Magnesium Deficiency

Magnesium blood tests are crucial for diagnosing a deficiency in the level of magnesium found in the red blood cells. Learn more about magnesium deficiency and the importance of testing here.


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Urinary magnesium concentrations often decline before serum concentrations. Adverse effects, such as cardiac arrhythmias, can be observed while serum concentrations are within range.


Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

The MAG - Vitamin A&D, Mag RBC, Zinc, Cu, Iron & Ferritin contains the following tests:

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Transferrin
  • Vitamin A (Retinol)
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.


Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Magnesium RBC, Zinc, and Copper  Panel contains the following tests.

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Iron Panel, Transferrin and Hemoglobin

  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb) included in the CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Transferrin

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Magnesium RBC, Zinc, Copper with Iron Panel contains the following tests.

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Transferrin
  • Zinc

 

 

 

Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Vitamin D (1-25, D2, D3), Mag RBC, & Calcium Panel contains the following tests.

  • Calcium, Ionized
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Vitamin D, 1,25-Dihydroxy, LC/MS/MS

 

  • Magnesium RBC (Red Blood Cell): it’s the KEY catalyst for creating “Storage” and “Active” forms of this Hormone…
  • 25(OH)D blood test: it’s the measure of the “Storage” form, the precursor to “Active” form of this Hormone…
  • 1,25(OH)2 D3 blood test: it’s the measure of the “Active” form of this Hormone…
  • “Ionized” Serum Calcium blood test (NOT a standard serum test!): given that Calcitriol’s JOB in the body is to put MORE Calcium into the bloodstream, it only makes sense to know exactly how much you have there already, right?…

 

 

 



Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's 

MAG - Vitamin D (1-25, D2 ,D3), Potassium RBC & Calcium contains the following tests.

  • Calcium, Ionized
  • Potassium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Vitamin D, 1,25-Dihydroxy, LC/MS/MS
     

 

 


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Serum calcium is involved in the regulation of neuromuscular and enzyme activity, bone metabolism and blood coagulation. Calcium blood levels are controlled by a complex interaction of parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, calcitonin and adrenal cortical steroids. Calcium measurements are useful in the diagnosis of parathyroid disease, some bone disorders and chronic renal disease. A low level of calcium may result in tetany.

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The ionized calcium is determined by an ion selective electrode methodology. The result that is generated is pH adjusted. The result is empirically based on a measured pH and ionized calcium concentration normalized to a pH of 7.40. This calculation compensates for in vitro changes in pH due to loss of CO2 through specimen handling. Ionized calcium represents the true "bioavailable" calcium in the circulation. In situations where the total calcium is normal but does not fit the clinical picture, e.g., hyperparathyroidism, a determination of the ionized calcium will, many times, show an elevation in the "bioavailable" calcium component. This may be due to alterations in protein concentrations, especially albumin, that binds most of the calcium in the circulation.


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Decreased levels of ceruloplasmin are found in Wilson''s Disease, fulminant liver failure, intestinal malabsorption, renal failure resulting in proteinuria, chronic active hepatitis and malnutrition. Elevated levels are found in primary biliary cirrhosis, pregnancy (first trimester), oral contraceptive use and in acute inflammatory conditions since ceruloplasmin is an acute phase reactant

A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia, and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported.

Reflex Parameters for Manual Slide Review
  Less than  Greater Than 
WBC  1.5 x 10^3  30.0 x 10^3 
Hemoglobin  7.0 g/dL  19.0 g/dL 
Hematocrit  None  75%
Platelet  100 x 10^3  800 x 10^3 
MCV  70 fL  115 fL 
MCH  22 pg  37 pg 
MCHC  29 g/dL  36.5 g/dL 
RBC  None  8.00 x 10^6 
RDW  None  21.5
Relative Neutrophil %  1% or ABNC <500  None 
Relative Lymphocyte %  1% 70%
Relative Monocyte %  None  25%
Eosinophil  None  35%
Basophil  None  3.50%
     
Platelet  <75 with no flags,
>100 and <130 with platelet clump flag present,
>1000 
Instrument Flags Variant lymphs, blasts,
immature neutrophils,  nRBC’s, abnormal platelets,
giant platelets, potential interference
     
The automated differential averages 6000+ cells. If none of the above parameters are met, the results are released without manual review.
CBC Reflex Pathway

Step 1 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes:

  • Confirmation of differential percentages
  • WBC and platelet estimates, when needed
  • Full review of RBC morphology
  • Comments for toxic changes, RBC inclusions, abnormal lymphs, and other
  • significant findings
  • If the differential percentages agree with the automated counts and no abnormal cells are seen, the automated differential is reported with appropriate comments

