Hepatitis Screening

Hepatitis Screening and health information

Are you looking for a way to screen yourself for hepatitis?

Our Ulta Lab Tests hepatitis testing can detect infections caused by hepatitis A, B, and C viruses.

If you test positive, you’ll have the information to seek treatment right away. You can feel confident knowing that our tests are accurate and reliable because they’re processed through Quest Diagnostics. Plus, we offer same-day testing, so there’s no waiting around, and test results are available in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by one of several viruses. It can cause mild to severe illness, and it can sometimes lead to death. The three main types are hepatitis A, B, and C. Each type has different symptoms and treatments. If you’re at risk for any of these infections, we recommend getting tested today!

If you want to learn more about hepatitis and the lab tests that can help you, click on the title of the articles below.

You could be at risk for a hepatitis infection if you share needles or other drug-related equipment with others; if you were born to a mother who had the virus; if you received blood transfusions before 1992; or if you think that there is a chance that you may have been exposed to the virus through sexual contact or from sharing personal items such as razors or toothbrushes with someone who has the virus. Don’t wait until it’s too late – get tested today!

Ulta Lab Tests offers a cost-effective and convenient way to take control of your health! Order your discounted lab tests online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and have your specimen collected at one of our 2100 nationwide locations. Ulta Lab Tests is the ideal solution for anybody looking for accurate lab test results quickly and simply, with 30-minute in-and-out local testing, guaranteed low prices, and confidential results. Additionally, you can use our dynamic charting feature to track changes in your results over time. 

So, what are you waiting for? Place your hepatitis lab test order now from the list of tests displayed below. 


Name Matches

The tests in Hepatitis Testing Explained: Key Lab Tests and How to Understand Them

  • Hepatic Function Panel [ 10256 ]
  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total [ 508 ]
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody (IgM) [ 4848 ]
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation [ 498 ]
  • Hepatitis C AB with reflex to HCV RNA, QN, PCR [ 8472 ]
  • Hepatitis C Viral RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR [ 35645 ]
     

Includes

Hepatitis A Antibody, Total; Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Qualitative; Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation; Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total; Hepatitis C Antibody with Reflex to HCV, RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation: Positive samples will be confirmed based on the manufacturer's FDA approved recommendations at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 87341).


If Hepatitis C Antibody is reactive, Hepatitis C Viral RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 87522).


Hepatitis A Antibody, Total (IgM - IgG)

Hepatitis A Total (IgM - IgG) Blood Test is used to help diagnose a liver infection due to the hepatitis A virus. There are several causes of hepatitis and the accompanying symptoms, so this test may be used to determine if the symptoms are due to hepatitis A.

The total Hepatitis A antibody test detects both IgM and IgG antibodies and thus may be used to identify both current and past infections. This test will also be positive after receiving the vaccine, so sometimes it may be used to determine whether a person has developed immunity after vaccination.

  • A positive result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates  exposure to hepatitis A vairus but does not rule out acute infection. 
  • A Negative result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates no current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be recommended if at risk.

Results of this hepatitis testing may indicate the following.

A total antibody test detects both IgM and IgG antibodies but does not distinguish between them.

If the total antibody test or hepatitis A IgG result is positive and someone has never been vaccinated against HAV, then the person has had past exposure to the virus. About 30% of adults over age 40 have antibodies to hepatitis A.


Hepatitis A IgM Antibody & Total A Antibody Panel conatins the following 2 tests.

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody
  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total

This test is used to help diagnose a liver infection due to the hepatitis A virus. There are several causes of hepatitis and the accompanying symptoms, so this test may be used to determine if the symptoms are due to hepatitis A.

Hepatitis A Antibody, Total

The total Hepatitis A antibody test detects both IgM and IgG antibodies and thus may be used to identify both current and past infections. This test will also be positive after receiving the vaccine, so sometimes it may be used to determine whether a person has developed immunity after vaccination.

Hepatitis A IgM Antibody

The Hepatitis A IgM antibody test detects the first antibody produced by the body when it is exposed to hepatitis A. This test is used to detect early or recent infections and to diagnose the disease in people with symptoms of acute hepatitis. IgM antibodies to Hepatitis A suggest a current, acute or recent Hepatitis A infection.

Results of this hepatitis testing may indicate the following.

If Hepatitis A IgM Antibody is positive the results indicate Acute or recent Hepatitis A virus infection.

If Hepatitis A IgM Antibody is negative and the Hepatitis A Antibody, Total is positive then the results indicate no active infection but previous Hepatitis A virus exposure; has developed immunity to Hepatitis A virus or recently vaccinated for Hepatitis A virus.


Description: The Hepatitis A IgM Antibody test is a blood test used to screen for recent exposure to Hepatitis A and to help diagnose liver infection.

Also Known As: HAV AB Test, Hepatitis A Virus Antibody Test, Anti HAV Test, Anti Hepatitis A Virus Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Hepatitis A IgM Antibody test ordered?

When someone shows evidence of an acute infection, testing for hepatitis A antibodies is recommended.

When a person is suspected to have been exposed to the virus, regardless of whether or not symptoms are present, a HAV test may be conducted.

Testing is also often ordered to show proof of immunization.

What does a Hepatitis A IgM Antibody blood test check for?

Hepatitis A is a highly infectious liver infection caused by hepatitis A virus. Hepatitis is a condition marked by inflammation and enlargement of the liver, and it can be caused by a variety of things. This test looks for antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a hepatitis A infection in the blood.

Hepatitis A is one of five hepatitis viruses known to cause the disease, with the others being B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A can cause a severe, acute illness that lasts 1 to 2 months, but unlike the other hepatitis viruses, it does not create a persistent infection.

Hepatitis A is transmitted from person to person most usually by stool contamination or by swallowing food or water contaminated by an infected person's stool. Direct contact with an infected person, international travel, direct contact with a newly arrived international adoptee, a recognized foodborne outbreak, men having sex with men, and use of illegal drugs are all recognized risk factors for hepatitis A.

Hepatitis can be caused by a variety of things, but the symptoms are all the same. The liver is damaged and unable to function normally in hepatitis. It can't remove toxins or waste products like bilirubin from the body since it can't digest them. Bilirubin and liver enzyme levels in the blood can rise as the disease progresses. While tests like bilirubin or a liver panel can inform a doctor if someone has hepatitis, they don't tell them what's causing it. Hepatitis viral antibody testing may aid in determining the etiology.

Lab tests often ordered with a Hepatitis A IgM Antibody test:

  • Hepatitis A IgG Antibody test
  • Hepatitis B Testing
  • Hepatitis C Testing
  • Hepatitis Panel
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • AST
  • ALT
  • ALP
  • Bilirubin

Conditions where a Hepatitis A IgM Antibody test is recommended:

  • Liver Disease
  • Viral Hepatitis
  • Traveler’s Diseases
  • Food and Waterborne Illness

How does my health care provider use a Hepatitis A IgM Antibody test?

This test is used to diagnose a hepatitis A virus caused liver infection. Hepatitis and its symptoms can be caused by a variety of things, therefore this test can help you figure out if your symptoms are caused by hepatitis A.

This test will also come back positive after a person has received the Hepatitis A vaccine, therefore it can be used to see if they have developed immunity following immunization.

Other tests, such as bilirubin, hepatic function panel, ALT, and AST, may be used in conjunction with viral hepatitis testing to assist diagnose the condition in acute hepatitis.

What do my Hepatitis A Antibody test results mean?

A total antibody test identifies both IgM and IgG antibodies without distinguishing between the two.

If the test is positive and the person has never been vaccinated against HAV, then person has been exposed to the virus. Hepatitis A antibodies are found in about 30% of persons over the age of 40.

If the test is negative, then the person has neither been exposed or vaccinated against the Hepatitis A Virus.

Results of this hepatitis testing may indicate the following:

  • If Hepatitis A IgM Antibody is positive the results indicate Acute or recent Hepatitis A virus infection.
  • If Hepatitis A IgM Antibody is negative and the Hepatitis A Antibody, Total is positive then the results indicate no active infection but previous Hepatitis A virus exposure; has developed immunity to Hepatitis A virus or recently vaccinated for Hepatitis A virus.
  • Dietary supplements containing biotin may interfere in assays and may skew analyte results to be either falsely high or falsely low. For patients receiving the recommended daily doses of biotin, draw samples at least 8 hours following the last biotin supplementation. For patients on mega-doses of biotin supplements, draw samples at least 72 hours following the last biotin supplementation.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Hepatitis B Core Antibody (IgM) also known as (Anti-HBc, IgM)

Clinical Significance

Hepatitis B core-specific IgM class antibody has been detected in most acute infections and is a reliable marker for acute disease. In some cases, hepatitis B core IgM antibody may be the only specific marker for the diagnosis of acute infection with hepatitis B virus.

