Chlamydia

Our Chlamydia test is the first step towards maintaining sexual wellness essential for you and your partner's health and fixing it.


Name Matches
Most Popular

Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimens: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube labe

Clinical Significance

C. trachomatis infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases in the united states. C. trachomatis is known to cause cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymitis and proctitis. It is also the most frequent cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. Among women, the consequences of chlamydial infections are severe if left untreated. Approximately half of chlamydial infections are asymptomatic.


Most Popular

Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimen: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube label.

 

Clinical Significance

C. trachomatis infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. C. trachomatis is known to cause cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymitis and proctitis. It is also the most frequent cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. Among women, the consequences of Chlamydialinfections are severe if left untreated. Approximately half of Chlamydial infections are asymptomatic.
Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci) is the causative agent of gonorrhea. In men, this disease generally results in anterior urethritis accompanied by purulent exudate. In women, the disease is most often found in the cervix, but the vagina and uterus may also be infected.


Includes
Chlamydophila pneumoniae (IgG, IgM and IgA), Chlamydia trachomatis (IgG, IgM and IgA), Chlamydophila psittaci (IgG, IgM and IgA)

Clinical Significance

Chlamydia/chlamydophila species includes C. pneumoniaeC. psittaci, and C. trachomatis. Each may cause pneumonia and other overlapping medical conditions.

 

 


Chlamydia trachomatis is associated with infections of the mucous membranes of the urogenital system, the upper respiratory tract, and the eye. In industrialized countries, C. trachomatis usually causes sexually transmitted disease. In developing countries, it is the major cause of preventable blindness (trachomatis). Sexually transmitted diseases caused by C. trachomatis include nongonococcal urethritis, cervicitis, salpingitis, epididymitis, proctitis and Lymphogranuloma venereum. Infections are often asymptomatic. Thus, infected individuals may unknowingly transmit chlamydial disease to others. Coinfection with C. trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is common, with multiple chlamydial infections of the upper respiratory tract occurring primarily in newborns exposed at parturition through an infected birth canal. Approximately 10-20% of such infants develop pneumonia and 50% develop inclusion conjunctivitis. In adults, eye disease is often transmitted by the hands from genital secretions or from eye secretion of infected babies. Isolation in tissue culture remains the reference method for diagnosis of chlamydial infection, especially when testing individuals under the age of 13 years. The usefulness of serological tests depends on the site of infection, duration of disease, infecting serovars and pre-vious exposure to chlamydial antigens. Because C. trachomatis is ubiquitous, there is a high prevalence of antibodies in sexually active populations. Antibodies may persist even after treatment, making assessment of a single IgG titer difficult. Consequently, serological diag-nosis is seldom used to diagnose active, superficial genital tract infections.



In 2018, more than four million people in the US were diagnosed with chlamydia, but many cases are not reported because many people never show symptoms. And this is the main reason why chlamydia testing is so important. 

Chlamydia tests can show what your lack of symptoms doesn't. If you think you may be at risk of having chlamydia, then it's time to take action. 

Maintaining your sexual health and wellness is imperative for both you and your partner's overall health. Chlamydia testing is your first step. 

Keep reading this guide to find out everything you need to know about chlamydia and chlamydia testing. 

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in America and especially common in young adults.

Chlamydia often affects young women, but it also occurs in men and people of all age groups. Chlamydia can easily be treated with antibiotics but, left untreated, can lead to serious health complications in the future.

Risk factors for Chlamydia

Certain lifestyle habits and age groups put you at a higher risk of getting chlamydia. Chlamydia risk factors include:

  • Being sexually active before the age of 25
  • Having multiple sex partners
  • Having unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex
  • Having a history of other sexually transmitted diseases.

What Causes Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is caused by the trachomatis bacterium and usually spread through oral, anal, and vaginal sex.

If you're pregnant, you can also spread chlamydia to your newborn during delivery. In infants, chlamydia can cause serious eye infections and pneumonia.

Signs and Symptoms of Chlamydia

Chlamydia is often known as a silent infection because many times, infected people are completely asymptomatic. Also, in the early stages, chlamydia often causes few to no symptoms. When chlamydia does cause symptoms, they're so mild, and it's all too easy to dismiss them as something else.

Symptoms of chlamydia include:

  • Painful urination
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Discharge from the penis
  • Pain during sex for women
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods
  • Testicular pain

You can also get chlamydia in your rectum and may experience rectal pain, bleeding, or discharge. In addition, chlamydia can cause eye infections if your eyes come into contact with infected bodily fluids.

Complications of Chlamydia

Untreated chlamydia puts you at risk for many complications.

