Testosterone, Free, Bioavailable and Total, LC/MS/MS Most Popular

The Testosterone, Free, Bioavailable and Total, LC/MS/MS test contains 1 test with 5 biomarkers.

Brief Description: The Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total test is a comprehensive assessment of testosterone levels in the body. It measures the total amount of testosterone, as well as the amount of testosterone that is free (unbound) and bioavailable (able to exert physiological effects).

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required 

When and Why a Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total Test may be Ordered

A Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total test may be ordered in the following situations:

  1. Evaluation of Hormonal Imbalances: It is commonly used to assess testosterone levels in individuals experiencing symptoms related to hormonal imbalances, such as low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, infertility, or abnormal menstrual cycles.

  2. Diagnosis of Hypogonadism: Hypogonadism is a condition characterized by insufficient testosterone production. The test helps determine if low testosterone levels are contributing to symptoms like fatigue, muscle weakness, and mood changes.

  3. Monitoring Hormone Replacement Therapy: In individuals undergoing testosterone replacement therapy, the test is used to monitor and adjust treatment dosage to achieve optimal testosterone levels.

What a Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total Test checks for

The Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total test checks for:

  1. Total Testosterone: It measures the overall amount of testosterone in the bloodstream, including both free and bound testosterone.

  2. Free Testosterone: This component measures the portion of testosterone that is not bound to proteins and is available for immediate use by the body.

  3. Bioavailable Testosterone: It measures the combined levels of free testosterone and testosterone that is loosely bound to proteins, providing a more accurate representation of the biologically active testosterone.

Other Lab Tests Ordered alongside a Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total Test

This comprehensive assessment of testosterone levels is important in diagnosing and managing conditions related to hormonal imbalances, such as hypogonadism, infertility, and certain endocrine disorders. When this test is ordered, it's often part of a broader evaluation of hormonal health. Here are some tests commonly ordered alongside it:

  1. Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH):

    • Purpose: These hormones regulate the function of the gonads and testosterone production.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To differentiate between primary (testicular) and secondary (pituitary) causes of testosterone imbalances. Elevated LH and FSH levels can indicate primary hypogonadism, while low levels might suggest a pituitary problem.
  2. Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG):

    • Purpose: SHBG binds to sex hormones in the blood.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To understand the levels of bioavailable hormones. SHBG levels affect the amount of free and bioavailable testosterone.
  3. Estradiol:

    • Purpose: A form of estrogen that is important in both men and women.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess the balance between testosterone and estrogen, particularly in men, as excess conversion of testosterone to estradiol can occur in some conditions.
  4. Prolactin:

    • Purpose: Prolactin is a hormone that can affect testosterone levels and sexual function.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Elevated prolactin can interfere with testosterone production and signal pituitary disorders.
  5. Complete Blood Count (CBC):

    • Purpose: To provide a general overview of health.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To detect conditions like anemia, which can sometimes be related to hormonal imbalances.
  6. Liver Function Test:

    • Purpose: To assess liver health.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Liver diseases can affect hormone metabolism, including that of testosterone.
  7. Kidney Function Test:

    • Purpose: To evaluate kidney function.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Kidney disease can influence overall health, including hormonal balances.
  8. DHEA-Sulfate (DHEA-S) Test:

    • Purpose: DHEA-S is an androgen precursor produced by the adrenal glands.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To evaluate adrenal function and the balance of androgens, which can affect or be affected by testosterone levels.

These tests, when ordered alongside a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test, provide a comprehensive view of an individual's hormonal status and are critical for diagnosing, managing, and monitoring conditions related to hormonal imbalances and reproductive health. The specific combination of tests will depend on the individual’s symptoms, sex, and medical history.

Conditions or Diseases Requiring a Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total Test

A Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total test is commonly ordered for the evaluation of:

  1. Hypogonadism: Low testosterone levels due to primary testicular failure or secondary to hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction.

  2. Andropause: Age-related decline in testosterone levels in men, leading to symptoms like decreased libido, fatigue, and mood changes.

