A low amount of C-peptide is linked to a reduction in insulin synthesis. This can happen when the beta cells generate insufficient insulin, as in diabetes, or when their production is reduced by exogenous insulin administration.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: The CRP test is used to identify and/or monitor inflammation in patients.

Also Known As: CRP Test, Inflammation test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a C-Reactive Protein test ordered?

When a person's medical history and signs and symptoms indicate that they may have a significant bacterial infection, a CRP test may be recommended. When a newborn displays signs of infection or when a person has sepsis symptoms including fever, chills, and rapid breathing and heart rate, it may be ordered.

It's also commonly requested on a regular basis to check illnesses like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus, and it's routinely repeated to see if medication is working. This is especially effective for inflammation issues because CRP levels decrease as inflammation decreases.

What does a C-Reactive Protein blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. After trauma or a heart attack, with active or uncontrolled autoimmune illnesses, and with acute bacterial infections like sepsis, markedly higher levels are reported. CRP levels can rise by a thousand-fold in response to inflammatory diseases, and their elevation in the blood can occur before pain, fever, or other clinical signs. The test detects inflammation caused by acute situations or monitors disease activity in chronic diseases by measuring the level of CRP in the blood.

The CRP test is not a diagnostic tool, although it can tell a doctor if inflammation is occurring. This information can be combined with other indicators like signs and symptoms, a physical exam, and other tests to establish whether someone has an acute inflammatory disorder or is having a flare-up of a chronic inflammatory disease. The health care provider may next do additional tests and treatment.

This CRP test should not be confused with the hs-CRP test. These are two separate CRP tests, each of which measures a different range of CRP levels in the blood for different purposes.

Lab tests often ordered with a C-Reactive Protein test:

  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • Procalcitonin
  • ANA
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • Complement

Conditions where a C-Reactive Protein test is recommended:

  • Arthritis
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Sepsis
  • Vasculitis
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
  • Meningitis and Encephalitis

Commonly Asked Questions:

How does my health care provider use a C-Reactive Protein test?

A health practitioner uses the C-reactive protein test to diagnose inflammation. CRP is an acute phase reactant, a protein produced by the liver and released into the bloodstream within a few hours following tissue injury, infection, or other inflammatory event. The CRP test is not a diagnostic test for any ailment, but it can be used in conjunction with other tests to determine whether a person has an acute or chronic inflammatory disorder.

CRP, for example, can be used to detect or track substantial inflammation in someone who is suspected of having an acute ailment like:

  • Sepsis is a dangerous bacterial infection.
  • An infection caused by a fungus
  • Inflammation of the pelvis

People with chronic inflammatory diseases can use the CRP test to detect flare-ups and/or see if their medication is working. Here are a few examples:

  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Arthritis, which can take many forms.
  • Autoimmune disorders, examples include lupus and vasculitis

CRP is occasionally requested in conjunction with an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, another inflammatory test. While the CRP test is not specific enough to diagnose an illness, it does serve as a broad marker for infection and inflammation, alerting doctors to the need for more testing and treatment. A variety of additional tests may be used to determine the source of inflammation, depending on the probable cause.

What do my C-Reactive Protein test results mean?

CRP levels in the blood are usually low.

CRP levels in the blood that are high or rising indicate the existence of inflammation, but they don't tell you where it is or what's causing it. A high CRP level can establish the presence of a severe bacterial infection in people who are suspected of having one. High levels of CRP in persons with chronic inflammatory disorders indicate a flare-up or that treatment isn't working.

When the CRP level rises and then falls, it indicates that the inflammation or infection is diminishing and/or responding to treatment.

Is there anything else I should know about C-Reactive Protein?

CRP levels can rise during pregnancy, as well as with the use of birth control tablets or hormone replacement therapy. Obese people have also been found to have higher CRP levels.

In the presence of inflammation, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate test will also rise; however, CRP rises first and then falls faster than the ESR.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A hs-CRP or High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein test is a blood test used to accurately detect lower concentrations of the protein C-Reactive Protein. This test is used to evaluate your risk of cardiovascular and heart disease and to check for inflammation and many other issues.

