Men's Health Tests

Men’s health lab tests are essential to understanding your health and getting ahead of many potential male issues. And men’s health lab tests can offer a deeper understanding of what’s going on inside your body and how it is performing. 

This section offers lab tests for men to understand their hormone balance, energy, performance, cardiovascular health, and wellness. Take control of your health today and order your men’s health tests from Ulta Lab Tests!


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17-hydroxyprogesterone is elevated in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). CAH is a group of autosomal recessive diseases characterized by a deficiency of cortisol and an excess of ACTH concentration. 17-hydroxyprogesterone is also useful in monitoring cortisol replacement therapy and in evaluating infertility and adrenal and ovarian neoplasms.

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Measurement of the levels of bilirubin is used in the diagnosis and treatment of liver, hemolytic, hematologic, and metabolic disorders, including hepatitis and gall bladder obstruction. The assessment of direct bilirubin is helpful in the differentiation of hepatic disorders. The increase in total bilirubin associated with obstructive jaundice is primarily due to the direct (conjugated) fraction. Both direct and indirect bilirubin are increased in the serum with hepatitis.

Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) Useful in predicting risk for cardiovascular disease.



A Complete Blood Count (CBC) Panel is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia and inflammatory processes.

A CBC blood test includes the following biomarkers: WBC, RBC, Hemoglobin, Hematocrit, MCV, MCH, MCHC, RDW, Platelet count, Neutrophils, Lymphs, Monocytes, Eos, Basos, Neutrophils (Absolute), Lymphs (Absolute), Monocytes(Absolute), Eos (Absolute), Basos (Absolute), Immature Granulocytes, Immature Grans (Abs)


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Cortisol is increased in Cushing's Disease and decreased in Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency). Patient needs to have the specimen collected between 7 a.m.-9 a.m.


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Cortisol is increased in Cushing's Disease and decreased in Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency).

Culture, Urine, Routine 

Test Details

IMPORTANT- this is a REFLEX test..... ADDITIONAL CHARGES WILL BE APPLIED IF TEST IS POSITIVE.

If culture is positive, CPT code(s): 87088 (each isolate) will be added with an additional charge.  Identification will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 87077 or 87140 or 87143 or 87147 or 87149).

Antibiotic susceptibilities are only performed when appropriate (CPT code(s): 87181 or 87184 or 87185 or 87186).

  • ORG ID 1. $ 12.45 
  • ORG ID 2. $ 23.95 
  • PRESUMPTIVE ID 1. $ 12.45 
  • PRESUMPTIVE ID 2. $ 23.95 
  • SUSC-1  $14.95 
  • SUSC-2  $28.95
     

Clinical Significance

Culture, Urine, Routine - This culture is designed to quantitate the growth of significant bacteria when collected by the Clean Catch Guidelines or from indwelling catheters.  Quantitative culturing of urine is an established tool to differentiate significant bacteruria from contamination introduced during voiding. This test has a reference range of less than 1,000 bacteria per mL. More than 95% of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) are attributed to a single organism. Infecting organisms are usually present at greater that 100,000 per mL, but a lower density may be clinically important. In cases of UTI where more than one organism is present, the predominant organism is usually significant and others are probably urethral or collection contaminants. When multiple organisms are isolated from patients with indwelling catheters, UTI is doubtful and colonization likely.


Intrauterine or congenital CMV infections occur in 0.5 to 2.2% of all live births. Symptomatic congenital infections usually occur in infants born to nonimmune mothers who have primary infections during pregnancy. Latency and reactivation of CMV influence the interpretation of serological results. A single positive CMV IgG result is and indication of present or past infection. The presence of CMV IgM suggests a recent CMV exposure but does not differentiate between primary infection and reactivation.

DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.


DHT is a potent androgen derived from testosterone via 5-alpha-reductase activity. 5-alpha-reductase deficiency results in incompletely virilized males (phenotypic females). This diagnosis is supported by an elevated ratio of testosterone to DHT.

