Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella

The MMR titer test checks if you are immune to Measles, Mumps, and Rubella. It measures your antibody levels to get a sense of whether have mmr immunity and your immune system can respond to an infection with one of these diseases. Order yours today from Ulta Lab Tests and get your results confidentially online.


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Measles, also known as Rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. IgM is consistent with current or recent infection. IgM tests can generate false positive results and low levels of IgM can persist for longer than 12 months.

Measles Antibody IgG - to establish whether you have immunity to measles due to a previous infection or to vaccination.

Measles, also known as rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. 

Alternate Test Name: Measles Immunity Test



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Measles Immunity Test - to establish whether you have immunity to measles due to a previous infection or to vaccination.

Measles, also known as rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. 

Alternate Test Name: Measles Antibody IgG


Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Immunity Profile

MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


Mumps is an acute, usually self-limited systemic illness characterized by parotidites, high fever and fatigue. One third of infections are asymptomatic. A live attenuated vaccine is available. The mumps EIA IgG antibody test is sufficiently sensitive to establish immune status of the patient.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a Rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evident of immunity to Rubella.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to rubella. A positive rubella IgM result does not necessarily indicate current or recent infection. Without a history of exposure to rubella or symptoms consistent with rubella, the IgM result may be difficult to interpret. Rubella IgM can be false positive due to other causes (e.g., parvovirus, rheumatoid factor, cytomegalovirus). Rubella IgM may also persist for more than 12 months after vaccination or natural infection. For a serologic diagnosis of congenital rubella in the neonatal period, antibody to rubella virus should be measured in both infant and maternal sera. If IgM is detected in a newborn infants serum, it is probable that transplacental rubella infection has occurred.

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Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a Rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to Rubella.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to rubella.

T-cell deficiency is frequently associated with chronic, recurrent mucocutaneous candidiasis. B-cell deficiency is frequently associated with recurrent, complicated or severe pyrogenic infections. Deficiencies of T and B cells are observed in many medical conditions. Often, more specific evaluations are required after a deficiency is identified.

Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) causes chicken pox and when reactivated, potentially decades later, causes shingles. Twenty percent of adults will develop shingles, a rash or blister of the skin that may cause severe pain. Varicella-Zoster IgG, EIA reliably measures immunity due to previous infection, but is unsuitable for detection of post-vaccination immune status.

The Varicella Zoster Virus Antibodies, IgG test is typically done to check for immunity to the virus which causes chickenpox.  Varicella Zoster Virus is a member of the Herpes Virus family.  This test measures the level of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to the virus.  Results provide a numerical value for the antibody level which can be compared to a reference interval to determine immune status.  IgG antibodies are typically detectable a few weeks after the initial infection.  In the United States, many people are vaccinated against Varicella when they are young.  In most cases those who contract the virus and recover develop a natural immunity which protects them from catching it again. 

The most common condition which results from infection with Varicella is Chickenpox.  The infection causes an outbreak of an itchy rash and the development of small fluid-filled blisters.  During the primary infection, chickenpox is highly contagious and spread through coughing, sneezing or touching fluid from the blisters.  Most people recover without treatment and the virus remains latent in their system.  There is a possibility for the virus to reactivate later in life, especially in those with weakened immune systems.  This can cause shingles, a condition characterized by a painful burning or itching sensation on one or more areas of the body.  Shingles typically clear up after a few weeks as the virus becomes latent again.

The Varicella IgG Antibody Titer is usually ordered when someone is required to show proof of immune status for work or school.  It may also be done for organ transplant patients or pregnant women.

The Varicella Titer is also available as part of our Immunity Panel which includes other common titer tests.


Varicella Zoster Virus Antibodies (IgG, IgM)  

 


Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) causes chicken pox and when reactivated, potentially decades later, causes shingles. Twenty percent of adults will develop shingles, a rash or blister of the skin that may cause severe pain.


Before the MMR vaccine became available, three to four million people contracted measles every year in the United States. The CDC estimates that 400 to 500 people died among reported cases, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 1,000 developed brain swelling each year.

While the United States declared measles eliminated from the country in 2000, there are still outbreaks from time to time. In addition, if vaccine coverage levels were to drop, measles could once again become a constant presence. 

If you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, you'll benefit from undergoing an MMR titer test to understand if you have immunity.

Defining Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

One of the first written accounts of measles is from the ninth century by a Persian doctor. However, in 1757, Francis Home, a Scottish doctor, determined that an infection causes measles in the blood. 

In 1912, the United States declared measles a nationally notifiable disease, requiring healthcare providers to report diagnosed cases. In that first decade of reporting, approximately 6,000 measles-related deaths were reported each year. 

Mumps, also called parotitis, affects the salivary glands. While some people may experience no symptoms, others could have painfully swollen glands, headache, fever, fatigue, and appetite loss. Patients typically recover in about two weeks. 