Also Known As: hsCRP Test, Cardiac CRP Test, high sensitivity C-reactive protein Test, CRP Test for heart disease.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a hs-CRP test ordered?

There is currently no consensus on when to get an hs-CRP test. It may be beneficial for treatment purposes to order hs-CRP for those that have kidney disease, diabetes or inflammatory disorders.

It's possible that hs-CRP will be tested again to confirm that a person has persistently low levels of inflammation.

What does a hs-CRP blood test check for?

C-reactive protein is a protein found in the blood that rises in response to infection and inflammation, as well as after trauma, surgery, or a heart attack. As a result, it's one of numerous proteins referred to as acute phase reactants. The high-sensitivity CRP test detects low levels of inflammation in the blood, which are linked to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease.

According to the American Heart Association, CVD kills more people in the United States each year than any other cause. A number of risk factors have been related to the development of CVD, including family history, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, being overweight or diabetic, however a considerable number of people with few or no recognized risk factors will also acquire CVD. This has prompted researchers to investigate for new risk variables that could be causing CVD or could be used to identify lifestyle modifications and/or treatments that could lower a person's risk.

High-sensitivity CRP is one of an increasing number of cardiac risk markers that may be used to assess an individual's risk. According to certain research, monitoring CRP with a highly sensitive assay can assist identify the risk level for CVD in persons who appear to be healthy. CRP levels at the higher end of the reference range can be measured with this more sensitive test. Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, these normal but slightly elevated levels of CRP in otherwise healthy persons might indicate the future risk of a heart attack, sudden cardiac death, stroke, and peripheral artery disease.

Lab tests often ordered with a hs-CRP test:

  • Complete Blood Count
  • Lipid Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lp-Pla2
  • Glucose

Conditions where a hs-CRP test is recommended:

  • Heart Attack
  • Heart Disease
  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Stroke

How does my health care provider use a hs-CRP test?

A test for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein can be used to assess a person's risk of cardiovascular disease. It can be used in conjunction with a lipid profile or other cardiac risk markers, such as the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 test, to provide further information regarding the risk of heart disease.

CRP is a protein that rises in the bloodstream as a result of inflammation. A continuous low level of inflammation, according to studies, plays a crucial role in atherosclerosis, the narrowing of blood vessels caused by the build-up of cholesterol and other lipids, which is typically linked to CVD. The hs-CRP test successfully detects low levels of C-reactive protein, indicating low but chronic inflammation, and so aids in predicting a person's risk of developing CVD.

Some specialists believe that high-sensitivity CRP is a good test for assessing CVD, heart attacks, and stroke risk, and that it can help in the evaluation process before a person gets one of these health problems. Some experts believe that combining a good marker for inflammation, such as hs-CRP, with a lipid profile is the best way to predict risk. This test has been recommended by several organizations for persons who are at a moderate risk of having a heart attack in the following ten years.

What does my hs-CRP test result mean?

Even when cholesterol levels are within an acceptable range, high levels of hs-CRP in otherwise healthy people have been found to predict an elevated risk of future heart attacks, strokes, sudden cardiac death, and/or peripheral arterial disease.

Higher hs-CRP concentrations indicate a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, while lower values indicate a lower risk. Individuals with hs-CRP values at the high end of the normal range are 1.5 to 4 times more likely than those with low levels of hs-CRP to have a heart attack.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Apolipoprotein A1 is the primary protein associated with HDL cholesterol. Like HDL cholesterol, increased concentrations are associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.

Description: Apolipoprotein B is a blood test that measures that amount of Apolipoprotein B in the blood’s serum. This test is used to assess cardiovascular risk.

Also Known As: Apo B Test, Apolipoprotein B-100 Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Apolipoprotein B test ordered?

Apolipoprotein A-I and B, as well as other lipid tests, may be ordered as part of a screening to identify a person's risk of cardiovascular disease.

