STD - Basic Most Popular

The STD - Basic panel contains 3 tests with 5 biomarkers.

Brief Description: The STD Basic panel is a curated selection of tests aimed at detecting some of the most common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). These tests employ various laboratory techniques to identify the presence of specific pathogens or the body's immune response to them. By providing insights into an individual's sexual health status, this panel plays a pivotal role in early detection, treatment, and prevention of further transmission of these infections.

Collection Method: Blood Draw and Urine Collection

Specimen Type: Blood Serum and Urine

Test Preparation: Urine specimens: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

When and Why the STD Basic Panel May Be Ordered

The STD Basic panel may be ordered when an individual presents with symptoms consistent with an STD, which might include unusual discharge, pain during intercourse, itching, or sores in the genital area. However, many STDs can be asymptomatic, especially in their initial stages. Thus, it's not uncommon for this panel to be ordered as part of routine screening, especially for sexually active individuals or those with multiple sexual partners. Regular testing is crucial because early detection and treatment can prevent complications and potential transmission to partners.

What the STD Basic Panel Checks For

Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhea RNA, TMA: This test employs transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) to detect the RNA of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea, pathogens responsible for chlamydia and gonorrhea infections respectively. Both are common bacterial STDs that can lead to serious reproductive health issues if left untreated.

Herpes Simplex Virus 1/2 IgG Type Specific Antibodies: This test identifies antibodies the body produces in response to Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV). Specifically, it differentiates between HSV-1, primarily causing oral herpes, and HSV-2, responsible for genital herpes.

RPR with Reflex to Titer: Rapid plasma reagin (RPR) is a screening test for syphilis. If the RPR test is reactive, a "reflex to titer" is performed to measure the amount of reagin in the blood, providing an indication of the disease's activity.

From Basic to Comprehensive

While the STD Basic panel offers essential insights into common sexually transmitted infections, for a more holistic understanding of one's sexual health, the STD Comprehensive panel is recommended. In addition to the tests present in the Basic panel, the Comprehensive panel also includes the "Hepatitis Panel, General," which screens for various types of hepatitis, a group of viral infections affecting the liver. Early detection of hepatitis can lead to prompt treatment and reduce the risk of liver-related complications.

Conditions or Diseases the STD Basic Panel Checks For

The STD Basic panel screens for:

  • Chlamydia: A bacterial infection that can damage female reproductive organs if left untreated.

  • Gonorrhea: Another bacterial infection that can cause complications in both men and women.

  • Herpes (Type 1 and 2): Viral infections that cause recurring sores and blisters in the infected region.

  • Syphilis: A bacterial infection that can affect multiple organs over different stages and can be severe if not treated early.

How Healthcare Professionals Use the STD Basic Panel Results

Healthcare professionals employ the results of the STD Basic panel to diagnose the presence or absence of specific sexually transmitted infections. A positive result typically leads to a recommended course of treatment, which might involve antibiotics for bacterial infections or antivirals for herpes. Additionally, results guide counseling on preventing transmission, potential complications, and the importance of notifying and testing of sexual partners.

Understanding one's sexual health is of paramount importance, not just for personal well-being but also for the health of current and future partners. The STD Basic panel provides critical insights into several prevalent sexually transmitted infections, ensuring early detection and intervention. By promoting informed choices and timely medical care, such screenings contribute significantly to broader public health efforts aimed at controlling and reducing the spread of STDs.

IMPORTANT

A positive RPR screen must be followed by a specific treponemal antibody test (e.g., FTA-ABS):

A positive result on the second method confirms the screening result and the affected person is diagnosed with syphilis.

A negative result on the treponemal test may mean that the initial RPR test was falsely positive. Further testing and investigation may be done to determine the cause of the false positive.

Limitations

False-positive results have been associated in patients with infections, pregnancy, autoimmune disease, old age, Gaucher disease, and malignancy.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: ChlamydiaNeisseria gonorrhoeae RNA TMA, CT/GC APTIMA®, CT/GC TMA, CT/NG APTIMA®, CT/NG TMA, Hologic

Chlamydia Trachomatis

This test is looking for evidence of infection by the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis. Chlamydia is the most common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) in the United States. About 75% of infected women and 50% of infected men have no symptoms; some may experience only mild symptoms. For women, symptoms, if they occur, include bleeding between menstrual periods and after sexual intercourse, abdominal pain, painful intercourse, and an abnormal vaginal discharge. For men, symptoms include pus or milky discharge from the penis and inflammation of the prostate (prostatitis) or of the rectal area (proctitis). Both sexes can experience painful or frequent urination.

Neisseria Gonorrhoeae

The test is looking for presence of the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that more than 700,000 people in the U.S. get new gonorrheal infections each year. While many men with gonorrhea will experience symptoms, most women do not, or will mistake gonorrhea symptoms for a bladder or other vaginal infection. For men, symptoms usually appear within 2 to 5 days of infection but can take up to 30 days. Women who experience symptoms usually do so within 10 days of infection.

Also known as: Herpes Simplex Virus 12 IgG TypeSpecific Antibodies HerpeSelect

Hsv 1 IgG Type Specific

Herpes simplex virus testing is performed to identify an acute herpes infection or to detect herpes antibodies, an indication of a previous exposure to herpes. One of the most common viral infections, herpes simplex virus (HSV) exists as two main types, HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both types are contagious and periodically cause small fever blisters (vesicles) that break to form open lesions. HSV-1 primarily causes blisters or "cold sores" around the oral cavity and mouth, while HSV-2 usually causes lesions around the genital area; however, either one can affect the oral or genital area.

Hsv 2 IgG Type Specific

Herpes simplex virus testing is performed to identify an acute herpes infection or to detect herpes antibodies, an indication of a previous exposure to herpes. One of the most common viral infections, herpes simplex virus (HSV) exists as two main types, HSV-1 and HSV-2. Both types are contagious and periodically cause small fever blisters (vesicles) that break to form open lesions. HSV-1 primarily causes blisters or "cold sores" around the oral cavity and mouth, while HSV-2 usually causes lesions around the genital area; however, either one can affect the oral or genital area.

Also known as: RPR Monitor with Reflex to Titer, Syphilis

Rpr (Monitor)

RPR (rapid plasma reagin) is a screening test for syphilis. It looks for antibodies that are present in the blood of people who have the disease.
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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