Alternative Name(s)

Anti-HBc, IgM

A Positive Result may indicate an Acute infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be flare of chronic infection or Acute infection is resolving (convalescent). 


This assay does not distinguish between Total B core antibody IgG and IgM detected before or at the onset of symptoms; however, such reactivity can persist for years after illness, and may even outlast anti-HBs. Occasionally Hepatitis B core antibody may be the only marker of either current or past Hepatitis B infection.

Description: Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Qualitative is a test that will determine if there are Hep B antibodies present in the blood.

Also Known As: Hep B Test, Hep B Surface Antibody Test, Hep B Antibody Test, Hepatitis B Antibody Test, Hep B Surface Ab Test, HBV Antibody Test, HBV Surface Antibody Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test ordered?

When someone exhibits acute hepatitis-related signs and symptoms, a hepatitis B test may be requested to evaluate whether the symptoms are caused by HBV infection.

When the findings of normal testing, such as ALT and/or AST, are increased, hepatitis B tests may be performed as a follow-up. Since they may only cause minor symptoms that can be mistaken for the flu, acute forms of hepatitis can occasionally be identified in this way. Chronic hepatitis is more frequently found when routine test results are abnormal and more frequently has no symptoms.

When a person is at high risk for developing chronic hepatitis B, a test for hepatitis B surface antigen may be utilized for screening.

Hepatitis B tests may be run on a regular basis to check on persons with chronic hepatitis B infections. Since HBeAg may disappear on its own in certain individuals, hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B e antigen measurements are often performed every six to twelve months. HBeAg and HBV DNA testing can be used to evaluate the efficacy of treatment in patients with chronic HBV.

What does a Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test check for?

Hepatitis B tests look for chemicals that indicate a recent or past hepatitis B virus infection. While some tests look for viral proteins or antibodies created in response to an infection, others look for or assess the virus' genetic makeup. A person who has immunity as a result of prior exposure or who now has an active infection can be determined by the pattern of test findings.

The symptoms of hepatitis include inflammation and liver enlargement. It can be caused by a number of different things, one of which is virus infection. One of the five "hepatitis viruses" that have been found thus far is HBV. Hepatitis A, hepatitis C, hepatitis D, and hepatitis E make up the remaining four.

Contact with blood or other bodily fluids from an infected person can transfer HBV. For instance, sharing needles for IV drug usage or having sex without protection can expose someone. Greater risk applies to people who reside in or travel to regions of the world where hepatitis B is common. Rarely, generally during or after birth, women might transmit the virus to their newborns. The virus cannot be spread by innocuous actions like shaking hands, coughing, or sneezing. However, the virus can survive outside the body for up to seven days, including in dried blood. It can also spread through the sharing of objects like toothbrushes or razors with an infected individual.

Effective hepatitis B vaccines have been available in the United States since 1981, and starting in 1991, medical professionals there started immunizing newborns. Nevertheless, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the virus is present in between 804,000 and 1.4 million Americans, the majority of whom are unaware that they are infected.

HBV infections can range in severity from a brief, mild form to a more dangerous, chronic variant that lasts for years. Serious side effects from persistent HBV can occasionally include cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Acute HBV infection, albeit potentially dangerous, typically goes away on its own in most adults. Children and infants are more likely than adults to have a persistent infection. 90% of newborns with HBV infection go on to acquire a chronic illness. Between 25% and 50% of children between the ages of one and five are at risk of acquiring chronic hepatitis. Only 6% to 10% of HBV infections that start after age five progress to chronic disease.

Most people with persistent infections won't show any symptoms. The signs and symptoms of acute infections are quite similar to those of other acute hepatitis types. Fever, exhaustion, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice are among the symptoms. The liver is damaged and unable to function normally when someone has acute hepatitis. It might not eliminate toxins or waste materials from the body, such bilirubin. Bilirubin and liver enzyme levels in the blood may rise as the disease progresses. Although tests like bilirubin or a liver panel can show a doctor that a patient has hepatitis, they cannot tell them what is causing it. The cause may be found with tests that look for hepatitis virus infection.

Testing for hepatitis B can be done in the absence of symptoms, to identify if an infection is acute or chronic, or to keep track of a chronic infection and how well therapy is working.

Lab tests often ordered with a Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test:

  • Hepatitis A Antibody Testing
  • Hepatitis C Antibody Testing

Conditions where a Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test is recommended:

  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver Disease

How does my health care provider use a Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test?

Antibody generated in response to HBV surface antigen is detected by hepatitis B surface antibody test. It is used to determine the necessity for immunization or if a person has recovered from an infection and is immune. It can also arise from effective vaccination.

What do my Qualitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test results mean?

If antibodies are not detected, it indicates that a person has not developed antibodies to the Hepatitis B Virus.

If antibodies are detected, it indicates that a person has developed antibodies to the Hepatitis B Virus.

Clinical Significance

The detection of anti-HBs is indicative of a prior immunologic exposure to the antigen or vaccine. To determine immune status as ≥10 mIU/mL as per CDC guidelines, please order Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Quantitative.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Quantitative is a test that will determine if there are Hep B antibodies present in the blood.

Also Known As: Hep B Test, Hep B Surface Antibody Test, Hep B Antibody Test, Hepatitis B Antibody Test, Hep B Surface Ab Test, HBV Antibody Test, HBV Surface Antibody Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Quantitative test ordered:

Hepatitis B antibody testing is generally ordered to determine immunity to Hepatitis B through the detection of antibodies in the blood. This testing is often requested for medical records related to school and healthcare professions.

What does a Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Quantitative blood test check for?

Antibodies to the hepatitis B virus are detected in hepatitis B antibody tests, which indicate a past infection or immunization against the virus.

Hepatitis is a liver infection that causes inflammation and enlargement. It can be caused by a number of factors, one of which is virus infection. HBV is one of five "hepatitis viruses" known to primarily infect the liver that have been found thus far. Hepatitis A, hepatitis C, hepatitis D, and hepatitis E are the other four.

HBV is disseminated through coming into touch with an infected person's blood or other bodily fluids. For example, exposure can occur through the sharing of IV drug needles or through unprotected intercourse. People who reside in or travel to places of the world where hepatitis B is common are more vulnerable. Mothers can spread the virus to their newborns on a rare occasion, generally during or after delivery. The virus is not spread through simple hand-to-hand contact, coughing, or sneezing. The virus, however, can survive for up to seven days outside the body, including in dried blood, and can be spread by sharing razors or toothbrushes with an infected individual.

Effective hepatitis B vaccines have been available in the United States since 1981, and health care providers began immunizing infants at birth in 1991. Despite this, the CDC believes that between 804,000 and 1.4 million persons in the United States are infected with the virus, the majority of whom are unaware of their infection.

HBV infections can range in severity from a mild infection that lasts a few weeks to a more dangerous chronic infection that lasts years. Chronic HBV can sometimes lead to significant problems including cirrhosis or liver cancer.

The great majority of people who have chronic infections don't show any signs or symptoms. The symptoms of acute infections are remarkably similar to other types of acute hepatitis. Fever, tiredness, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice are some of the symptoms. The liver is damaged and unable to function normally in acute hepatitis. It may not be able to remove toxins or waste products like bilirubin from the body. Bilirubin and liver enzyme levels in the blood may rise as the disease progresses. While tests like bilirubin and a liver panel can tell a doctor if someone has hepatitis, they can't tell them what's causing it. Tests for hepatitis virus infection may aid in determining the cause.

Lab tests often ordered with a Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Quantitative test:

  • Hepatitis A antibody test
  • Hepatitis C antibody test
  • Acute Viral Hepatitis Panel
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • Bilirubin Fractionated
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel
  • AST
  • ALT
  • Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase

Conditions where a Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Quantitative test is recommended:

  • Hepatitis
  • Liver Disease

How does my health care provider use a Quantitative Hepatitis B Surface Antibody test?