Apo B is a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism and is the major protein component of lipoproteins including VLDL and LDL, popularly known as "bad cholesterol." Apo B concentrations are similar to LDL-C concentrations.

What does an Apolipoprotein B blood test check for?

Lipids are transported throughout the bloodstream by apolipoproteins, which mix with them. Lipoproteins are held together by apolipoproteins, which protect the water-repellent lipids at their core.

Lipoproteins are cholesterol or triglyceride-rich proteins that transport lipids throughout the body for cell absorption. HDL, on the other hand, is like an empty cab. It travels to the tissues to collect excess cholesterol before returning it to the liver. Cholesterol is either recycled for future use or eliminated in bile in the liver. The only mechanism for cells to get rid of excess cholesterol is by HDL reverse transport. It protects the arteries and, if enough HDL is present, it can even reverse the formation of fatty plaques, which are deposits caused by atherosclerosis and can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Chylomicrons are lipoprotein particles that transport dietary fats from the digestive system to tissue, primarily the liver, via the bloodstream. These dietary lipids are repackaged in the liver and combined with apo B-100 to create triglyceride-rich VLDL. This combo is similar to a taxi with a full load of passengers and apo B-100 as the driver. The taxi moves from place to place in the bloodstream, releasing one passenger at a time.

Triglycerides are removed from VLDL by an enzyme called lipoprotein lipase, which produces intermediate density lipoproteins first, then LDL. VLDL contains one molecule of apo B-100, which is kept as VLDL loses triglycerides and shrinks to become the cholesterol-rich LDL. Apo B-100 is detected by receptors on the surface of many different types of cells in the body. The absorption of cholesterol into cells is aided by these receptors.

LDL and apo B-100 transport cholesterol that is essential for cell membrane integrity, sex hormone generation, and steroid production. Excess LDL, on the other hand, can cause fatty deposits in artery walls, as well as blood vessel hardening and scarring. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which fatty deposits restrict blood arteries. The risk of a heart attack increases as the atherosclerotic process progresses.

LDL-C levels, which are typically ordered as part of a lipid profile, tend to mimic Apo B-100 levels. Many experts believe that apo B levels will eventually show to be a more accurate predictor of CVD risk than LDL-C. Others disagree, believing that vitamin B is only a modestly superior choice and that it should not be used on a regular basis. The clinical utility of apo B, as well as other developing cardiac risk markers including apo A-I, Lp(a), and hs-CRP, is still unknown.

Lab tests often ordered with an Apolipoprotein B test:

  • Apolipoprotein A1
  • Cholesterol Total
  • HDL Cholesterol
  • LDL Cholesterol
  • Triglycerides
  • Lipid Panel
  • Lipoprotein (a)
  • Homocysteine
  • hs-CRP
  • Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility

Conditions where an Apolipoprotein B test is recommended:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Heart Attack
  • Stroke
  • Congestive Heart Failure
  • Angina

How does my health care provider use an Apolipoprotein B test?

An apo B/apo A-I ratio can be determined by ordering both an apo A-I and an apo B test. To assess the risk of developing CVD, this ratio is sometimes used instead of the total cholesterol/HDL ratio.

As an alternative to non-HDL-C, Apo B levels may be ordered to assess the success of lipid treatment.

An apo B test may be conducted in rare circumstances to assist determine a genetic issue that causes apo B overproduction or underproduction.

What do my Apolipoprotein B test results mean?

Raised apo B levels are linked to elevated LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels, and are linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Elevations may be caused by a high-fat diet and/or a reduction in LDL clearance from the blood.

A direct cause of abnormal apo B levels is some hereditary diseases. Familial combined hyperlipidemia, for example, is an inherited condition that causes excessive cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood. Apolipoprotein B deficiency, also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome, is a relatively rare hereditary disorder that results in unusually low amounts of apo B.

A variety of underlying diseases and other factors might result in abnormal apo B levels.