Step 2 - The slide review is performed by qualified Laboratory staff and includes: If any of the following are seen on the slide review, Laboratory staff will perform a manual differential:

  • Immature, abnormal, or toxic cells
  • nRBC’s
  • Disagreement with automated differential
  • Atypical/abnormal RBC morphology
  • Any RBC inclusions

Step 3 If any of the following are seen on the manual differential, a Pathologist will review the slide:

  • WBC<1,500 with abnormal cells noted
  • Blasts/immature cells, hairy cell lymphs, or megakaryocytes
  • New abnormal lymphocytes or monocytes
  • Variant or atypical lymphs >15%
  • Blood parasites
  • RBC morphology with 3+ spherocytes, RBC inclusions, suspect Hgb-C,
  • crystals, Pappenheimer bodies or bizarre morphology
  • nRBC’s

Comprehensive Metabolic Panel


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Copper is an essential element that is a cofactor of many enzymes. Copper metabolism is disturbed in Wilson's disease, Menkes disease, primary biliary cirrhosis, and Indian childhood cirrhosis. Copper concentrations increase in acute phase reactions and during the third trimester of pregnancy. Copper concentrations are decreased with nephrosis, malabsorption, and malnutrition. Copper concentrations are also useful to monitor patients, especially preterm newborns, on nutritional supplementation. Results of copper are often interpreted together with ceruloplasmin.

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Useful in the diagnosis of hypochromic, microcytic anemias. Decreased in iron deficiency anemia and increased in iron overload.


Morley Robbins Magnesium Advocacy Group's Full Monty Panel contains the following tests:

  • Ceruloplasmin
  • Copper
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin (Hgb)
  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • Transferrin
  • Vitamin A (Retinol)
  • Zinc

Patients who were advised to take this test by Morley Robbins and the Magnesium Advocacy Group should notify the lab attendant that the preferred specimen for their Ceruloplasmin and Copper tests is SERUM. The preferred specimen for the Zinc test is PLASMA. Please be aware that it is at the lab’s discretion to decide which specimen type is most appropriate.

Customers should refrain from taking vitamins, or mineral herbal supplements for at least one week before sample collection for Magnesium RBC.


Usual method for determining anemia. Used to calculate indices.

Serum iron quantification is useful in confirming the diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia or hemochromatosis. The measurement of total iron binding in the same specimen may facilitate the clinician''s ability to distinguish between low serum iron levels caused by iron deficiency from those related to inflammatory neoplastic disorders. The assay for iron measures the amount of iron which is bound to transferrin. The total iron binding capacity (TIBC) measures the amount of iron that would appear in blood if all the transferrin were saturated with iron. It is an indirect measurement of transferri



Measurement of serum 25-OH vitamin D concentrations provide a good index of circulating vitamin D activity in patients not suffering from renal disease. Lower than normal 25-OH vitamin D levels can result from a dietary deficiency, poor absorption of the vitamin or impaired metabolism of the sterol in the liver. A 25-OH vitamin D deficiency can lead to bone diseases such as rickets and osteomalacia. Above normal levels can lead hypercalcemia. This assay employs liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to independently measure and report the two common forms of 25-hydroxy vitamin D: 25OH D3 - the endogenous form of the vitamin and 25OH D2 - the analog form used to treat 25OH Vitamin D3 deficiency. While this assay will produce accurate Vitamin D results on patients of any age, it is specifically indicated for infants less than 3 years of age.



How often do you think about your mineral levels? 

Unless you're a professional athlete, doctor, or nutritionist, it probably doesn't cross your mind more than once a year at your annual physical. If you're taking a multivitamin, that's even better than most!

Magnesium is crucial to the body's muscle, hormonal, and nerve function. Without it, you're likely feeling tired, crampy, and anxious. You may have a hard time focusing and struggle to sleep, digest meals, or enjoy sex. 

Magnesium blood tests are the first look into what your body may be lacking. Read on to understand how magnesium deficiency feels and how the correct magnesium deficiency test can start you on the right track to functional healing.   

Risk Factors For Magnesium Deficiency 

Some populations are at a higher risk for magnesium deficiency. These include: 

  • Diabetics
  • Those with an unhealthy diet 
  • Pregnant women
  • Those taking medications that inhibit magnesium stores in the body 
  • Those with vitamin D deficiency 
  • Those with gastrointestinal conditions
  • Alcoholics

If you fall under any of these groups, it might be worth getting tested.  