When you have chlamydia, you're at more risk of developing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which is an infection in your uterus and fallopian tubes.

PID can cause pelvic pain, fever, and severe infections that may require hospitalization. PID can cause damage to your fallopian tubes, ovaries, uterus, and cervix.

Chlamydia in men can cause an infection near the testicles called epididymitis—this type of infection results in a fever along with scrotal swelling and pain.

Prostate gland infections can also occur. Sometimes chlamydia spreads to the prostate gland and causes fever, chills, low back pain, and painful urination.

Chlamydia infections can also cause infertility and infections in newborns. Chlamydia also causes ectopic pregnancies. This type of pregnancy occurs when the egg grows outside of the uterus, usually in your fallopian tube. If your fallopian tubes burst, it can cause life-threatening complications.

What Tests Are Done to Diagnose Chlamydia

If you think you may have chlamydia, then you should make an appointment to see your doctor. Your doctor will ask you things like:

  • When did your symptoms begin?
  • Does anything make them worse?
  • Is there anything that relieves your symptoms?
  • What medications do you take daily?

Your doctor will also need to know details about your sex life. You'll be asked how many sexual partners you have or if you have a new sexual partner, as well as if you use condoms consistently.

Testing for chlamydia is pretty easy and usually includes a urine test and, and for women a swab of your cervix. Your doctor will insert a swab into the end of your penis to take a sample for men.

Lab Tests For Chlamydia

There are different lab tests available for chlamydia your doctor will order, depending on your symptoms.

One of the most common tests is the Chlamydia Urine Test. This test will detect the chlamydia trachomatis bacteria. Before taking this test, you shouldn't urinate at least one hour before collecting your urine.

Often, your doctor will order a combined Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Urine Test as the two have similar symptoms. This test works the same way by detecting either the chlamydia trachomatis bacteria or the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria that causes gonorrhea.

Depending on your medical history and current medical conditions, your doctor may order a Chlamydia/Chlamydophila Ab Pnl 3 (IgG, IgA, IgM) antibody test to detect the species of chlamydia that can cause pneumonia.

Chlamydia can also cause other infections in the eye, urinary tract, and respiratory tract. Your doctor also may order a Chlamydia Trachomatis Antibody (IgM) if you're at risk.

More lab testing for STDs includes a Basic STD Panel, which tests for chlamydia, gonorrhea, and herpes. You can also get a Comprehensive STD Panel that tests syphilis, herpes, gonorrhea, hepatitis, and chlamydia.

FAQs About Chlamydia

Frequently asked questions about chlamydia usually start with how it's spread. You can get chlamydia by having any sexual contact where you exchange body fluids with someone that has chlamydia.

Wondering how you can reduce your risk of getting chlamydia? If you're sexually active, you can greatly reduce your risk by:

  • Being in a monogamous relationship, and you both get tested   
  • Using latex condoms correctly each time you have sex

Are you pregnant and wondering how chlamydia can affect your baby? Chlamydia can pass to your baby from your vaginal secretions during delivery. This can cause lung or eye infections. If you have chlamydia, you're also more likely to deliver your baby early.

Chlamydia Testing at Ulta Lab Tests

Ulta Lab Tests offers highly accurate and reliable tests which allow you to make informed decisions about your health. Ulta Lab Tests gives you:

  • Secure and confidential results
  • No need for health insurance
  • No need for a physician's referral
  • Affordable pricing
  • A 100 percent satisfaction guarantee

If you order your Chlamydia testing today, your results will be provided to you within 24 to 48 hours in most cases.

Take control of your health and with Ulta Lab Tests.

Chlamydia is a common STD (or sexually transmitted disease), and both men and women can get infected. If left untreated, it is capable of causing serious and permanent damage to the reproductive system of a woman and possible affect her ability to conceive. In simple terms, untreated chlamydia can make it extremely difficult or almost impossible for a woman to get pregnant. It can also lead to a potentially fatal ectopic pregnancy (a term used for pregnancy occurring outside the womb). The good news is that it is curable.

How Does It Spread?

You can get chlamydia through oral, anal, or vaginal sex with someone suffering from it. Keep in mind that you can get chlamydia from a male partner, even if there is no ejaculation. Also, you can get infected again if you have had this disease previously and it was successfully treated. It can happen to you if you indulge in unprotected sex with a person suffering from chlamydia. Pregnant women can give chlamydia to their babies during childbirth.

Tips for Reducing the Risk of Chlamydia

The only way of avoiding any STD is to not engage in oral, anal, or vaginal sex. However, there are certain things you can do as a sexually active individual to lower the chances of catching chlamydia.

  • Maintaining a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with someone who has been tested for STDs with negative test results.
  • Use latex condoms correctly whenever you engage in sex.