Antibody generated in response to HBV surface antigen is detected by hepatitis B surface antibody test. It is used to determine the necessity for immunization or if a person has recovered from an infection and is immune. It can also arise from effective vaccination.

What do my Hepatitis B antibody test results mean?

If antibodies are not detected, it indicates that a person has not developed antibodies to the Hepatitis B Virus.

If antibodies are detected, it indicates that a person has developed antibodies to the Hepatitis B Virus.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: The hepatitis B Surface antigen test is a blood test that checks for hepatitis b antigen in your blood’s serum. If hepatitis B antigen is detected, confirmation testing will be performed.

Also Known As: Hep B Test, HBsAg Test, Hepatitis B Antigen Test, HBV Test, HBV Surface Antigen Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

IMPORTANT:  NOTE THIS IS A REFLUX TEST - The price charged for this test is only for the Hepatitis B Surface Antigen. ADDITIONAL CHARGE OF $39 WILL OCCUR FOR THE REFLUX CONFIRMATION if the Hepatitis B Surface Antigen is positive.

When is a Hepatitis B Surface Antigen test ordered?

When someone develops signs and symptoms of acute hepatitis, hepatitis B tests may be conducted to see if they are caused by HBV infection.

When standard test findings such as ALT and/or AST are elevated, hepatitis B testing may be ordered as a follow-up. Acute varieties of hepatitis can sometimes be diagnosed this way since they only generate minor symptoms that are easily confused with the flu. Chronic hepatitis is more typically diagnosed when routine test results are abnormal and has no symptoms.

When someone falls into one of the high risk categories for chronic hepatitis B, a test for hepatitis B surface antigen may be utilized for screening.

Hepatitis B tests may be repeated on a regular basis to monitor persons who have chronic hepatitis B infections. Hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis Be antigen are normally evaluated every 6 months to a year since HBeAg can disappear on its own in certain persons. HBeAg and HBV DNA testing can be used to detect whether or not a patient is receiving effective treatment for chronic HBV.

What does a Hepatitis B Surface Antigen blood test check for?

Hepatitis B tests look for chemicals that indicate a present or former hepatitis B infection. Some tests look for viral antigen or antibodies produced in response to an infection, while others look for or analyse the virus's genetic material. A person with a current active infection or immunity as a result of earlier exposure can be identified by the pattern of test findings.

Hepatitis is a liver infection that causes inflammation and enlargement. It can be caused by a number of factors, one of which is virus infection. HBV is one of five "hepatitis viruses" known to primarily infect the liver that have been found thus far. Hepatitis A, hepatitis C, hepatitis D, and hepatitis E are the other four.

HBV is transmitted through contact with an infected person's blood or other bodily fluids. For example, exposure can occur through the sharing of IV drug needles or through unprotected intercourse. People who live in or go to locations where hepatitis B is widespread are more vulnerable. Mothers can spread the virus to their newborns on a rare occasion, usually during or after delivery. The virus is not spread through simple hand-to-hand contact, coughing, or sneezing. The virus, however, can survive for up to seven days outside the body, including in dried blood, and can be spread by exchanging razors or toothbrushes with an infected individual.

Efficient hepatitis B vaccines have already been available in the United States since 1981, and health care providers began immunizing newborns at birth in 1991. Despite this, the CDC believes that between 804,000 and 1.4 million persons in the United States are infected with the virus, the majority of whom are unaware of their infection.

HBV infections can range in severity from a mild infection that lasts a few weeks to a more dangerous chronic infection that lasts years. Chronic HBV can sometimes lead to significant problems including cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Acute HBV infection, albeit potentially dangerous, normally goes away on its own in most adults. Infants and children are more likely than adults to get a persistent infection. Ninety percent of newborns affected with HBV will develop a chronic illness. Between the ages of one and five, the risk of having chronic hepatitis lowers to 25% to 50%. Only 6% to 10% of HBV illnesses become chronic in children over the age of five.

The great majority of people who have chronic infections don't show any signs or symptoms. The symptoms of acute infections are remarkably similar to other types of acute hepatitis. Fever, tiredness, nausea, vomiting, and jaundice are some of the symptoms. The liver is damaged and unable to function normally in acute hepatitis. It may not be able to remove toxins or waste products like bilirubin from the body. Bilirubin and hepatic enzyme levels in the blood may rise as the disease progresses. While tests like bilirubin and a liver panel can tell a doctor if someone has hepatitis, they can't tell them what's causing it. Tests for hepatitis virus infection may aid in determining the cause.

Hepatitis B testing can be used to detect infection in the absence of symptoms, to establish whether an infection is acute or chronic, and to track the progress of a chronic infection and its treatment.

Lab tests often ordered with a a Hepatitis B Surface Antigen test:

  • Hepatitis A Test
  • Hepatitis C Test
  • Hepatitis Panel
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • Bilirubin
  • AST
  • AST
  • GGT
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Conditions where a Hepatitis B Surface Antigen test is recommended:

  • Hepatitis
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Liver Disease
  • HIV

How does my health care provider use a Hepatitis B Antigen test?

Hepatitis B viral tests can be used for a number of different reasons. Some tests look for antibodies produced in response to HBV infection, while others look for antigens produced by the virus and yet others look for viral DNA.

In most cases, one set of tests is used as an initial panel of tests to diagnose HBV infection or determine the reason of acute symptoms, while another set of tests may be performed after a diagnosis to track disease progression, detect chronic infection, and/or determine carrier status.

What do my Hepatitis B Surface antigen test results mean?

Hepatitis B tests can be requested alone, although they are frequently ordered in combination, depending on the purpose for testing. The results of the tests are usually compared. The significance of one test result may be influenced by the outcome of another. However, not everyone is subjected to all tests.

If the findings of initial and follow-up testing suggest that a person has chronic hepatitis B, the individual may be treated with medication, and the effectiveness of that therapy can be tracked using HBe antigen and antibody tests, as well as HBV DNA tests.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Hepatitis Be Antibody - Hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs) - Detects antibody produced in response to HBV surface antigen. Used to detect previous exposure to HBV; it can also develop from successful vaccination so it is used to determine the need for vaccination (if anti-HBs is absent) or to determine if a person has recovered from an infection and is immune (cannot get the infection again).

Clinical Significance

HBeAb appears in the early convalescence of HBV infection. With carrier state and chronic hepatitis, HBeAb may not develop.

Alternative Name(s)

HBe Antibody,Anti-Hepatitis Be


Hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAG) - Detects protein produced and released into the blood. Often used as a marker of ability to spread the virus to other people (infectivity); it may also be used to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. However, there are some types (strains) of HBV that do not make e-antigen; these are especially common in the Middle East and Asia. In areas where these strains of HBV are common, testing for HBeAg is not very useful to determine whether the virus can be spread to others.

 

 

Clinical Significance

HBeAg indicates active HBV replication. Infectivity is evaluated based on HBeAg and HBsAg. When HBeAg persists much longer than 10 weeks, the patient is likely to develop chronic hepatitis and be a carrier.

Alternative Name(s)

HBe Antigen


Description: The hepatitis C antibody test is a test that looks for the antibodies for hepatitis C, if they are found more testing will be performed. The additional test for a positive hepatitis C antibody result is a quantitative test that will measure the amount of the virus that is present. This can be used for treating hepatitis C. This test also may be used to rule out hepatitis C in many cases.

Also Known As: Anti HCV Test, HCV Antibody Test, Hep C Antibody Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

IMPORTANT - THIS IS A REFLEX TEST AND AN ADDITIONAL CHARGE OF $179 WILL BE APPLIED IF THE Hepatitis C Antibody is reactive.

If Hepatitis C Antibody is reactive, then Hepatitis C Viral RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR will be performed at an additional charge of $179.00

When is a Hepatitis C Antibody test ordered?

The CDC recommends using an HCV antibody test to check for HCV infections in patients who:

  • Have ever injected illegal substances
  • Before July 1992, received a blood transfusion or an organ transplant.
  • Have ever received clotting factor concentrates before to 1987
  • ave ever been on long-term dialysis
  • Children born to HCV-positive women
  • Have been exposed to hepatitis C-infected blood
  • Are healthcare, emergency medical, or public safety employees who have been exposed to HCV-positive blood through needlesticks, sharps, or mucosal contact
  • Have been diagnosed with chronic liver disease
  • Have HIV and were born between 1945 and 1965, irrespective of any HCV risk factors

Since 1992, the blood supply in the United States has been regulated, and any units of blood that test positive for HCV are not used in another person. HCV infection from transfused blood is now estimated to be one case per two million transfused units.