  3. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): Elevated testosterone levels in women, contributing to symptoms such as irregular menstrual cycles, acne, and excessive hair growth.

  4. Infertility: Testosterone assessment is important in the evaluation of male infertility, as low levels may impact sperm production and quality.

Utilization of Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total Test Results by Health Care Providers

Health care providers utilize the results of a Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total test to:

  1. Diagnose Hormonal Disorders: Abnormal testosterone levels can help diagnose conditions such as hypogonadism, PCOS, or andropause, and guide appropriate treatment.

  2. Monitor Hormone Replacement Therapy: Regular testing helps determine the effectiveness of testosterone replacement therapy and ensures testosterone levels are within the desired range.

  3. Guide Treatment Decisions: The results aid in developing individualized treatment plans, including hormone therapy, lifestyle modifications, or further investigations to address the underlying causes of testosterone imbalances.

It's important to note that the interpretation of testosterone levels should consider factors such as age, sex, and the individual's specific clinical context to make accurate diagnoses and treatment decisions. A comprehensive assessment by a qualified health care provider is necessary for proper interpretation and management.

Most Common Questions About the Testosterone, Free, Bioavalable, and Total test:

Understanding the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total Test

What is the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

The Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test is a blood test that measures the levels of different forms of testosterone in your body. This includes total testosterone (the overall amount in your body), free testosterone (the amount not bound to proteins and freely circulating), and bioavailable testosterone (the amount available to tissues, including both free testosterone and testosterone loosely bound to albumin).

Why is the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test performed?

This test is typically ordered to assess the testosterone level in men who may have low testosterone symptoms like fatigue, low sex drive, and erectile dysfunction. It can also help to evaluate the status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male patients, assist in the diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome in women, and monitor conditions like hypogonadism, hypergonadism, and certain forms of cancer.

Testosterone and Its Role in the Body

What is the role of testosterone in the body? Testosterone is a hormone that plays a vital role in the body. In men, it regulates sex drive (libido), bone mass, fat distribution, muscle mass and strength, and the production of red blood cells and sperm. In women, testosterone is involved in bone strength, muscle mass, and mood stability.

Why are there different types of testosterone?

Testosterone in the body exists in three forms: free, bound to sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and bound to albumin. The free and albumin-bound forms are considered bioavailable as they can readily enter cells and bring about their actions, while the SHBG-bound form is largely biologically inactive.

Interpreting Test Results

What do the results of a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test mean?

The results provide information about the levels of testosterone in the blood. Normal ranges vary depending on age, sex, and individual health. Low levels may suggest hypogonadism in men or ovarian failure in women, while high levels may indicate conditions like testicular tumors in men or polycystic ovary syndrome in women.

What does it mean if my testosterone levels are high in the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

High testosterone levels can indicate several conditions. In men, it could suggest testicular or adrenal tumors, while in women, it might indicate polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or other ovarian issues.

What does it mean if my testosterone levels are low in the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Low testosterone levels in men could suggest hypogonadism, a condition where the body produces insufficient sex hormones. In women, low levels might suggest ovarian failure or pituitary disorders.

Testosterone Levels and Health Implications

What health implications are associated with abnormal testosterone levels?

Abnormal testosterone levels can have various health implications. High levels can lead to aggressiveness, acne, and fertility issues in both men and women. Low levels can cause low libido, fatigue, depression, and in severe cases, osteoporosis.

How are conditions caused by abnormal testosterone levels treated?

Treatment varies depending on the underlying cause. For low levels, testosterone replacement therapy might be used, while for high levels, medications to reduce testosterone, surgery, or radiation might be necessary.

Can lifestyle factors affect testosterone levels?

Yes, lifestyle factors can significantly impact testosterone levels. These include diet, exercise, sleep, and stress. Obesity can lower testosterone levels, while regular exercise can help increase them.

The Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total Test in Medical Practice

Why is the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test important in diagnosing conditions like hypogonadism?