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Antibody Panel

Includes: Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgM), Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgG), Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

Clinical Significance: Primary infection by EBV causes infectious mononucleosis, usually a self-limiting disease in children and young adults. Infection with EBV can cause lymphoproliferative disorders including tumors. VCA-IgM is typically detectable at clinical presentation, then declines to undetectable levels within a month in young children and within 3 months in other individuals. VCA-IgG is typically detectable at clinical presentation, and persists for life. EBNA IgG typically appears during convalescence (3-4 months after clinical presentation) and remains detectable for life.

EBV-VCA IgG/IgM (viral capsid antigen): A positive IgG means you’ve had or currently have the infection; A positive IgM means the virus has been reactivated.

EBV-EBNA IgG (nuclear antigen): A positive test result is usually associated with past infections.

Reference Range(s)

Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgM)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <36.00 Negative
  • 36.00-43.99Equivocal
  • >43.99Positive


Epstein-Barr Virus VCA Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive


Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) Antibody (IgG)

U/mLInterpretation

  • <18.00 Negative
  • 18.00-21.99Equivocal
  • >21.99Positive

Alternative Name(s)

EBV Comprehensive,Infectious Mononucleosis Panel

 




Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Hormone Panel

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS [ 90567 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Prolactin [ 746 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Hormone Panel 3

  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay [ 402 ]
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS [ 90567 ]
  • Estradiol [ 4021 ]
  • FSH and LH [ 7137 ]
  • IGF-I, LC/MS [ 16293 ]
  • Pregnenolone, LC/MS/MS [ 31493 ]
  • Prolactin [ 746 ]
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin [ 37073 ]

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel 2

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • Prolactin 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

Erectile Dysfunction (ED) Plus Panel 3

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay 
  • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), LC/MS/MS
  • Estradiol
  • FSH and LH 
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • IGF-I, LC/MS 
  • Pregnenolone, LC/MS/MS
  • Prolactin 
  • PSA Total 
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Total And Free And Sex Hormone Binding Globulin
  • TSH
  • Urinalysis (UA), Complete

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Measuring the circulating levels of estradiol is important for assessing the ovarian function and monitoring follicular development for assisted reproduction protocols. Estradiol plays an essential role throughout the human menstrual cycle. Elevated estradiol levels in females may also result from primary or secondary ovarian hyperfunction. Very high estradiol levels are found during the induction of ovulation for assisted reproduction therapy or in pregnancy. Decreased estradiol levels in females may result from either lack of ovarian synthesis (primary ovarian hypofunction and menopause) or a lesion in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis (secondary ovarian hypofunction). Elevated estradiol levels in males may be due to increased aromatization of androgens, resulting in gynecomastia.

IMPORTANT - Note this Estradiol test is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute in Estradiol, Ultrasensitive LC/MS/MS - #30289 at an additional charge of $34



Estrogens are secreted by the gonads, adrenal glands, and placenta. Total estrogens provide an overall picture of estrogen status for men and women.


When a male’s body does not produce enough testosterone, the condition is diagnosed as low testosterone, or “low T.” Testosterone is the primary androgen, or sex hormone, for men, and is produced mainly by the testicles. Testosterone maintains male physical characteristics, such as muscle mass and facial hair. It’s also responsible for sex drive, bone health, and overall red blood cell supply. The female body also produces testosterone in significantly smaller quantities. This piece will discuss the issue of low testosterone in adult men.

Testosterone production in the testicles is controlled by the pituitary gland, which is a tiny gland at the base of the brain. There are several reasons for low T, including testicular disease or failure (primary hypogonadism) or a disease or failure of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland (secondary hypogonadism).

Men tend to feel a natural decline in their testosterone level around the age of thirty. This normal stage of aging usually doesn’t cause significant issues. Low T, on its own, is not considered a disease. Low T, by itself, is not an indication that one needs to supplement testosterone with patches or injections. Diagnosing testosterone deficiency in adult males can be done with a combination of clinical evaluation and laboratory testing.

There are numerous factors, aside from aging, that can contribute to low T. Some causes of low T are conditions that men deal with later in their life, such as obesity. Other causes can be related to conditions like Klinefelter syndrome, that individuals are born with, although these conditions are much rarer.