Causes of Magnesium Deficiency 

Magnesium deficiency is caused by the body's inability to properly absorb the mineral in the gut or excess magnesium loss through the body's waste. In addition, kidney problems may affect magnesium excretion, as it is the kidney's responsibility to determine optimal levels in the body. 

Magnesium levels are also known to take a hit during pregnancy.  

Nutrition lacking in essential vitamins and minerals may also affect magnesium levels. 

Signs and Symptoms of Magnesium Deficiency

Magnesium is a metabolic necessity in our bodies. It's needed in optimal amounts for your bones, muscles, nerves, digestive tract, hormones, blood sugar, and heart. 

Magnesium deficiency can range from barely noticeable to extremely uncomfortable. Signs and symptoms of magnesium deficiency include: 

  • Muscle cramping
  • Depression and anxiety 
  • Osteoporosis 
  • Fatigue and poor sleep 
  • High blood pressure and heart arrhythmia 
  • Poor appetite
  • Nausea 
  • Weakness 
  • Headaches
  • Low levels of other minerals - like calcium and potassium 

Having any one of a few of these symptoms may not necessarily point to a deficiency. It will take a lab test to determine if you are. 

Lab Tests for Magnesium Deficiency  

Your doctor will require a magnesium deficiency lab test to screen, diagnose and monitor your condition. To confirm that you are magnesium deficient, a doctor may request a urine sample, though a blood test is most efficient. 

A magnesium deficiency test is also known as a serum magnesium test. Its purpose is to measure the amount of magnesium in the blood–-though a majority of the body's magnesium stores are found in the bones. 

You can initiate your blood draw from one of 2,100 state and federally certified blood-draw centers near your home. Once your specimen is collected, it is sent to Quest Diagnostics to process, and your results will be available for you to view on your Ulta Lab Tests dashboard.

An optimal blood (serum) magnesium level is is 1.8 to 2.2 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Anything lower than this range may be diagnosed by your doctor as hypomagnesemia and will need an immediate treatment plan. 

Magnesium Deficiency Lab Tests FAQ

If this is all very new to you, don't worry! We have a dedicated team prepared to answer your questions and an intuitive website to easily select and order your tests and review your results.

What are the types of magnesium deficiency? 

Though there is a singular metric for magnesium deficiency in the human body, there are a few different types of magnesium. These include: 

  • Magnesium citrate - extremely bioavailable source of magnesium naturally found in citrus fruits and supplements
  • Magnesium oxide - not typically used for magnesium deficiencies, but valuable for soothing digestive symptoms  
  • Magnesium chloride - easily absorbed in the digestive system and used for treating low magnesium levels, heartburn, and constipation
  • Magnesium lactate - often taken by those who need high levels of magnesium 
  • Magnesium malate - a gentle supplemental form of magnesium 
  • Magnesium taurate - supports healthy blood pressure 
  • Magnesium L-threonate - known for increasing magnesium levels in brain cells
  • Magnesium sulfate - used to soothe achy muscles-- also known as Epsom salt
  • Magnesium glycinate - magnesium with calming properties
  • Magnesium orotate - used to treat symptoms of severe congestive heart failure and blood pressure disorders

Once you receive your lab results, you can work with your healthcare professional to determine the best course of action. 

Who should be tested for magnesium deficiency? 

If you meet any of the above risk factors, are experiencing low libido, poor sleep, or lethargy, you may want to get tested for magnesium deficiency. Improving your magnesium levels may improve your quality of life. 

How is magnesium deficiency diagnosed? 

Magnesium deficiency, or hypomagnesemia, will appear on a blood test. Once you have received your convenient results, your doctor will determine your next course of action. 

Are results shared privately? 

Yes, we provide secure and confidential results. You may access your results within your private online account. 

Do you require insurance or a doctor's referral to receive magnesium deficiency testing? 

No, you may purchase lab testing without insurance or a doctor's note. Our tests are for those who want to take a proactive role in monitoring their health. 

How do you approach customer service? 

Finally, we provide a 100% satisfaction guarantee. If you aren't happy with our service, we'll work to make it right.

Magnesium Blood Tests With Ulta Lab Tests

Are you dealing with the fallout of a potential magnesium deficiency? A magnesium blood test is just one test away from feeling confident and in control of your body.

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable so that you can make informed decisions about your health. Here are a few great things to love about Ulta Lab Tests:

- You'll get secure and confidential results
- You don't need health insurance
- You don't need a physician's referral
- You'll get affordable pricing
- We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee

Order your magnesium deficiency lab test today. The results of our magnesium blood tests can be provided to you securely and confidently online–usually within 24-48 hours!

Take charge of your health and track your progress with Ulta Lab Tests.