Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Varicella

MMR Titer Testing and health information

The MMR titer test checks if you are immune to Measles, Mumps, and Rubella. It measures your antibody levels to get a sense of whether you have MMR immunity and your immune system can respond to an infection with one of these diseases. Order yours today from Ulta Lab Tests and get your results confidentially online.

Do you know if you are immune to measles, mumps, and rubella?

The MMR titer test is a blood test that measures the levels of antibodies in your body. It can tell whether or not you are immune to these diseases. If your antibody levels are high enough, it means that your immune system can respond effectively if an infection with one of these diseases occurs. This protects you from getting sick and developing serious complications like pneumonia or encephalitis (brain swelling). If your antibody levels aren’t high enough, it means that there is a chance for you to get sick when exposed to one of these viruses, even though we recommend vaccination as the best way to prevent them.

The MMR titer test checks your antibody levels to see if they are high enough to fight off an infection with one of these diseases. It’s a popular blood test to measure if you have immunity; it means your body can respond to an infection with one of these diseases. This is important because the vaccine doesn’t work for everyone, and some people may not be able to get vaccinated due to allergies or other medical conditions. 

If you want to learn more about measles, mumps, and rubella and lab testing that can help you, click on the title of the articles below.

Don’t let yourself become sick from something preventable! Order your MMR titer tests from the list below today and learn if you require vaccinations to protect yourself from these diseases before they become harmful.

Get tested today! We offer fast results, so you don’t have to wait long before knowing what they mean for your health and plans. Minimize the hassle and cost of lab testing with Ulta Lab Tests! We provide discounted lab tests online, with results in 24–48 hours for most tests. Plus, you can get your tests done locally and quickly at over 2,100 sites nationally. With our secure and confidential results, you may track your health over time. We also accept FSA and HSA cards.

 

 


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MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

The MMR (IgG) Panel is the perfect way to ensure that you are protected against measles, mumps, and rubella. This panel provides you with everything you need to know about your immunity to these diseases and will help you make sure that you are up-to-date on your vaccinations. The Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), and Rubella Immune Status are all included in this thorough panel, so you can rest assured that you are getting a complete picture of your health.

Order the MMR (IgG) Panel today, and be prepared for anything life throws your way.

What is MMR IgG titer?

The MMR (IgG) Panel is a blood test that measures the levels of antibodies to measles, mumps, and rubella in your body. Antibodies are proteins that your immune system produces in reaction to infections. By measuring the levels of these antibodies in the blood, it is possible to assess whether or not an individual is immune to these diseases.

What does the MMR (IgG) Panel include?

This panel includes the Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status, and Rubella Virus Genotype. The Measles Antibody (IgG) portion of the panel will tell you if you have immunity to measles. The Mumps Antibody (IgG) portion of the panel will tell you if you have immunity to mumps. The Rubella Immune Status portion of the panel will tell you if you are immune to rubella. The Rubella Virus Genotype is used to determine which type of rubella virus you have been infected with.

Why do I need the MMR (IgG) Panel?

The MMR (IgG) Panel is recommended for people who want to ensure that they are up-to-date on their vaccinations. This panel is also recommended for international travelers and for students at post-high school educational institutions.

What is MMR titer positive?

A positive MMR titer means that you have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. A positive MMR titer is generally considered to be protective for life.

What is MMR titer negative?

A negative MMR titer means that you do not have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. If you have a negative MMR titer, you should receive the MMR vaccine.

I have a positive MMR titer. Do I still need vaccinations?

Yes, you should still receive vaccinations even if you have a positive MMR titer. This is because the levels of antibodies in your body can decline over time, and you may no longer be protected against these diseases. Vaccinations will help to boost your immunity and help to keep you safe.

I have a negative MMR titer; what does that mean?

A negative MMR titer means that you do not have immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella. You should receive the MMR vaccine if you have a negative titer. The MMR vaccine is an efficient and safe method of protection against many diseases.

What are the risks of the MMR (IgG) Panel?

There are no risks associated with this panel. This panel is a blood test that is performed using a small sample of blood.There is no discomfort or pain involved with this test.