When someone has abnormal liver panel findings, for example, or signs and symptoms of hepatitis, HCV antibody testing may be performed. It may be done as part of an acute hepatitis panel in these circumstances. Most persons who are newly infected with HCV have no symptoms or have symptoms that are so minor that they rarely induce a person to seek medical help and get tested for HCV. However, approximately 10-20% of people may have signs and symptoms such as weariness, stomach pain, decreased appetite, and jaundice.

When an antibody test is positive, an HCV RNA test or viral load is requested as follow-up testing to confirm an active infection. If the HCV antibody test is positive, some laboratories will do this test automatically.

When a person is diagnosed with HCV infection, genotyping is often requested before therapy begins to help with treatment selection.

HCV viral load testing may be ordered at the start of treatment, on a regular basis to monitor treatment response, and at the end of treatment to assess its effectiveness.

What does a Hepatitis C Antibody blood test check for?

Hepatitis C is a virus that causes a liver infection that results in liver inflammation and damage. Hepatitis C tests are a collection of tests used to detect, diagnose, and track the progress of a hepatitis C virus infection. The most frequent HCV test searches for antibodies produced in response to an HCV infection in the blood. Other assays detect viral RNA, quantify the amount of viral RNA present, or define the virus's unique subtype.

Hepatitis C is one of five hepatitis viruses known to cause the disease, with the others being A, B, D, and E. HCV is spread by contact with contaminated blood, primarily through intravenous drug users sharing needles, but also through sharing blood-contaminated personal items like razors, sex with an infected person, healthcare occupational exposure, and, less commonly, from mother to baby during childbirth. HCV was commonly spread via blood transfusions before HCV tests became accessible in the 1990s.

While HCV is not as contagious as hepatitis B, no vaccination exists to prevent infection. In North America, hepatitis C infection is a common cause of chronic liver disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were about 30,500 instances of acute hepatitis C in the United States in 2014, with 2.7 to 3.9 million persons living with chronic hepatitis C.

Many people who are afflicted have no symptoms and are unaware that they are infected. The acute HCV infection may produce few to mild nonspecific symptoms, and the chronic infection may go unnoticed for a decade or two before producing enough liver damage to impair liver function.

A positive antibody test is followed with a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects virus genetic material, because the antibody test can remain positive in most patients even after they have eliminated the infection. A positive RNA test result indicates that the virus is present, that the infection has not cured, and that the person may need treatment. To help guide treatment, the hepatitis C genotyping test establishes which strain of virus is present.

A liver panel, which is a collection of tests used to examine the health of the liver, can also be ordered by healthcare providers.

Lab tests often ordered with a Hepatitis C Antibody test:

  • Hepatitis A Antibody
  • Hepatitis B Antibody
  • Hepatitis Panel
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • ALT
  • AST
  • GGT
  • Bilirubin
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Conditions where a Hepatitis C Antibody test is recommended:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Liver Disease
  • Hepatitis

How does my health care provider use a Hepatitis C Antibody test?

Hepatitis C tests are used to detect and diagnose hepatitis C virus infection, as well as to advise therapy and/or monitor the course of treatment.

An HCV antibody test is performed to determine whether or not you have been exposed to the virus before. It looks for antibodies to the virus, which indicates HCV infection. This test will not tell you if you have an active or prior HCV infection. There is some evidence that a "weakly positive" test could be a false positive. All positive antibody tests should be followed by an HCV RNA test, which identifies viral RNA in the blood to assess whether or not the person has a current infection, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The HCV antibody test can be used to establish which of the most prevalent hepatitis viruses is causing a person's symptoms as part of an acute viral hepatitis panel.

The tests listed below can help identify an infection and advise and monitor treatment:

HCV RNA tests: A quantitative HCV RNA test detects and counts viral RNA particles in the blood. This test can be used to confirm the virus's presence and diagnose a live infection. Viral load assays are also used before and throughout treatment to compare the amount of virus present before and after treatment to measure treatment response.

HCV RNA, Qualitative is used to determine whether an infection is present or past. If any HCV viral RNA is identified, the result is reported as "positive" or "detected"; otherwise, the result is ""negative"" or "not detected." This test is no longer often used.

To help guide treatment, viral genotyping is done to detect the kind, or genotype, of HCV present. HCV has five basic kinds and more than 50 subtypes; the most common, genotype 1, accounts for around 75% of infections in the United States. The medications chosen for treatment are influenced by the genotype of HCV infection.

What do my Hepatitis C Antibody test results mean?

Antibody tests for HCV are usually reported as "positive" or "negative."

If the virus is present, the results of HCV viral load tests are provided as a number. The result is frequently reported as "negative" or "not found" if no virus is present or if the amount of virus is too small to detect.

The table below shows how the HCV screening and follow-up tests are interpreted. If the HCV antibody test is positive, the person tested is infected or has likely been infected with hepatitis C at some point. If the HCV RNA test comes back positive, the person is currently infected. If no HCV viral RNA is found, the person either does not have an active infection or has very low levels of the virus.

Antibody to HCV HCV RNA Negative for HCV infection There is no infection or it is too soon after exposure for the test to be reliable; if suspicion persists, retesting at a later period may be necessary.

Positive or inconclusive Negative Past infection or no illness; if necessary, additional tests

Positive, Negative, or Indeterminate Infection currently present

An HCV viral load can be used to determine whether or not treatment is working for monitoring purposes. A high or increasing viral load could indicate that treatment isn't working, whereas a low, declining, or undetectable viral load could indicate that it is.

Successful treatment reduces viral load by 99 percent or more shortly after starting treatment and frequently results in undetectable viral load when treatment is finished. An undetectable viral load in a treated person's blood 12 weeks after the conclusion of treatment indicates that the HCV infection has responded to therapy, according to guidelines from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Disease Society of America.

The findings of the HCV genotype test determine the strain of HCV a person has and aid in treatment selection and duration. Treatment options vary depending on a number of criteria, including the person's HCV genotype and liver condition.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Hepatitis C Antibody with Reflex to HCV, RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR 

IMPORTANT: If Hepatitis C Antibody is reactive, then the Hepatitis C Viral RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR test will be performed at an additional charge of $129.00.

Limitations

Results obtained from immunosuppressed patients should be interpreted with caution. Patients receiving mouse antibody therapy may produce false-negative results.

Reference Range(s)

Hepatitis C Antibody  Non-Reactive

Signal to Cut-off<1.00

Clinical Significance

Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis. The clinical symptoms of an HCV infection are variable. Infection with HCV results in a chronic infection in 50 to 80% of cases. The "window" between HCV acquisition and seroreactivity is highly variable; up to six months.

Alternative Name(s)

HCV with Reflex,HCV Antibody,Anti HCV

 


Hepatitis C Antibody, HCV RNA & Liver Panel

  • Hepatitis C Antibody
  • Hepatitis C Virus RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR
  • Hepatic Function Panel

Hepatitis C antibody tests are used to screen individuals for the infection, including, people with no signs or symptoms but with risk factors, people who have symptoms associated with hepatitis or liver disease, or those who have been exposed to the virus.

Since the antibody test can remain positive for most people even if they have cleared the infection, this panel includes a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects the genetic material of the virus. A positive result on the RNA test means the virus is present, the infection has not resolved, and the person may require treatment. The liver panel is included to assess the health of the liver.

An HCV antibody test is typically reported as "positive" or "negative."

Results of Hepatitis C Virus RNA testing are reported as a number if virus is present. If no virus is present or if the amount of virus is too low to detect, the result is often reported as "negative" or "not detected."

Interpretation of the HCV screening and follow-up tests is shown below. In general, if the HCV antibody test is positive, then the individual tested is infected or has likely been infected at some time with hepatitis C. If the Hepatitis C Virus RNA test is positive, then the person has a current infection. If no Hepatitis C Virus RNA is detected, then the person either does not have an active infection or the virus is present in very low numbers.

HCV Antibody = Negative

No infection or too early after exposure for the test to be accurate; if suspicion remains high, retesting at a later time may be required.