Rubella, also known as German measles, is best recognized by its distinctive red rash. Rubella is highly contagious, and it spreads through close contact or the air. Most illnesses are mild, but the condition can quickly become severe. 

Risk Factors and Causes of Measles, Mumps, Rubella 

Because measles, mumps, and rubella have generally been eliminated from the United States, there are only a few risk factors. Those factors include the following: 

  • Not being vaccinated
  • Traveling internationally 
  • Having a vitamin A deficiency

If you think you might have contracted measles, mumps, or rubella, it's important to contact a healthcare provider as soon as possible. 

Signs and Symptoms of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella 

If someone has contracted measles, their symptoms will start to appear 7 to 21 days after exposure. It starts with a mild to moderate fever, runny nose, sore throat, red eyes, and a cough. 

Two to four days after symptoms present, tiny white spots will begin to appear inside the mouth. Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash appears, typically on the face. The rash is raised and feels like sandpaper and spreads down the entire body. 

When the rash appears, a person's temperature can spike as high as 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms typically last seven to ten days. There is no specific treatment for this illness, but a diagnosis can be confirmed with an MMR blood titer test. 

Mumps can cause pain in the swollen salivary glands, pain while chewing, muscle aches, fever, headache, and fatigue. It's important to see a doctor, as mumps is highly contagious for about nine days after symptoms appear. 

If left untreated, mumps can cause inflammation in different parts of the body like the testicles, brain, spinal cord, and pancreas. 

Rubella presents differently in children and adults. For children with rubella, a red rash is typically the first sign. They may also experience a low-grade fever, headache, general discomfort, and a cough. 

In adults, rubella is typically a mild illness that involves a low-grade fever, sore throat, and rash. 

Diagnosing Measles, Mumps, and Rubella

Doctors are typically able to diagnose measles based on the distinct characteristics of the disease, like the rash and the white spots on the inside of the cheek. If necessary, a blood test could confirm measles. Physicians will also sometimes test with a throat swab or urine sample. 

With a confirmed diagnosis, a patient needs to understand what they need to do to improve their health and protect others. There is no specific treatment for a measles infection, but measures can be taken to protect others who may have been exposed to the virus. 

For example, a doctor could order a post-exposure vaccination or immune serum globulin. With either route, measles may be prevented or develop with milder symptoms. 

If you suspect you have mumps, your doctor will start by asking if you've been vaccinated against the illness and whether you know of potential exposure. Thye may recommend a blood test to check for evidence of the mumps virus.

A rubella rash can look like a number of other viral rashes. To confirm a diagnosis, your doctor will order laboratory tests. You may have a blood test or a virus culture. 

MMR Immunity and the MMR Titer Test 

Immunity for measles, mumps, and rubella is most easily achieved with a vaccine. The most common vaccine for measles is MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Research has shown that the vaccine is safe and is the most effective way to have MMR immunity. 

Common side effects associated with the vaccine include pain at the injection site, fever, mild rash, and swollen glands in the neck or cheek. 

If you're uncertain if you've been vaccinated, you'll benefit from an MMR titer blood test. The MMR antibody titer test checks for immunity to the three illnesses by measuring antibody levels to determine if your immune system can respond to an infection with one of the diseases. 

The MMR titer test can also be used, in some instances, as a way to diagnose measles, mumps, or rubella. This is because the presence of certain viral antibodies can be evidence of an infection. 

Frequently Asked Questions About MMR

Even with all of the information above, you may still have questions about measles, mumps, and rubella. Keep reading for answers to some of the most frequently asked questions. 

  • How do you know if you're protected against MMR?
    • The CDC considers a person protected against measles, mumps, and rubella if they received two doses of the MMR vaccine as a school-age child or adult, received one dose of the MMR vaccine if you are a preschool-age child, you were officially diagnosed with measles, mumps, or rubella at some point in your life, or you were born before 1957. 
  • What should you do if you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, mumps, or rubella? 
    • If you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, mumps, or rubella, call your healthcare provider to determine if you have a vaccination record on file and whether you need to start certain medications to reduce your risk of developing any of the three diseases.
  • What do you do if you test positive for measles, mumps, or rubella?  
    • If you test positive for measles, mumps, or rubella, you need to stay home for at least four days after you start to develop a rash, practice good hygiene, and disinfect frequently touched surfaces. 

For more information on MMR, consult your primary care physician. 

Learn More From Ulta Lab Tests 

If you're looking for fast results to an MMR titer test, Ulta Lab Tests can help. 

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable. When you order testing from us, you'll have access to secure and confidential results. And, you won't need to worry about having a doctor's referral or health insurance. 

Order your MMR titer tests today, and your results will be provided to you securely and confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

Take control with Ulta Lab Tests today!