Is apoB a heart disease risk factor? 
The markers of particle number, apoB, or LDL particle number were better at predicting the risk of heart disease than LDL-C.

There are two major forms of Apolipoprotein B, B-100 and B-48. B-100, synthesized in the liver, is the major protein in VLDL, IDL, and LDL cholesterol. B-48, synthesized in the intestines, is essential for the assembly and secretion of chylomicrons. Patients with increased concentrations of Apolipoprotein B are at increased risk of atherosclerosis.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: A CBC or Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets test is a blood test that measures many important features of your blood’s red and white blood cells and platelets. A Complete Blood Count can be used to evaluate your overall health and detect a wide variety of conditions such as infection, anemia, and leukemia. It also looks at other important aspects of your blood health such as hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. 

Also Known As: CBC test, Complete Blood Count Test, Total Blood Count Test, CBC with Differential and Platelets test, Hemogram test  

Collection Method: Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: Whole Blood 

Test Preparation: No preparation required 

When is a Complete Blood Count test ordered?  

The complete blood count (CBC) is an extremely common test. When people go to the doctor for a standard checkup or blood work, they often get a CBC. Suppose a person is healthy and their results are within normal ranges. In that case, they may not need another CBC unless their health condition changes, or their healthcare professional believes it is necessary. 

When a person exhibits a variety of signs and symptoms that could be connected to blood cell abnormalities, a CBC may be done. A health practitioner may request a CBC to help diagnose and determine the severity of lethargy or weakness, as well as infection, inflammation, bruises, or bleeding. 

When a person is diagnosed with a disease that affects blood cells, a CBC is frequently done regularly to keep track of their progress. Similarly, if someone is being treated for a blood condition, a CBC may be performed on a regular basis to see if the treatment is working. 

Chemotherapy, for example, can influence the generation of cells in the bone marrow. Some drugs can lower WBC counts in the long run. To monitor various medication regimens, a CBC may be required on a regular basis. 

What does a Complete Blood Count test check for? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test that determines the number of cells in circulation. White blood cells (WBCs), red blood cells (RBCs), and platelets (PLTs) are three types of cells suspended in a fluid called plasma. They are largely created and matured in the bone marrow and are released into the bloodstream when needed under normal circumstances. 

A CBC is mainly performed with an automated machine that measures a variety of factors, including the number of cells present in a person's blood sample. The findings of a CBC can reveal not only the quantity of different cell types but also the physical properties of some of the cells. 

Significant differences in one or more blood cell populations may suggest the presence of one or more diseases. Other tests are frequently performed to assist in determining the reason for aberrant results. This frequently necessitates visual confirmation via a microscope examination of a blood smear. A skilled laboratory technician can assess the appearance and physical features of blood cells, such as size, shape, and color, and note any anomalies. Any extra information is taken note of and communicated to the healthcare provider. This information provides the health care provider with further information about the cause of abnormal CBC results. 

The CBC focuses on three different types of cells: 

WBCs (White Blood Cells) 

The body uses five different types of WBCs, also known as leukocytes, to keep itself healthy and battle infections and other types of harm. The five different leukocytes are eosinophiles, lymphocytes, neutrophiles, basophils, and monocytes. They are found in relatively steady numbers in the blood. Depending on what is going on in the body, these values may momentarily rise or fall. An infection, for example, can cause the body to manufacture more neutrophils in order to combat bacterial infection. The amount of eosinophils in the body may increase as a result of allergies. A viral infection may cause an increase in lymphocyte production. Abnormal (immature or mature) white cells multiply fast in certain illness situations, such as leukemia, raising the WBC count. 

RBCs (Red Blood Cells) 

The bone marrow produces red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes, which are transferred into the bloodstream after maturing. Hemoglobin, a protein that distributes oxygen throughout the body, is found in these cells. Because RBCs have a 120-day lifespan, the bone marrow must constantly manufacture new RBCs to replace those that have aged and disintegrated or have been lost due to hemorrhage. A variety of diseases, including those that cause severe bleeding, can alter the creation of new RBCs and their longevity. 