How do I prepare for the MMR (IgG) Panel?

There is no preparation necessary for this panel. You can eat and drink normally before and after the test.

When will I get my results?

Your results will be available within 1-2 business days.

If you have any further questions about the MMR (IgG) Panel, please contact us at any time. We are here to help you and to ensure that you are getting the most accurate and up-to-date information possible.

How often do you need MMR titers?

It is generally recommended that you get an MMR titer test every five years or so to make sure that your immunity levels are still high. You may also need to get an MMR titer test more frequently if you are exposed to measles, mumps, or rubella. If you are unsure about how often you should get an MMR titer test, please speak to your doctor or healthcare provider.

 


Description: The MMR titer test is a test that provides evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella from a routine series of vaccinations. These results are commonly used for students going into higher education, or for international travelers.

Also Known As: MMR Panel, Rubeola Test, Measles Virus Test, Measles Titer Test, Mumps Virus Test, Mumps Antibody test, Mumps Titer Test, German Measles test, 3 Day Measles Test, Three Day Measles Test, Rubella Titer Test, MMR Immune Status Test, Measles Mumps Rubella Test

Collection Method: Blood draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is an MMR Titer test ordered?

An IgG antibody test for measles, mumps, and rubella may be conducted if a health care provider wants to see if a patient is immune to the viruses, either from a past infection or vaccination.

When a person has measles-like signs and symptoms, or has been exposed to someone who has the virus and now has a fever and some symptoms that could be attributable to measles, IgM and IgG antibody testing may be requested.  These tests are usually ordered early in the infection's progress.

Measles symptoms usually appear 7 to 18 days after exposure and includes one or more of the following:

  • A rash on the face that progresses to the rest of the body
  • Fever that is very high
  • Coughing that is dry
  • Itchy, red, watery eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • A stuffy nose
  • Throat irritation
  • Inside the mouth, there are tiny white dots

When a person has mumps-like signs and symptoms, or has been exposed to someone who has the virus and now has a fever and some symptoms that could be attributable to mumps, IgM and IgG antibody testing may be requested.  These tests are usually ordered early in the infection's progress.

Mumps signs and symptoms appear after a 2 to 3 week incubation period and are commonly mistaken for flu symptoms, such as:

  • Headache
  • Fever 
  • Muscle aches

These are followed by parotitis, which is a swelling of the salivary glands beneath one or both ears.

When a woman is pregnant or planning to become pregnant, an IgG rubella test is ordered. It is required anytime a check for rubella immunity is required. When a pregnant woman exhibits signs and symptoms that could indicate a rubella infection, IgM and IgG rubella tests may be conducted.

The following are some of the signs and symptoms:

  • Fever
  • A pink rash that starts on the face and extends downhill to the body, legs, and arms; once the rash goes to the body, it may disappear from the face.
  • A stuffy or runny nose
  • Eyes that be red or inflamed
  • Joints that hurt
  • Lymph nodes swollen

A health practitioner will need to request the tests to confirm the diagnosis because numerous illnesses can cause identical symptoms.

IgM and IgG tests may be ordered for a newborn if the mother was diagnosed with rubella during pregnancy and/or if the newborn is born with congenital rubella syndrome-related birth abnormalities such as hearing loss, heart defects, or clouded lens of the eyes.

Because antibodies to rubella take time to form after infection, the tests may be repeated after day 5 of sickness onset and 7-21 days following the initial samples to examine if antibody levels have become detectable and to see if they are rising or dropping over time.

This test is still necessary for women in some states as part of the blood testing required to acquire a marriage license.

When numerous persons have been exposed and show the signs and symptoms indicated above, testing may be required during a suspected or confirmed outbreak.

What does an MMR Titer blood test check for?

The viruses that cause measles and mumps belong to the Paramyxoviridae family. They both induce infections that normally go away within a few days, but in rare situations, they might lead to significant problems. Both can be avoided by being vaccinated. Antibodies developed in response to infection may be detected in the blood during measles and mumps testing. In addition, employing culture or a molecular approach such as polymerase chain reaction, the virus or its genetic material can be detected directly in a sample. These techniques can be used to a wide range of samples.