What Is My Risk of Getting Chlamydia?

Chlamydia can infect anyone who engages in unprotected sex, be it oral, anal or vaginal. However, sexually active young people are at higher risk due to various biological factors and behaviors that are common among young people. Men who are bisexual, gay, or who otherwise have sex with men can also contact chlamydia as it spreads through anal and oral sex.

You should have a frank and open discussion with your healthcare provider. You should ask them whether you need to get tested for chlamydia as well as other STDs. It is recommended that women get tested for chlamydia each year if they are either younger than 25 years and sexually active, or they are older than 25 and have a sex partner with STDs or if they have multiple sex partners or a new sex partner. Pregnant women, bisexual men, and gay men should also get tested for chlamydia.

Effect of Chlamydia on Baby – Pregnant Women

If you are a woman suffering from chlamydia and you’re pregnant, it is possible to pass this infection to your newborn baby during the delivery. It might cause pneumonia or eye infection to your newborn. If you suffer from chlamydia, it’s also more likely for you to deliver the baby too early. In case you’re pregnant, it’s important to get tested for chlamydia at the very first prenatal visit. The right way to prevent any health problems is regular testing and treatment.

Checking for Chlamydia

Most people do not show any symptoms of chlamydia, even when they are infected. It is also possible that the symptoms do not appear for several weeks after having sex with someone who is already infected. Do not forget that chlamydia can damage your reproductive system even if there are no symptoms.

Symptoms for Women May Include:

  • Abnormal discharge from the vagina
  • A sensation of burning when urinating

Symptoms for Men Might Include:

  • A discharge from the penis
  • A sensation of burning when urinating
  • Swelling and pain in the testicles (one or both) – less common

Chlamydia infection can also happen in the rectum for both men and women. The infection can reach the rectum due to receptor anal sex or from another infected site. There are typically no symptoms for the anal infection, but it can lead to bleeding, discharge as well as rectal pain.

In case you show any of these symptoms, or in case your partner shows symptoms of an STD or has an STD, it is important to ask your doctor to examine you. Common STD symptoms include burning sensation when urinating, smelly discharge, bleeding between periods, or an unusual sore.

Chlamydia Testing by Doctor

Chlamydia can be diagnosed with laboratory tests. Testing for chlamydia may be done with a urine sample or by a swab sample from a woman’s vagina.

Cure for Chlamydia

It is possible to cure chlamydia with the right treatment. However, it is important to keep in mind that you need to take all the medications prescribed by the doctor in order to cure the infection. When you follow the prescription given by your doctor, the medication will stop the infection and may also prevent you from experiencing any complications at a later date. It is important never to share chlamydia medication with anyone else.

It is not uncommon to have a repeat chlamydia infection. It is recommended to get tested again for chlamydia after about three months once your treatment course is over. The testing should be done even when your sex partner has been treated.

How long do you have to wait for sex again after getting treatment for chlamydia?

It is recommended not to have sex until the treatment has been completed for you as well as your sex partner. In case only a single dose of medication has been prescribed by the doctor, it is recommended to wait for at least seven days after taking the prescribed medication before indulging in sex. In case the doctor has prescribed a course of medication for seven days, it is recommended to wait for sex until the course has been completed.

The Risks of Not Getting Treated for Chlamydia

Often, the damage caused by chlamydia goes unnoticed. However, ignoring it can lead to serious health problems.

Women should know that untreated chlamydia infection can spread to their uterus as well as fallopian tubes. Fallopian tubes carry the fertilized eggs to the uterus from your ovaries. It can also cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). PID often has no symptoms but may cause pelvic and abdominal pain in some women. Even when you don’t experience any symptoms initially, keep in mind that PID can cause permanent damage to your reproductive system. It can also lead to other consequences, including chronic pelvic pain, eco-topic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus that can be potentially deadly), and not being able to get pregnant.

Men usually do not experience any health problems due to chlamydia. There are times when the infection reaches the tube carrying the sperm from the testicles, and that might cause fever and pain. Rarely, a man is unable to have children due to chlamydia.

Untreated chlamydia also increases the chances of giving or getting HIV (AIDS virus).

More Information about Chlamydia:

Resources – STD information and referrals to STD Clinics

CDC-INFO

1-800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)

TTY: 1-888-232-6348

CDC National Prevention Information Network (NPIN)

P.O. Box 6003

Rockville, MD 20849-6003

E-mail: npin-info@cdc.gov

American Sexual Health Association (ASHA)

P.O. Box 13827

Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-3827

919-361-8488

Content source: Division of STD Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Order a Chlamydia Test:

https://www.ultalabtests.com/test/Chlamydia