The CBC measures the number of RBCs and hemoglobin in the blood, as well as the proportion of RBCs in the blood (hematocrit), and if the RBC population appears to be normal. RBCs are generally homogeneous in size and shape, with only minor differences; however, considerable variances can arise in illnesses including vitamin B12 and folate inadequacy, iron deficiency, and a range of other ailments. Anemia occurs when the concentration of red blood cells and/or the amount of hemoglobin in the blood falls below normal, resulting in symptoms such as weariness and weakness. In a far smaller percentage of cases, there may be an excess of RBCs in the blood (erythrocytosis or polycythemia). This might obstruct the flow of blood through the tiny veins and arteries in extreme circumstances. 

Platelets 

Platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small cell fragments that aid in the regular clotting of blood. A person with insufficient platelets is more likely to experience excessive bleeding and bruises. Excess platelets can induce excessive clotting or excessive bleeding if the platelets are not operating properly. The platelet count and size are determined by the CBC. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Complete Blood Count test: 

  • Reticulocytes
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity
  • Basic Metabolic Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • Lipid Panel
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate
  • Prothrombin with INR and Partial Thromboplastin Times
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Von Willebrand Factor Antigen

Conditions where a Complete Blood Count test is recommended: 

  • Anemia
  • Aplastic Anemia
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate Deficiency
  • Sickle Cell Anemia
  • Heart Disease
  • Thalassemia
  • Leukemia
  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Cancer
  • Bleeding Disorders
  • Inflammation
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Mononucleosis

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How does my health care provider use a Complete Blood Count test? 

The complete blood count (CBC) is a common, comprehensive screening test used to measure a person's overall health status.  

What do my Complete Blood Count results mean? 

A low Red Blood Cell Count, also known as anemia, could be due many different causes such as chronic bleeding, a bone marrow disorder, and nutritional deficiency just to name a few. A high Red Blood Cell Count, also known as polycythemia, could be due to several conditions including lung disease, dehydration, and smoking. Both Hemoglobin and Hematocrit tend to reflect Red Blood Cell Count results, so if your Red Blood Cell Count is low, your Hematocrit and Hemoglobin will likely also be low. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Differential results mean? 

A low White Blood Cell count or low WBC count, also known as leukopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, severe infection, and lymphoma. A high White Blood Cell count, or high WBC count, also known as leukocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including infection, leukemia, and inflammation. Abnormal levels in your White Blood Cell Count will be reflected in one or more of your different white blood cells. Knowing which white blood cell types are affected will help your healthcare provider narrow down the issue. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

What do my Platelet results mean? 

A low Platelet Count, also known as thrombocytopenia, could be due to a number of different disorders including autoimmune issues, viral infection, and leukemia. A high Platelet Count, also known as Thrombocytosis, can also be due to many different disorders including cancer, iron deficiency, and rheumatoid arthritis. Results should be discussed with your health care provider who can provide interpretation of your results and determine the appropriate next steps or lab tests to further investigate your health. 

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported. Certain biomarkers do not appear in healthy individuals. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

Description: A Comprehensive Metabolic Panel or CMP is a blood test that is a combination of a Basic Metabolic Panel, a Liver Panel, and electrolyte panel, and is used to screen for, diagnose, and monitor a variety of conditions and diseases such as liver disease, diabetes, and kidney disease. 

Also Known As: CMP, Chem, Chem-14, Chem-12, Chem-21, Chemistry Panel, Chem Panel, Chem Screen, Chemistry Screen, SMA 12, SMA 20, SMA 21, SMAC, Chem test

Collection Method: 

Blood Draw 

Specimen Type: 

Serum 

Test Preparation: 

9-12 hours fasting is preferred. 