_________________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Negative

Past infection or no infection (false-positive screen); additional testing if indicated

_____________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Weak or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Positive

Current infection


Description: Hepatitis C Viral RNA Quantitative is a blood test that detects and measures Viral HCV RNA in the blood. This test is used to check if a patient has an active Hepatitis C infection.

Also Known As: HCV Test, HCV RNA Test, HCV Viral Load Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Hepatitis C Viral RNA test ordered?

When an antibody test is positive, more testing is required to confirm an active infection, such as an HCV RNA test or viral load. In some labs, if the HCV antibody test is positive, this test will be run immediately.

Testing for HCV viral load may be required before starting therapy, on a regular basis to track treatment response, and at the end of treatment to gauge its efficacy.

What does a Hepatitis C Viral RNA test check for?

The liver infection known as hepatitis C is brought on by a virus and is characterized by liver inflammation and destruction. Hepatitis C tests are a collection of tests used to identify, pinpoint, and track the progress of a hepatitis C virus infection. The most popular HCV test checks for blood antibodies created in response to an HCV infection. Other tests identify the specific subtype of the virus or measure the quantity or presence of viral RNA.

One of the five hepatitis viruses known to cause the disease, along with hepatitis A, B, D, and E, is hepatitis C. HCV is spread through contact with contaminated blood, primarily through the sharing of needles by intravenous drug users, but it can also be transmitted through sex with an infected person, through occupational exposure in the healthcare industry, and, less frequently, from a mother to her unborn child during childbirth. Before HCV testing were made available in the 1990s, blood transfusions were a common way for HCV to spread.

There is presently no vaccination to prevent infection with HCV, despite the fact that it is less contagious than hepatitis B. In North America, hepatitis C infection is a typical contributor to chronic liver disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there were roughly 30,500 cases of acute hepatitis C in the United States in 2014, and there are between 2.7 and 3.9 million Americans who have chronic hepatitis C.

Many infected people exhibit no symptoms and are unaware of their illness. The acute HCV infection may not manifest any symptoms or only mild, nonspecific ones, whereas the chronic infection may go unnoticed for ten or twenty years before producing enough liver damage to impair liver function.

Hepatitis C antibody tests are used to check for the infection in persons, such as those with risk factors but no visible symptoms, those who have hepatitis or liver disease symptoms, or those who have been exposed to the virus.

A positive antibody test is followed by a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects the genetic material of the virus, because the antibody test can remain positive in the majority of patients even though they have recovered from the infection. A positive RNA test result indicates the virus is present, the infection has not cleared up, and treatment may be necessary.

A liver panel is a collection of tests that doctors might conduct to evaluate the condition of the liver.

Lab tests often ordered with a Hepatitis C Viral RNA test:

  • Hepatitis C Antibody Test
  • Hepatitis A Testing
  • Hepatitis B Testing
  • Acute Hepatitis Panel
  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • Bilirubin
  • AST
  • ALT
  • GGT

Conditions where a Hepatitis C Viral RNA test is recommended:

  • Hepatitis C
  • Hepatitis B
  • Liver Disease

How does my health care provider use a Hepatitis C Viral RNA test?

Hepatitis C tests are used to detect and identify the presence of the hepatitis C virus, to direct therapy, and/or to track the progress of an HCV infection.

The HCV RNA test finds and counts the amount of viral RNA in the blood. This examination may be used to identify an ongoing infection and confirm the virus's existence. By comparing the amount of virus before and after treatment, viral load tests are also used to assist measure the effectiveness of the medication.

What do my Hepatitis C Viral RNA test results mean?

If the virus is present, the HCV viral load test results are given as a number. The result is frequently labeled "negative" or "not detected" if there is no virus present or if the virus concentration is too low to detect it.

The individual has an active infection if the HCV RNA test is positive. If no HCV viral RNA is found, either the person does not have an active infection or there are extremely few copies of the virus in their system.

An HCV viral load can show whether or not treatment is working for monitoring purposes. A high or rising viral load can indicate that the treatment is ineffective, whereas a low, falling, or undetectable viral load might suggest that it is.

Soon after starting treatment, a successful course of treatment induces a reduction in viral load of 99% or more, and after treatment is finished, the viral load is typically undetectable. An undetectable viral load in a treated person's blood 12 weeks after the completion of treatment indicates that the HCV infection has responded to therapy, per recommendations from the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Infectious Disease Society of America.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Myasthenia Gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness, most commonly due to autoantibody-mediated loss of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the neuromuscular junction. This assay aids in the differential diagnosis of MG-like muscle weakness, in differentiating between generalized MG and ocular MG, and in monitoring therapeutic response. If binding antibodies are negative, assays for blocking and modulating antibodies should be considered.

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness, most commonly due to autoantibody-mediated loss of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the neuromuscular junction. This assay is most useful when the acetylcholinesterase receptor modulating antibodies are positive. The assay for blocking antibodies is useful in monitoring response to therapy.

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle weakness, most commonly due to autoantibody-mediated loss of functional acetylcholine receptors (AChR) in the neuromuscular junction. Modulating Antibody to AChR causes weakness by inhibiting or modulating binding to the receptors.

Actin is the major antigen to which smooth muscle antibodies react in autoimmune hepatitis. F-Actin IgG antibodies are found in 52-85% of patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) or chronic active hepatitis and in 22% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Anti-actin antibodies have been reported in 3-18% of sera from normal healthy controls.

IMPORTANT - The specimen for this test must be collected at a patient service center that can collect, store and transport frozen samples as outlined below.  

IMPORTANT: Before ordering this lab test, check and confirm with the selected patient service center to ensure that they can collect, store and transport frozen samples as outlined below.

Preferred Specimen(s) 

2 mL frozen plasma collected in an EDTA (lavender-top) tube

Collection Instructions 

Collect blood from stasis-free vein of patient (e.g., no tourniquet). Patient should not clench fist during collection, as muscular exertion often increases venous ammonia levels. Patient should avoid smoking prior to phlebotomy since smoking increases plasma ammonia levels. Tubes should be filled completely and kept tightly stoppered at all times. Place immediately on ice. Separate plasma from cells within 20 minutes and freeze plasma immediately.

Transport Temperature 

Frozen

Specimen Stability 

Room temperature: Unstable
Refrigerated: Unstable
Frozen -20° C: 72 hours
Frozen -70° C: 7 days

Reject Criteria 

Hemolysis • Lipemia • Received thawed • PPT Potassium EDTA (white-top) tube

Description: Ammonia Plasma is a blood test that checks for ammonia levels in your blood’s plasma, and is often ordered by physician’s after sever illness and/or mental changes in a patient to check for ammonia toxicity.

Also Known As: NH3 Test, NH3 Plasma Test, Ammonia Blood Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Plasma

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an Ammonia test ordered?

An ammonia test may be required if an infant exhibits any of these symptoms within the first few days after delivery:

  • Irritability
  • Vomiting
  • Lethargy
  • Seizures

A medical professional may order an ammonia test if a child exhibits these symptoms a week after a viral infection like the flu or chicken pox or if they think the child might have Reye syndrome.

An ammonia level may be requested to help determine the source of the change in consciousness when individuals exhibit mental changes, disorientation, tiredness, or slide into a coma and may have liver disease or renal failure. When a person suddenly becomes more acutely ill, an ammonia level as well as other liver function tests may be requested in patients with stable liver disease.

What does an Ammonia blood test check for?

A byproduct of the breakdown of protein in the intestines, ammonia is largely produced by bacteria. Excess ammonia can build up in the blood if it is not properly digested and eliminated from the body. This examination calculates the blood's ammonia level.

Normally, ammonia travels through the blood to the liver, where it is transformed into the compounds urea and glutamine. Once at the kidneys, the urea is removed through the urine. Ammonia builds up in the blood and can enter the brain if this "urea cycle" does not completely break down the ammonia.

The brain is poisonous to ammonia. For instance, ammonia and other substances processed by the liver can build up in the brain and induce a condition known as hepatic encephalopathy when liver function is considerably impaired as a result of diseases like cirrhosis or hepatitis.

Mental and neurological abnormalities brought on by hepatic encephalopathy can result in confusion, disorientation, tiredness, eventually a coma, and even death.

Children and infants with elevated ammonia levels may vomit often, get agitated, and become progressively more sluggish. If untreated, they could develop respiratory problems, suffer seizures, or fall into a coma.