The number of instances of measles and mumps infections in the United States has dropped from several hundred thousand to a few hundred per year. Comprehensive measles and mumps immunization campaigns are to blame for the declines. While vaccines exist for each virus, combination vaccines, such as MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella all at once, are commonly used. In recent years, the majority of new cases in the United States have occurred in rare outbreaks, mostly among persons who have not been vaccinated, particularly those who have gone to places of the world where measles or mumps are more common.

Rubella, or "the German measles," is spread by respiratory secretions. After a one to two week incubation period, the virus damages cells in the lungs and the back of the throat, resulting in symptoms like a high fever, dry cough, red eyes, light sensitivity, a runny nose, sore throat, tiny white spots inside the mouth, and a rash that starts on the face and moves down the body to the trunk and legs.

The majority of patients recover in a few weeks, but up to 20% of them experience consequences such as ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, diarrhea, or, in rare cases, encephalitis or blindness. People who are malnourished, deficient in vitamin A, or have weakened immune systems are more likely to be affected. Women who are pregnant and infected with measles are more likely to have a miscarriage or go into labor prematurely.

Vaccination has greatly reduced the number of persons infected with measles in the United States and many other countries of the world, but the World Health Organization still considers measles to be a top cause of mortality in children under the age of five. Measles killed roughly 145,700 individuals worldwide in 2013, according to their estimates, the majority of whom were youngsters under the age of five.

The outcome of the immunization campaign In the United States, endemic measles was declared eradicated in 2000. Small outbreaks, however, continue to occur on a yearly basis. The majority of cases occur in people who are either unvaccinated or whose vaccination status is unknown, and most outbreaks are linked to travel to locations where measles outbreaks are happening.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 911 cases of measles were reported from 63 outbreaks between 2001 and 2011. With almost 600 cases recorded in 2014, the United States experienced the greatest number of measles cases in 20 years. Many were linked to visitors who had visited the Philippines, where there had been an unusually significant outbreak of over 50,000 cases.

The CDC, as well as the medical communities in the United States and around the world, remain worried and watchful. Measles is still endemic in many parts of the world, there is always the possibility of travelers spreading the disease, and small percentages of the population remain unvaccinated.

Mumps is a viral infection spread through saliva or respiratory secretions. An infected person often gets flu-like symptoms such as a headache, muscle aches, and fever after a 2 to 3 week incubation period, followed by parotitis. Mumps is usually a mild, self-limiting condition, but some patients can develop problems like temporary or permanent deafness, testicular or ovarian inflammation, pancreatitis, meningitis, or encephalitis.

Mumps, a milder condition than measles, is no longer as frequent as it once was, although it is still endemic in many regions of the world. Mumps cases in the United States range from 200 to 2,000 every year, according to the CDC. Outbreaks can happen in places where people interact frequently, such as classrooms, sports teams, or college dorms. Several tiny outbreaks occurred on college campuses in California, Maryland, and Virginia between 2011 and 2013, for example, although their spread was limited.

The rubella test detects antibodies in the blood that form as a result of a rubella infection or immunization. Rubella testing can be used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Ascertain that you are protected against the rubella virus.
  • Find out if you've had an infection recently or in the past.
  • Determine who has not been exposed to the virus and who has not received a vaccine.
  • Check to see if all pregnant women and those planning to get pregnant have enough rubella antibodies to prevent infection.

Rubella is a viral infection that normally causes a slight fever and rash that lasts two to three days. The infection normally goes away on its own. Rubella, on the other hand, can cause major difficulties in the developing infant if a pregnant woman acquires it for the first time during the first three months of her pregnancy.

A rubella test may be ordered for anyone, pregnant or not, who is experiencing symptoms that a doctor believes are caused by a rubella infection. It may also be ordered for a newborn who is suspected of contracting rubella during pregnancy or who has congenital birth abnormalities that a doctor suspects are caused by the illness.