When is a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test ordered:  

A CMP is frequently requested as part of a lab test for a medical evaluation or yearly physical. A CMP test consists of many different tests that give healthcare providers a range of information about your health, including liver and kidney function, electrolyte balance, and blood sugar levels. To confirm or rule out a suspected diagnosis, abnormal test results are frequently followed up with other tests that provide a more in depth or targeted analysis of key areas that need investigating. 

What does a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel blood test check for? 

The complete metabolic panel (CMP) is a set of 20 tests that provides critical information to a healthcare professional about a person's current metabolic status, check for liver or kidney disease, electrolyte and acid/base balance, and blood glucose and blood protein levels. Abnormal results, particularly when they are combined, can suggest a problem that needs to be addressed. 

The following tests are included in the CMP: 

  • Albumin: this is a measure of Albumin levels in your blood. Albumin is a protein made by the liver that is responsible for many vital roles including transporting nutrients throughout the body and preventing fluid from leaking out of blood vessels. 

  • Albumin/Globulin Ratio: this is a ratio between your total Albumin and Globulin  

  • Alkaline Phosphatase: this is a measure of Alkaline phosphatase or ALP in your blood. Alkaline phosphatase is a protein found in all body tissues, however the ALP found in blood comes from the liver and bones. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage, gallbladder disease, or bone disorder. 

  • Alt: this is a measure of Alanine transaminase or ALT in your blood. Alanine Aminotransferase is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver with small amounts in the heart and muscles. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage. 

  • AST: this is a measure of Aspartate Aminotransferase or AST. Aspartate Aminotransferase is an enzyme found mostly in the heart and liver, with smaller amounts in the kidney and muscles. Elevated levels are often associated with liver damage. 

  • Bilirubin, Total: this is a measure of bilirubin in your blood. Bilirubin is an orange-yellowish waste product produced from the breakdown of heme which is a component of hemoglobin found in red blood cells. The liver is responsible for removal of bilirubin from the body. 

  • Bun/Creatinine Ratio: this is a ratio between your Urea Nitrogen (BUN) result and Creatinine result.  

  • Calcium: this is a measurement of calcium in your blood. Calcium is the most abundant and one of the most important minerals in the body as it essential for proper nerve, muscle, and heart function. 

  • Calcium: is used for blood clot formation and the formation and maintenance of bones and teeth. 

  • Carbon Dioxide: this is a measure of carbon dioxide in your blood. Carbon dioxide is a negatively charged electrolyte that works with other electrolytes such as chloride, potassium, and sodium to regulate the body’s acid-base balance and fluid levels.  

  • Chloride: this is a measure of Chloride in your blood. Chloride is a negatively charged electrolyte that works with other electrolytes such as potassium and sodium to regulate the body’s acid-base balance and fluid levels. 

  • Creatinine: this is a measure of Creatinine levels in your blood. Creatinine is created from the breakdown of creatine in your muscles and is removed from your body by the kidneys. Elevated creatinine levels are often associated with kidney damage. 

  • Egfr African American: this is a measure of how well your kidneys are functioning. Glomeruli are tiny filters in your kidneys that filter out waste products from your blood for removal while retaining important substances such as nutrients and blood cells. 

  • Egfr Non-Afr. American: this is a measure of how well your kidneys are functioning. Glomeruli are tiny filters in your kidneys that filter out waste products from your blood for removal while retaining important substances such as nutrients and blood cells. 

  • Globulin: this is a measure of all blood proteins in your blood that are not albumin. 

  • Glucose: this is a measure of glucose in your blood. Glucose is created from the breakdown of carbohydrates during digestion and is the body’s primary source of energy. 

  • Potassium: this is a measure of Potassium in your blood. Potassium is an electrolyte that plays a vital role in cell metabolism, nerve and muscle function, and transport of nutrients into cells and removal of wastes products out of cells. 

  • Protein, Total: this is a measure of total protein levels in your blood. 
    Sodium: this is a measure of Sodium in your blood. Sodium is an electrolyte that plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function. 

  • Urea Nitrogen (Bun): this is a measure of Urea Nitrogen in your blood, also known as Blood UreaNitrogen (BUN). Urea is a waste product created in the liver when proteins are broken down into amino acids. Elevated levels are often associated with kidney damage. 