Other things that can cause low testosterone can include:

  • Chronic diseases like HIV, liver disease, Type 2 diabetes, autoimmune diseases, or kidney disease
  • Trauma or injury to the testicles
  • Treating cancer by removing the testicles
  • Radiation or chemotherapy
  • Narcotic pain medications or antidepressants

The symptoms of low T can be treated with hormone replacement therapy. There are, however, risks with this treatment, and it may not be recommended for every man that suffers from low T.

Symptoms of Low T

There are numerous symptoms and signs of low T, that can vary dramatically from one man to another. Some of them are directly related to testosterone levels, like:

  • Reduced hair on the body and face
  • Extremely small testicles
  • Delayed or incomplete sexual development
  • Symptoms that could suggest a testosterone deficiency:
  • Overall low sex drive
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Lowered number of spontaneous erections
  • Larger breasts
  • Infertility

Some symptoms are less specific, that could be caused by a variety of conditions, such as:

  • Decreased bone mass
  • Decreased lean muscle mass
  • Depressions
  • Mood changes
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Obesity
  • Irritability
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Poor memory
  • Reduced focus
  • Tests

The process of diagnosing low T starts with listing out a history of the individual’s symptoms, as well as a physical exam. Then, a series of laboratory tests should be scheduled to evaluate testosterone levels. The American Urological Association and The Endocrine Society both recommend utilizing both a clinical exam and laboratory tests to diagnose low T.

It’s important to note that one should not screen for low T in men without existing signs and symptoms. There are extra laboratory tests that can be used to find out the causes of low T, as well as to monitor individuals who are receiving supplemental hormones.

Lab Tests

Testosterone Levels – This is the single most important lab test for determining that testosterone levels are low. Blood should be taken first thing in the morning to help compensate for daily variations. The level should also be sampled on at least two separate days in order to confirm the results. Around thirty percent of men who initially test with low T levels have normal levels when they are retested. Testosterone can also be measured as a method to monitor the success of treatment.

Two-thirds of testosterone circulates in the blood attached to sex hormone binding globulin, and a little less than one-third of it circulates while bound to albumin. Less than four percent of it circulates as free testosterone in the blood. The bio-available fraction of testosterone is composed of the free plus the albumin-bound testosterone, and these can act on target tissues. Often, measuring the total testosterone will provide your medical team with enough information. In some cases, though, if the level of SHBG is not normal, it may be necessary to test for the free or bioavailable testosterone, as it will reflect an existing medical condition far more accurately.

The appropriate ranges for testosterone levels in adult men naturally decrease with age. Although lab test accuracy has gotten significantly better in the last 20-30 years, results can vary from one lab to another due to differences in equipment and techniques. It’s important to use the range provided by the performing laboratory to determine if your results are within a normal range.

It’s worth recognizing that even when men are younger, the range references the center of the population, so a percentage of the population will have a lower testosterone level than the reference number listed. It’s also important to consider whether older men should have their own specific reference range for testosterone, as the current range is based only on the testosterone levels of younger men. To summarize, men should speak with their healthcare provider about what testosterone test results mean.

Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH) – FSH is connected to sperm production, LH stimulates testosterone production overall. These tests are often used to help tell the difference between Low T that is caused by a testicular issue and low T that is caused by a problem that began in the hypothalamus or pituitary gland.

If testosterone is low, and LH and FSH levels are high, the source of Low T may originate in the testicles. When FSH and LH are normal or low, it can demonstrate that the source of low T is a pituitary issue. Normal FSH and LH are usually seen with low T related to age.

Prolactin – This is a pituitary hormone. This is what is tested if the pituitary gland could be the reason for low T. High prolactin levels can also indicate pituitary issues like a tumor. High prolactin can interfere with the function of the testicles.

Several tests can be run for men that are going through testosterone therapy to monitor side effects, including:

Hemoglobin – This should be watched for an increase in red blood cells, called polycythemia. This can be a side effect of hormone replacement therapy, which can lead to vascular issues such as blood clots.

Lipid Panel – This helps check for unhealthy lipid levels.

PSA – to check for prostate cancer