IgM and IgG antibodies are the two types of rubella antibodies that lab tests can detect:

The IgM rubella antibody is the first to develop in the blood following exposure. Except in an infected infant, where it may be observed for several months to a year, the level of this protein rises and peaks in the blood within about 7 to 10 days after infection and then tapers off over the next few weeks.

The IgG rubella antibody takes a little longer to surface than the IgM, but once it does, it stays in the bloodstream for the rest of the patient's life, protecting them from re-infection. IgM rubella antibodies in the blood indicate a recent infection, whereas IgG antibodies can indicate a current or past rubella infection, or that a rubella vaccine was given and is giving appropriate protection.

The IgM rubella test is the gold standard for a fast rubella laboratory diagnosis. The presence of an increase in IgG rubella in blood samples taken when a person is sick and later as they recover can be used to confirm infection. Antibody testing differ between laboratories, and the state health agency can advise on available laboratory services and recommended tests.

Lab tests often ordered with an MMR Titer test:

  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Varicella Zoster Virus
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Conditions where an MMR Titer test is recommened:

  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Travelers’ Diseases
  • Pancreatitis
  • Infertility
  • Pneumonia
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use an MMR Titer test?

Antibody tests for Measles, Mumps, and Rubella can be used to:

  • Confirm if a person is virus-free due to previous infections or vaccinations.
  • Diagnosis of a measles, mumps, or rubella outbreak
  • In order to protect the public's health, epidemics must be detected, monitored, and tracked.

Antibody analysis

Antibody testing can be used to confirm immunity, identify a current infection, or follow outbreaks. Antibodies to the measles, mumps and rubella viruses are viral-specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to infection with the virus or immunization. IgM and IgG antibodies are the two types of antibodies generated. IgM antibodies are the first to emerge in the blood after exposure or immunization. IgM antibody levels rise over several days to a peak, then gradually decline over the next few weeks. IgG antibodies take a little longer to develop, but once they do, they remain positive for the rest of your life, protecting you from re-infection. By comparing the levels of antibody in two blood samples taken weeks apart, it is sometimes possible to distinguish between an active and past infection.

What do my MMR test results mean?

When IgM antibodies to measles, mumps, or rubella are present in someone who hasn't been vaccinated recently, it's likely that they have a current measles, mumps, or rubella infection. When both IgM and IgG antibodies are present, or there is a fourfold increase in concentrations between acute and convalescent IgG antibody testing, it is likely that the person is now infected or has recently been infected with measles, mumps, or rubella.

When a person who has been vaccinated and/or is not currently ill possesses measles, mumps, and rubella IgG antibodies, that individual is protected from infection. A person is not deemed immune to the viruses if they do not have MMR IgG antibodies. This could be due to the fact that the person hasn't been exposed to the viruses, the IgG hasn't had enough time to mature, or the person doesn't have a typical antibody response.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Measles, also known as Rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. IgM is consistent with current or recent infection. IgM tests can generate false positive results and low levels of IgM can persist for longer than 12 months.

Description: The Measles Antibody IgG test is used to measure the blood’s serum for measles antibodies, which may be present because of a previous infection or a vaccination.

Also Known As: Rubeola Test, Measles Virus Test, Measles Titer test

Collection Method: Blood draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Measles Antibody IgG test ordered?

An IgG antibody test for measles may be conducted if a health care provider wants to see if a patient is immune to the viruses, either from a past infection or vaccination.

When a person has measles-like signs and symptoms, or has been exposed to someone who has the virus and now has a fever and some symptoms that could be attributable to measles, IgM and IgG antibody testing may be requested.  These tests are usually ordered early in the infection's progress.

Measles symptoms usually appear 7 to 18 days after exposure and include at least one of the following:

  • A common rash that begins on the face and progresses down the body to the trunk and legs
  • Fever that is very high
  • Coughing that is dry
  • Itchy, red, watery eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • A stuffy nose
  • Throat irritation
  • Inside the mouth, there are tiny white dots

When numerous persons have been exposed and show the signs and symptoms indicated above, testing may be required during a suspected or confirmed outbreak.