Lab tests often ordered with a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test: 

  • Complete Blood Count with Differential and Platelets
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity
  • Lipid Panel
  • Vitamin B12 and Folate
  • Prothrombin with INR and Partial Thromboplastin Times
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein

Conditions where a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test is recommended: 

  • Diabetes
  • Kidney Disease
  • Liver Disease
  • Hypertension

Commonly Asked Questions: 

How does my health care provider use a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test? 

The comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) is a broad screening tool for assessing organ function and detecting diseases like diabetes, liver disease, and kidney disease. The CMP test may also be requested to monitor known disorders such as hypertension and to check for any renal or liver-related side effects in persons taking specific drugs. If a health practitioner wants to follow two or more separate CMP components, the full CMP might be ordered because it contains more information. 

What do my Comprehensive Metabolic Panel test results mean? 

The results of the tests included in the CMP are usually analyzed together to look for patterns. A single abnormal test result may indicate something different than a series of abnormal test findings. A high result on one of the liver enzyme tests, for example, is not the same as a high result on several liver enzyme tests. 

Several sets of CMPs, frequently performed on various days, may be examined to gain insights into the underlying disease and response to treatment, especially in hospitalized patients. 

Out-of-range findings for any of the CMP tests can be caused by a variety of illnesses, including kidney failure, breathing issues, and diabetes-related complications, to name a few. If any of the results are abnormal, one or more follow-up tests are usually ordered to help determine the reason and/or establish a diagnosis. 

Is there anything else I should know? 

A wide range of prescription and over-the-counter medications can have an impact on the results of the CMP's components. Any medications you're taking should be disclosed to your healthcare professional. Similarly, it is critical to provide a thorough history because many other circumstances can influence how your results are interpreted. 

What's the difference between the CMP and the BMP tests, and why would my doctor choose one over the other? 

The CMP consists of 14 tests, while the basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a subset of those with eight tests. The liver (ALP, ALT, AST, and bilirubin) and protein (albumin and total protein) tests are not included. If a healthcare provider wants a more thorough picture of a person's organ function or to check for specific illnesses like diabetes or liver or kidney disease, he or she may prescribe a CMP rather than a BMP. 

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

Please note the following regarding BUN/Creatinine ratio: 

The lab does not report the calculation for the BUN/Creatinine Ratio unless one or both biomarkers’ results fall out of the published range. 

If you still wish to see the value, it's easy to calculate. Simply take your Urea Nitrogen (BUN) result and divide it by your Creatinine result.  

As an example, if your Urea Nitrogen result is 11 and your Creatinine result is 0.86, then you would divide 11 by 0.86 and get a BUN/Creatinine Ratio result of 12.79. 



Did your physician or healthcare provider recommend an ODX functional blood chemistry analysis test to you, but you're unsure what it is?

Do you have a family history of an inheritable condition that has you concerned about your health status?

Or, are you feeling healthy but interested in monitoring your general wellbeing?

If any of these questions apply to you, we can help you better understand ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing. You will be much more prepared and relaxed as you prepare for your test. 

What Is ODX Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis Testing?

ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing is one of the most critical entry-level assessments that your doctor can order for you. Dr. Weatherby from Optimal DX first developed it to standardize the functional interpretation of blood chemistry tests. 

As a preventive diagnosis tool, ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing allows your doctor to reduce the time spent analyzing multiple blood tests. The tests can be used as a prognostic marker for dysfunction if the test identifies abnormal blood chemistry.

Through ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing, your blood biomarkers can be monitored over time to detect changes in your health before they develop into a condition that can negatively impact your health. Your results can be monitored over time to detect if there are any concerning changes. 

ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing goes beyond routine testing. It is more comprehensive, and it includes a cross-section of tests to evaluates your body systems and the state of your health to help identify conditions you may not yet be experience symptoms. It looks at underlying health issues and evaluates the state of your health and any conditions you may have. Results from this test can help you catch critical changes in your body before they manifest into a more serious condition.