This test helps determine if a person's symptoms are due to low testosterone levels, a key characteristic of hypogonadism. Identifying and addressing low testosterone can significantly improve quality of life for people with this condition.

How often should I get a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

The frequency of testing depends on your health status, symptoms, and medical advice. If you're undergoing treatment for low or high testosterone, regular testing might be recommended to monitor your condition.

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test diagnose conditions in women?

Yes, while testosterone is often associated with men, it plays essential roles in women's bodies too. High testosterone levels in women can signal conditions like PCOS, while low levels might suggest pituitary disorders or ovarian failure.

Further Insights into the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total Test

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test help diagnose fertility issues?

Yes, testosterone plays a crucial role in sperm production in men, so low levels might contribute to infertility. In women, high testosterone levels can be a sign of PCOS, a common cause of infertility.

Why might an athlete undergo a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Athletes might undergo this test as part of anti-doping measures, as high testosterone levels can suggest the use of performance-enhancing substances.

What are the potential risks of testosterone therapy?

While testosterone therapy can be beneficial for those with low levels, it also carries risks such as an increased likelihood of sleep apnea, acne, an enlarged prostate, and elevated red blood cell count.

How does age affect testosterone levels as seen in the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Testosterone levels naturally decrease with age in men, starting around middle age. This can lead to symptoms of low testosterone, but it's a normal part of aging.

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test assist in diagnosing mood disorders?

Research suggests there might be a link between low testosterone levels and mood disorders like depression in men. However, this test alone cannot diagnose a mood disorder.

What other tests might be ordered alongside the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Your healthcare provider might order other tests like a complete blood count (CBC), metabolic panel, prolactin test, and/or luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) tests to gain a fuller picture of your hormonal health.

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test assist in assessing risk for cardiovascular disease?

Research is ongoing, but some studies suggest that low testosterone levels might be linked with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in men.

How does obesity impact the results of a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Obesity can lower testosterone levels in both men and women. This is because body fat contains aromatase, an enzyme that converts testosterone into estrogen, the primary female sex hormone.

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test diagnose prostate cancer?

No, this test alone cannot diagnose prostate cancer. While testosterone can promote the growth of prostate cancer, men with normal testosterone levels can still develop prostate cancer.

How does alcohol consumption affect the results of a Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test?

Chronic heavy drinking can lead to lower testosterone levels in men, potentially causing symptoms of low testosterone.

Can the Testosterone Free, Bioavailable, and Total test assist in diagnosing thyroid disorders?

While thyroid hormones and testosterone can influence each other, this test alone cannot diagnose thyroid disorders. If a thyroid disorder is suspected, specific thyroid function tests would be necessary.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total LCMSMS

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Sex Hormone Binding

The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test measures the concentration of SHBG in the blood. SHBG is a protein that is produced by the liver and binds tightly to testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and estradiol (an estrogen). In this bound state, it transports them in the blood as an inactive form. The amount of SHBG in circulation is affected by age and sex, by decreased or increased testosterone or estrogen production and can be affected by certain diseases and conditions such as liver disease, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, and obesity. Changes in SHBG levels can affect the amount of testosterone that is available to be used by the body's tissues. A total testosterone test does not distinguish between bound and unbound testosterone but determines the overall quantity of testosterone. If a person's SHBG level is not normal, then the total testosterone may not be an accurate representation of the amount of testosterone that is available to the person's tissues.

TESTOSTERONE, FREE

TESTOSTERONE, TOTAL,

A testosterone test measures the amount of the male hormone, testosterone, in the blood. Both men and women produce this hormone. In males, the testicles produce most of the testosterone in the body. Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of low testosterone: In boys -- early or late puberty and in men -- impotence, low level of sexual interest, infertility, thinning of the bones In females, the ovaries produce most of the testosterone and levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of higher testosterone levels, such as: decreased breast size, excess hair growth, increased size of the clitoris. irregular or absent menstrual periods and male-pattern baldness or hair thinning.

TESTOSTERONE,BIOAVAILABLE

*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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