What does a a Measles Antibody IgG blood test check for?

The viruses that cause measles and mumps belong to the Paramyxoviridae family. They both induce infections that normally go away within a few days, but in rare situations, they might lead to significant problems. Both can be avoided by being vaccinated. Antibodies developed in response to infection may be detected in the blood during measles and mumps testing. In addition, employing culture or a molecular approach such as polymerase chain reaction, the virus or its genetic material can be detected directly in a sample. These techniques can be used to a wide range of samples.

The number of instances of measles and mumps infections in the United States has dropped from several hundred thousand to a few hundred per year. Comprehensive measles and mumps immunization campaigns are to blame for the declines. While vaccines exist for each virus, combination vaccines, such as MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella all at once, are commonly used. In recent years, the majority of new cases in the United States have occurred in rare outbreaks, mostly among persons who have not been vaccinated, particularly those who have gone to places of the world where measles or mumps are more common.

Rubeola, often known as measles, is a highly contagious viral infection spread through respiratory secretions. The virus infects cells in the lungs and back of the throat, causing symptoms such as a fever that is high, red eyes, a dry cough, sensitivity to light, a sore throat, runny nose tiny white spots inside the mouth, and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the body after 1 to 2 weeks.

The majority of patients recover in a few weeks, but up to 20% of them experience consequences such as ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, diarrhea, or, in rare cases, encephalitis or blindness. People who are malnourished, deficient in vitamin A, or have weakened immune systems are more likely to be affected. Women who are pregnant and infected with measles are more likely to have a miscarriage or go into labor prematurely.

Vaccination has greatly reduced the number of persons infected with measles in the United States and many other countries of the world, but the World Health Organization (WHO) still considers measles to be a top cause of mortality in children under the age of five. Measles killed roughly 145,700 individuals worldwide in 2013, according to their estimates, the majority of whom were youngsters under the age of five.

The outcome of the immunization campaign In the United States, endemic measles was declared eradicated in 2000. Small outbreaks, however, continue to occur on a yearly basis. The majority of cases occur in people who are either unvaccinated or whose vaccination status is unknown, and most outbreaks are linked to travel to locations where measles outbreaks are happening.

According to the CDC, 911 cases of measles were reported from 63 outbreaks between 2001 and 2011. With almost 600 cases recorded in 2014, the United States experienced the greatest number of measles cases in 20 years. Many were linked to visitors who had visited the Philippines, where there had been an unusually significant outbreak of over 50,000 cases.

The CDC, as well as the medical communities in the United States and around the world, remain worried and watchful. Measles is still endemic in many parts of the world, there is always the possibility of travelers spreading the disease, and small percentages of the population remain unvaccinated.

Lab tests often ordered with a Measles Antibody IgG test:

  • Measles Antibody IgM
  • Mumps Antibody tests
  • Rubella Antibody tests
  • Varicella Zoster Virus Antibody tests
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Conditions where a Measles Antibody IgG test is recommended:

  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Travelers’ Diseases
  • Pancreatitis
  • Infertility
  • Pneumonia
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use a Measles Antibody IgG test?

Antibody tests for measles can be used to:

  • Confirm if a person is virus-free due to previous infections or vaccinations.
  • Diagnosis of a measles outbreak
  • In order to protect the public's health, epidemics must be detected, monitored, and tracked.

Antibody analysis

Antibody testing can be used to confirm immunity, identify a current infection, or follow outbreaks. Antibodies to the measles viruses are viral-specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to infection with the virus or immunization. IgM and IgG antibodies are the two types of antibodies generated. IgM antibodies are the first to emerge in the blood after exposure or immunization. IgM antibody levels rise over several days to a peak, then gradually decline over the next few weeks. IgG antibodies take a little longer to develop, but once they do, they remain positive for the rest of your life, protecting you from re-infection. By comparing the levels of antibody in two blood samples taken weeks apart, it is sometimes possible to distinguish between an active and past infection.

What do my Measles IgG Antibody test results mean?