What are the Benefits of General Wellness Lab Testing?

General wellness lab testing is performed to evaluate your overall health and screen for health conditions. Like an annual physical or a biennial dental cleaning, general wellness lab testing is a great tool to check up on your body and make sure there are no underlying issues. 

Through these tests, a variety of biomarkers are reviewed and analyzed for any concerning trends. By conducting these tests, you can receive an early warning of any potential issues with your health. 

General wellness lab testing helps you react to any risk factors and proactively target lifestyle changes. Some diseases or conditions develop over time without any symptoms, so lab testing enables you to identify these conditions earlier. 

These tests can also help confirm or rule out inherited conditions. Knowing that tested levels are "normal" might help relieve stress about your general wellbeing. 

ODX Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis Testing Lab Panels

There are five blood chemistry panel options typically available for ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing:

The ODX Vital panel is the smallest option. It contains 19 tests with 80 biomarkers. This panel includes a CBC (complete blood count) and CMP (comprehensive metabolic panel), as well as a number of screening tests to evaluate your liver and kidney functions. This panel also includes some hormonal tests to monitor your thyroid and pituitary glands. This panel serves as a great starting point to determine if all of your vital biomarkers are within normal ranges.

ODX Max contains slightly more tests, with 33 tests in total and analyzing 100 biomarkers. Some of these additional tests help to evaluate your cardiovascular, skeletal, and muscular health. This panel also tests sex hormones and biomarkers, such as DHEA sulfate, estradiol, testosterone, and SHBG (sex hormone-binding globulin). Last but not least, this panel adds a test for insulin, which is vital for regulating blood glucose levels. Abnormalities in any of these tests can provide an early warning sign for a serious condition. 

The ODX Ultimate has two versions - male and female. These two versions contain 41 and 42 tests and evaluate 110 and 111 biomarkers, respectively. Additional tests for sex hormones are included in this panel. The Ultimate panel takes a more granular look at VLDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein A (which is carried in HDL cholesterol). Monitoring these levels early on can help you to make lifestyle changes to prevent and/or manage medical conditions.

Last but not least, the ODX Comprehensive panel contains the most tests of any of the options. This panel has 52 tests with 123 biomarkers. It contains all the tests mentioned in previous panels and tests for the prostate, parathyroid, and thyroid. This panel is the best option if you feel poorly and are unsure of the cause or if you have any concerning trends from your family health history.

Understanding which tests you want to review will help you narrow down your selection for which panel you should choose.

Frequently Asked Questions About ODX Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis Testing

You may still have some questions about this test and how it applies to you. Here are some frequently asked questions about ODX functional blood chemistry analysis testing:

  • Q: If I order multiple blood tests, will I need to have more than one needle stick?
    A: No; in fact, it's fairly common to order multiple lab tests off of a single blood draw where there is just one needle stick
  • Q: What do I need to do to prepare for my test?
    A: Each test has different requirements for preparation, but typically overnight fasting (or fasting up to 12 hours) is preferred
  • Q: Should I continue to take medication before getting my test?
    A: Yes; you should always take any medication that has been prescribed to you by a physician 
  • Q: What should I do if I receive an abnormal result?
    A: Abnormalities should be considered early warnings; they don't necessarily mean that you have an illness or disease. If you receive an abnormal result, reach out to your physician or healthcare provider for evaluation, further testing, and diagnosis

Benefits of General Wellness Lab Testing With Ulta Lab Tests

Ulta Lab Tests offers highly accurate and reliable tests so that you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are a few great things to love about Ulta Lab Tests:

  • You'll get secure and confidential results
  • You don't need health insurance
  • You don't need a physician's referral
  • You'll get affordable pricing
  • We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee

Order your ODX functional blood chemistry analysis lab tests today, and your results will be provided to you online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

Take control of your health with Ulta Lab Tests today!