Lab tests often ordered with an Ammonia test:

  • Hepatic Function Panel
  • ALT
  • AST
  • ALP
  • Glucose
  • Electrolytes Panel
  • Renal Panel
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel

Conditions where an Ammonia test is recommended:

  • Liver Disease
  • Kidney Disease
  • Cirrhosis
  • Hepatitis

How does my health care provider use an Ammonia test?

The ammonia test is used to identify blood levels of ammonia that are elevated and may be brought on by conditions such severe liver illness, kidney failure, Reye syndrome, or a rare hereditary defect of the urea cycle. The test may be employed to aid in determining what is causing a person's changes in behavior and consciousness.

Ammonia is a waste product that the body naturally produces. It primarily results from bacteria in the intestines digesting protein. Excess ammonia can build up in the blood and travel into the brain, where it is poisonous, if the liver is not properly cleansed from the body and processing it.

In order to determine the etiology of a coma or to support the diagnosis of Reye syndrome or hepatic encephalopathy brought on by different liver illnesses, an ammonia test may be requested along with additional tests like glucose, electrolytes, kidney, and liver function tests. A uncommon urea cycle malfunction may also be diagnosed and the severity of the condition assessed using an ammonia level.

There is still debate over the clinical usefulness of the ammonia test for hepatic encephalopathy treatment monitoring among healthcare professionals. Blood ammonia levels do not accurately predict the severity of hepatic encephalopathy since the illness can be brought on by the accumulation of several poisons in the blood and brain.

What do my Ammonia test results mean?

The signs and symptoms of the individual may be brought on by an ammonia level in the blood that is much higher than normal. This signals that the body is not adequately removing and digesting ammonia from the body.

An abnormally high level in newborns can also be a sign of newborn hemolytic illness in addition to a hereditary urea cycle enzyme deficit or abnormality. Newborns frequently experience moderate, brief elevations in ammonia levels, which can rise and fall without manifesting any symptoms.

When children and teens with symptoms have elevated ammonia levels and low glucose levels, Reye syndrome may be present. A higher quantity can also be a sign of an unidentified urea cycle enzymatic malfunction.

An increased ammonia level in both children and adults may signal significant liver or renal impairment that has compromised the body's capacity to eliminate ammonia and that the brain may be harmed. Acute or persistent illnesses frequently act as triggers, raising ammonia levels to the point that a patient has trouble excreting the ammonia.

If a person's blood ammonia level is normal, it's possible that something other than too much ammonia is to blame for their signs and symptoms. Normal ammonia levels do not, however, rule out hepatic encephalopathy. Ammonia levels in the brain may be significantly greater than those in the blood, and other wastes may also play a role in modifications to mental processes and consciousness. This can make it challenging to relate a person's symptoms to ammonia blood levels.

With some types of hypertension, such as essential and malignant, the quantity of ammonia may be reduced.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: An antinuclear antibody screening is a blood test that is going to look for a positive or negative result. If the result comes back as positive further test will be done to look for ANA Titer and Pattern. Antinuclear antibodies are associated with Lupus.

Also Known As: ANA Test, ANA Screen IFA with Reflex to Titer and pattern IFA Test, ANA with Reflex Test, Antinuclear Antibody Screen Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

IMPORTANT Reflex Information: If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge of $13.00

When is an ANA Screen test ordered?

When someone exhibits signs and symptoms of a systemic autoimmune illness, the ANA test is requested. Symptoms of autoimmune illnesses can be vague and non-specific, and they can fluctuate over time, steadily deteriorate, or oscillate between periods of flare-ups and remissions.

What does an ANA Screen blood test check for?

Antinuclear antibodies are a type of antibody produced by the immune system when it is unable to differentiate between its own cells and foreign cells. Autoantibodies are antibodies that attack the body's own healthy cells, causing symptoms like tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle discomfort, and weariness. The moniker "antinuclear" comes from the fact that ANA specifically targets chemicals located in a cell's nucleus. The presence of these autoantibodies in the blood is detected by the ANA test.

The presence of ANA may be a sign of an autoimmune process, and it has been linked to a variety of autoimmune illnesses, the most common of which being systemic lupus erythematosus.

One of the most common tests used to detect an autoimmune disorder or rule out other conditions with comparable signs and symptoms is the ANA test. As a result, it's frequently followed by other autoantibody tests that can help establish a diagnosis. An ENA panel, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, and/or anti-histone test are examples of these.

Lab tests often ordered with an ANA Screen test:

  • ENA Panel
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Complement
  • AMA
  • Centromere antibody
  • Histone Antibody

Conditions where an ANA Screen test is recommended:

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sjogren Syndrome
  • Scleroderma

How does my health care provider use an ANA Screen test?

One of the most often performed tests to diagnose systemic lupus erythematosus is the antinuclear antibody test. It serves as the first step in the evaluation process for autoimmune diseases that might impact various body tissues and organs.

When a person's immune system fails to discriminate between their own cells and foreign cells, autoantibodies called ANA are created. They attack chemicals found in a cell's nucleus, causing organ and tissue damage.

ANA testing may be utilized in conjunction with or after other autoantibody tests, depending on a person's indications and symptoms and the suspected condition. Antibodies that target specific compounds within cell nuclei, such as anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, anti-nucleolar, anti-histone, and anti-RNA antibodies, are detected by some of these tests, which are considered subsets of the general ANA test. In addition, an ENA panel can be utilized as a follow-up to an ANA.

These further tests are performed in addition to a person's clinical history to assist diagnose or rule out other autoimmune conditions such Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis, and scleroderma.

To detect ANA, various laboratories may employ different test procedures. Immunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody are two typical approaches. The IFA is regarded as the gold standard. Some labs will test for ANA using immunoassay and then employ IFA to confirm positive or equivocal results.

An indirect fluorescent antibody is created by mixing a person's blood sample with cells attached to a slide. Autoantibodies in the blood bind to the cells and cause them to react. A fluorescent antibody reagent is used to treat the slide, which is then inspected under a microscope. The existence of fluorescence is observed, as well as the pattern of fluorescence.

Immunoassays—these procedures are frequently carried out using automated equipment, however they are less sensitive than IFA in identifying ANA.

Other laboratory tests linked to inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or C-reactive protein, can be used to assess a person's risk of SLE or another autoimmune disease.

What do my ANA test results mean?

A positive ANA test indicates the presence of autoantibodies. This shows the presence of an autoimmune disease in someone who has signs and symptoms, but more testing is needed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Because ANA test results can be positive in persons who have no known autoimmune disease, they must be carefully assessed in conjunction with a person's indications and symptoms.

Because an ANA test can become positive before signs and symptoms of an autoimmune disease appear, determining the meaning of a positive ANA in a person who has no symptoms can take some time.

SLE is unlikely to be diagnosed with a negative ANA result. It is normally not required to repeat a negative ANA test right away; however, because autoimmune illnesses are episodic, it may be desirable to repeat the ANA test at a later date if symptoms persist.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: An antinuclear antibody screening is a blood test that is going to look for a positive or negative result. If the result comes back as positive further test will be done to look for ANA Titer and Pattern. Antinuclear antibodies are associated with Lupus.

Also Known As: ANA, ANA Screen IFA with Reflex to Titer and pattern IFA, ANA with Reflex, Antinuclear Antibody Screen, DNA-DS Antibody Test, DNA-DS Test, Anti ds-DNA Test, Scl-70 Antibody Test, Anti Scl-70 test, sjogren’s antibody test, SSA-A antibody test, SS-B Antibody test, Sm Antibody Test, Rnp Antibody Sm Rnp Antibody Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge - $13.00

When is a Comprehensive ANA IFA Panel test ordered?

When someone exhibits signs and symptoms of a systemic autoimmune illness, the ANA test is requested. Symptoms of autoimmune illnesses can be vague and non-specific, and they can fluctuate over time, steadily deteriorate, or oscillate between periods of flare-ups and remissions.

What does a Comprehensive ANA IFA Panel blood test check for?

Antinuclear antibodies are a type of antibody produced by the immune system when it is unable to differentiate between its own cells and foreign cells. Autoantibodies are antibodies that attack the body's own healthy cells, causing symptoms like tissue and organ inflammation, joint and muscle discomfort, and weariness. The moniker "antinuclear" comes from the fact that ANA specifically targets chemicals located in a cell's nucleus. The presence of these autoantibodies in the blood is detected by the ANA test.

The presence of ANA may be a sign of an autoimmune process, and it has been linked to a variety of autoimmune illnesses, the most common of which being systemic lupus erythematosus.

One of the most common tests used to detect an autoimmune disorder or rule out other conditions with comparable signs and symptoms is the ANA test. As a result, it's frequently followed by other autoantibody tests that can help establish a diagnosis. An ENA panel, anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, and/or anti-histone test are examples of these.

Lab tests often ordered with a Comprehensive ANA IFA Panel test:

  • ENA Panel
  • Sed Rate (ESR)
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Complement
  • AMA
  • Autoantibodies
  • Centromere antibody
  • Histone Antibody
  • Nuclear Antibody

Conditions where a Comprehensive ANA IFA Panel test is recommended:

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sjogren Syndrome
  • Scleroderma

How does my health care provider use a Comprehensive ANA IFA Panel?

The antinuclear antibody test is one of the most common tests used to identify systemic lupus erythematosus. It is used as a primary test to assist evaluate a person for autoimmune illnesses that affect multiple tissues and organs throughout the body.

When a person's immune system fails to discriminate between their own cells and foreign cells, autoantibodies called ANA are created. They attack chemicals found in a cell's nucleus, causing organ and tissue damage.

ANA testing may be utilized in conjunction with or after other autoantibody tests, depending on a person's indications and symptoms and the suspected condition. Antibodies that target specific compounds within cell nuclei, such as anti-dsDNA, anti-centromere, anti-nucleolar, anti-histone, and anti-RNA antibodies, are detected by some of these tests, which are considered subsets of the general ANA test. In addition, an ENA panel can be utilized as a follow-up to an ANA.

These further tests are performed in addition to a person's clinical history to assist diagnose or rule out other autoimmune conditions such Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis, and scleroderma.

To detect ANA, various laboratories may employ different test procedures. Immunoassay and indirect fluorescent antibody are two typical approaches. The IFA is regarded as the gold standard. Some labs will test for ANA using immunoassay and then employ IFA to confirm positive or equivocal results.

An indirect fluorescent antibody is created by mixing a person's blood sample with cells attached to a slide. Autoantibodies in the blood bind to the cells and cause them to react. A fluorescent antibody reagent is used to treat the slide, which is then inspected under a microscope. The existence of fluorescence is observed, as well as the pattern of fluorescence.

Immunoassays—these procedures are frequently carried out using automated equipment, however they are less sensitive than IFA in identifying ANA.

Other laboratory tests linked to inflammation, such as the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and/or C-reactive protein, can be used to assess a person's risk of SLE or another autoimmune disease.

What do my ANA test results mean?

A positive ANA test indicates the presence of autoantibodies. This shows the presence of an autoimmune disease in someone who has signs and symptoms, but more testing is needed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Because ANA test results can be positive in persons who have no known autoimmune disease, they must be carefully assessed in conjunction with a person's indications and symptoms.

Because an ANA test can become positive before signs and symptoms of an autoimmune disease appear, determining the meaning of a positive ANA in a person who has no symptoms can take some time.

SLE is unlikely to be diagnosed with a negative ANA result. It is normally not required to repeat a negative ANA test right away; however, because autoimmune illnesses are episodic, it may be desirable to repeat the ANA test at a later date if symptoms persist.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

 


Description: The Complement Component C3 test is a blood test used to measure levels of Complement 3 in your blood’s serum as part of autoimmune disease testing.

Also Known As: C3 Test, Complement C3 Test, Complement Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: Overnight fasting is preferred

When is a Complement Component C3c test ordered?

When a person exhibits inexplicable edema, inflammation, or indications of an autoimmune condition like SLE, complement testing may be mandated. It may also be requested when a medical professional wants to assess the complement system of a patient who they suspect may have an immune complex-related disease.

When the total complement activity is abnormal, individual complement components may be ordered to help identify which ones are lacking or defective. The most usually prescribed levels are C3 and C4, however when additional shortages are detected, other levels, such C1 inhibitor, may also be required. Because the relative levels are frequently significant, C3 and C4 are frequently ordered together.

Complement testing may be used to provide a general assessment of the severity of an acute or chronic ailment after a diagnosis, with the underlying supposition that the severity is related to the decline in complement levels. When a doctor wishes to track the progression of a problem, they could occasionally order complement testing.

What does a Complement Component C3c blood test check for?

More than 30 circulating blood proteins make up the intricate complement system, which functions to support inflammatory and immunological responses. Its main function is to eliminate invading infections like viruses and bacteria. When the body produces antibodies against its own tissues that it misinterprets as foreign, the complement system can also be activated. The amount or activity of complement proteins in the blood is measured by complement assays.

A component of the body's innate immune system is the complement system. The innate immune system is non-specific and rapid to react to external molecules, in contrast to the acquired immune system, which generates antibodies that target and defend against specific threats. It does not require prior exposure to an invasive drug or bacterium and does not keep track of prior interactions.

The primary complement proteins are numbered C1 through C9. There are nine of them. Together with the remaining proteins, these elements form complexes that react to infections, non-self tissues, dead cells, and inflammation by activating, amplifying, breaking apart, and generating cascades.

There are numerous strategies to start complement activation. These are known as lectin, alternative, or classical routes. However, the development of the membrane attack complex is the common result of all activation mechanisms. Several things happen as a result of complement activation:

  • Each pathogen or aberrant cell that has been selected for eradication adheres to the surface thanks to the MAC. It produces lysis, or the demise of the cell by letting the contents out, much like puncturing a water-filled balloon, by creating a lesion in the membrane wall.
  • It makes blood arteries more permeable, enabling white blood cells to go from the bloodstream and into the tissues to fight infections.
  • WBCs are drawn to the infection site by it.
  • It promotes the killing of germs by macrophages and neutrophils during phagocytosis, a process.
  • It makes immune complexes more soluble and aids in their removal from the circulation.

The amount or activity of complement proteins in the blood is measured by complement assays. To ascertain whether the system is operating normally, complement components might be examined individually or collectively. The two complement proteins that are most routinely tested are C3 and C4. If a medical professional suspects a shortfall that cannot be detected by C3 or C4, total complement activity can be assessed. The function of the entire C1–C9 classical complement pathway is evaluated by CH50. Each of the nine complement levels can be measured separately to check for inherited or acquired deficits if this reading is outside the usual range.

Lab tests often ordered with a Complement Component C3c test:

  • Complement Component C4c
  • CH50
  • Sed Rate
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • ANA Screen
  • Antibody Screen

Conditions where a Complement Component C3c test is recommended:

  • Autoimmune Disorders
  • Lupus
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Kidney disease
  • Vasculitis

How does my health care provider use a Complement Component C3c test?

To ascertain whether shortages or anomalies in the complement system are the root cause of, or contribute to, a person's sickness or condition, complement assays, most frequently C3 and C4, are utilized.

What do my Complement Component C3c test results mean?

Increased consumption or, less frequently, a congenital deficit, can cause complement levels to drop. A high incidence of recurrent microbial infections is typically caused by a hereditary defect in one of the complement proteins. Reduced complement levels are linked to a higher risk of autoimmune disease development. While C3 alone is often low in septicemia and diseases brought on by fungus or parasites, like malaria, C3 and C4 levels are typically both decreased in SLE.

Complement levels will typically return to normal if the underlying acute or chronic ailment can be treated if the deficiency is brought on by one of these.

Complement activity may be reduced with:

  • Hepatitis
  • Cirrhosis
  • Malnutrition
  • Septicemia
  • Kidney Disease
  • Lupus
  • Angioedema
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis

During acute or chronic inflammation, complement protein levels typically rise together with those of other unrelated proteins known as acute phase reactants. When the underlying illness is treated, all of these often return to normal. Comparatively to the frequently ordered C-reactive protein, complement proteins are less frequently measured in these circumstances, hence the value of their measurement in these circumstances is not discussed here.

Increased complement activity include can be seen with:

  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Thyroiditis
  • Sarcoidosis
  • Cancer
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: The CH50 blood test is a screening test used to measure total complement activity in your blood’s serum.

Also Known As: CH50 Test, Total Complement Test, Complement Activity Test, Total Complement Activity Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Complement Total test ordered?

When a person exhibits inexplicable edema, inflammation, or indications of an autoimmune condition like SLE, complement testing may be mandated. It may also be requested when a medical professional wants to assess the complement system of a patient who they suspect may have an immune complex-related disease.

When the total complement activity is abnormal, individual complement components may be ordered to help identify which ones are lacking or defective.

Complement testing may be used to provide a general assessment of the severity of an acute or chronic ailment after a diagnosis, with the underlying supposition that the severity is related to the decline in complement levels. Occasionally, a doctor may also request complement testing to keep track of the progression of a problem.

What does a Complement Total blood test check for?

Over 30 blood proteins make up the intricate complement system, which functions to support inflammatory and immunological responses. Its main function is to eliminate invading infections like viruses and bacteria. The body's production of antibodies against its own tissues, which occurs in autoimmune disorders, can also cause the complement system to become active. The amount or activity of complement proteins in the blood is measured by complement assays.

A component of the body's innate immune system is the complement system. The innate immune system is non-specific and rapid to react to external molecules, in contrast to the acquired immune system, which generates antibodies that target and defend against specific threats. It does not require prior exposure to an invasive drug or bacterium and does not keep track of prior interactions.

The primary complement proteins are numbered C1 through C9. There are nine of them. Together with the remaining proteins, these elements produce complexes that react to infections, non-self tissues, dead cells, or inflammation by activating, amplifying, breaking apart, and generating complexes.

Lab tests often ordered with a Complement Total test:

  • Sed Rate
  • C-Reactive Protein
  • Rheumatoid Factor
  • ANA Screen
  • Antibody Screen

Conditions where a Complement Total test is recommended:

  • Liver Disease
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Hemolytic Anemia
  • Systemic Lupus Erythematosis
  • Bacterial Endocarditis
  • Leukemia
  • Hodgkin’s Disease
  • Sarcoma
  • Behcet’s Disease

How does my health care provider use a Complement Total test?

When a person has a disease or illness, complement tests are done to evaluate whether deficiencies or abnormalities in the complement system are the root cause or a contributing factor. In order to assess the overall integrity of the classical complement pathway, total complement activity may be ordered. To check for deficits, additional complement components are obtained if necessary.

What do my Complement Total test results mean?

It's possible for complement levels to drop as a result of greater intake or, less frequently, a congenital deficiency. A high incidence of recurrent microbial infections is typically caused by a hereditary defect in one of the complement proteins. Reduced complement levels are linked to a higher risk of autoimmune disease development.

Complement levels will typically return to normal if the underlying acute or chronic ailment can be treated if the deficiency is brought on by one of these.

During acute or chronic inflammation, complement protein levels typically rise together with those of other unrelated proteins known as acute phase reactants. When the underlying illness is treated, all of these often return to normal. Comparatively to the frequently ordered C-reactive protein (CRP), complement proteins are less frequently assessed in these circumstances; hence, the value of their testing in these circumstances is not discussed here.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.



According to the CDC, about 4.4 million Americans are currently infected with Hepatitis B or C. Many of them are not even aware that they have the infection. These numbers are seriously high, so it's important to educate yourself about hepatitis in all its forms and how to take preventative measures against infection.

Thankfully, science has been able to identify the disease and develop effective hepatitis testing methods. As a result, it is easier than ever to get tested for all forms of hepatitis and get on the fast track to treatment and recovery.

To learn more about hepatitis and how you can get tested, read this guide.

What Is Hepatitis A, B & C?

Hepatitis is a disease that causes inflammation of the liver. This condition can come from either an autoimmune disorder or a viral infection. Hepatitis comes in many forms and comes from many different causes, so staying vigilant with your health is key.

Hepatitis can be dangerous because the liver performs many vital functions for our body. It helps filter our blood to remove toxins and it produces bile for proper digestion. Without our liver, we could not:

  • Digest what we consume
  • Filter toxins from our body
  • Store and break down essential vitamins, minerals, proteins, fats, and carbohydrates
  • Synthesize clotting factors or essential blood proteins

Your liver is not an organ you can sacrifice when it goes bad. Unlike a gallbladder, we cannot live without a functioning liver. Hepatitis, therefore, can be life-threatening.

Types of Hepatitis

There are several different forms of hepatitis, including A, B, C, D, and E. The most common forms are A, B, and C. Each form causes hepatitis but comes from a different virus.

Hepatitis A and E are usually acute, short-term conditions. Hepatitis B, C, and D typically become long-term, chronic illnesses.

Hepatitis A comes from consuming food or water that HAV-infected feces has contaminated. This usually occurs when the feces has come from someone infected with HAV. Hepatitis E is similar yet much rarer in the US because it typically occurs in countries with poor sanitation.

Hepatitis B comes from contact with HBV-infected fluids such as vaginal fluid, semen, or blood from someone with hepatitis B. Hepatitis D is very rare as it can only occur in conjunction with hepatitis B—it depends on HBV to survive.

Hepatitis C is carried by HCV, and it is similar to B as it is also transmitted through contact with infected fluids.

If you are living in the United States, you should mainly worry about hepatitis A, B, and C.

Causes and Risk Factors for Hepatitis A, B, and C.

When it comes to risk factors for hepatitis, doctors will warn against certain lifestyle choices. Because the hepatitis-causing viruses transfer through bodily fluids and waste, coming in close contact with or sharing certain devices with infected people puts you at risk.

For example, you could contract HBV or HCV if you have had a sexual interaction with an infected person. Therefore, if you have multiple or new sex partners, you are at higher risk of infection.

HBV and HCV are also commonly transferred through unsanitary drug injection practices. Sharing a needle with an infected person could put you at risk of infection. Sharing razors, too, could cause infection if razors have come in contact with infected blood.

The risks of developing hepatitis generally have nothing to do with whether you are biologically more susceptible to it. Both men and women are equally vulnerable, and no pre-existing conditions cause higher rates of infection.

Certain conditions that physicians call hepatitis, however, can link to your biological makeup. An autoimmune disorder can inflame your liver. This occurs when your immune system believes your liver is a foreign invader and attacks it.

A form of hepatitis, also called alcoholic hepatitis, can come from excessive alcohol and drug use. Introducing your liver to excessive toxins over a period of time can lead to serious liver damage and inflammation.

Signs and Symptoms of Hepatitis A, B, and C?

Hepatitis A is an acute, short-term illness. You will most likely experience signs and symptoms right away, such as sudden nausea and vomiting, fatigue, and pain around the liver. Get tested right away if you also experience the signs below.

Hepatitis B and C are long-term illnesses that may not show signs right away. Your symptoms will worsen over time. You could experience:

  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Fatigue
  • Pale stool
  • Dark urine
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Pain in the abdomen
  • Signs of jaundice, like yellow eyes and skin

These signs are all related to liver dysfunction and might not necessarily be caused by hepatitis. That's why it is so important to get tested immediately to determine the cause.

How Is Hepatitis A, B, and C Diagnosed?

If you go to a doctor for a hepatitis B screening or a hepatitis C screening, they will first ask about your medical history and lifestyle. Then, they will perform a physical hepatitis screening exam.

They will look for risk factors in your lifestyle and check for yellowed eyes and skin or discomfort around the liver. Whether the preliminary exam shows signs or not, a doctor will likely run further tests to determine your condition.

You can get a hepatitis B test and a hepatitis C test if your doctor feels your condition is long-term rather than acute. These tests can find antibodies in your blood that indicate you are fighting off the infection. 

Hepatitis Testing for A, B, and C

Physicians can perform a number and combination of tests to diagnose your condition. Blood tests and liver function tests can determine whether your health condition is caused by hepatitis and further diagnose you with a type. Ultrasounds and liver biopsies are also options, but more invasive and generally unnecessary for diagnosis.

Even without the hassle of a doctor's appointment and extra exams, you can get results immediately with a blood test from Ulta Lab Tests. If you are concerned at all that you have contracted hepatitis, you can buy a highly accurate and reliable blood test to be performed and analyzed in private. You can take control of your health and move forward with an informed decision.

Take Control of Your Health Today

Order your hepatitis lab tests today with Ulta Lab Tests. Here are a few great things to love about our service:

- You'll get secure and confidential results
- You don't need health insurance
- You don't need a physician's referral
- You'll get affordable pricing
- We offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee
- Results within 24-48 hours for most tests

Take control of your health today with Ulta Lab Tests.