When IgM antibodies to measles are present in someone who hasn't been vaccinated recently, it's likely that they have a current measles infection. When both IgM and IgG antibodies are present, or there is a fourfold increase in concentrations between acute and convalescent IgG antibody testing, it is likely that the person is now infected or has recently been infected with measles.

When a person who has been vaccinated and/or is not currently ill possesses measles IgG antibodies, that individual is protected from infection. A person is not deemed immune to the virus if they do not have measles IgG antibodies. This could be due to the fact that the person hasn't been exposed to the virus, the IgG hasn't had enough time to mature, or the person doesn't have a typical antibody response.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Description: The Measles Antibody IgM test is used to measure the blood’s serum for measles antibodies, which may be present because of an active infection.

Also Known As: Rubeola Test, Measles Virus Test, Measles Infection Test

Collection Method: Blood draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Measles Antibody IgM test ordered?

When a person has measles-like signs and symptoms, or has been exposed to someone who has the virus and now has a fever and some symptoms that could be attributable to measles, IgM and IgG antibody testing may be requested.  These tests are usually ordered early in the infection's progress.

Measles symptoms usually appear 7 to 18 days after exposure and include at least one of the following:

  • A common rash that begins on the face and progresses down the body to the trunk and legs
  • Fever that is very high
  • Coughing that is dry
  • Itchy, red, watery eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • A stuffy nose
  • Throat irritation
  • Inside the mouth, there are tiny white dots

When numerous persons have been exposed and show the signs and symptoms indicated above, testing may be required during a suspected or confirmed outbreak.

What does a Measles Antibody IgM blood test check for?

The viruses that cause measles and mumps belong to the Paramyxoviridae family. They both induce infections that normally go away within a few days, but in rare situations, they might lead to significant problems. Both can be avoided by being vaccinated. Antibodies developed in response to infection may be detected in the blood during measles and mumps testing. In addition, employing culture or a molecular approach such as polymerase chain reaction, the virus or its genetic material can be detected directly in a sample. These techniques can be used to a wide range of samples.

The number of instances of measles and mumps infections in the United States has dropped from several hundred thousand to a few hundred per year. Comprehensive measles and mumps immunization campaigns are to blame for the declines. While vaccines exist for each virus, combination vaccines, such as MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella all at once, are commonly used. In recent years, the majority of new cases in the United States have occurred in rare outbreaks, mostly among persons who have not been vaccinated, particularly those who have gone to places of the world where measles or mumps are more common.

Rubeola, often known as measles, is a highly contagious viral infection spread through respiratory secretions. The virus infects cells in the lungs and back of the throat, causing symptoms such as a fever that is high, red eyes, a dry cough, sensitivity to light, a sore throat, runny nose tiny white spots inside the mouth, and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the body after 1 to 2 weeks.

The majority of patients recover in a few weeks, but up to 20% of them experience consequences such as ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, diarrhea, or, in rare cases, encephalitis or blindness. People who are malnourished, deficient in vitamin A, or have weakened immune systems are more likely to be affected. Women who are pregnant and infected with measles are more likely to have a miscarriage or go into labor prematurely.

Vaccination has greatly reduced the number of persons infected with measles in the United States and many other countries of the world, but the World Health Organization (WHO) still considers measles to be a top cause of mortality in children under the age of five. Measles killed roughly 145,700 individuals worldwide in 2013, according to their estimates, the majority of whom were youngsters under the age of five.

The outcome of the immunization campaign In the United States, endemic measles was declared eradicated in 2000. Small outbreaks, however, continue to occur on a yearly basis. The majority of cases occur in people who are either unvaccinated or whose vaccination status is unknown, and most outbreaks are linked to travel to locations where measles outbreaks are happening.

According to the CDC, 911 cases of measles were reported from 63 outbreaks between 2001 and 2011. With almost 600 cases recorded in 2014, the United States experienced the greatest number of measles cases in 20 years. Many were linked to visitors who had visited the Philippines, where there had been an unusually significant outbreak of over 50,000 cases.

The CDC, as well as the medical communities in the United States and around the world, remain worried and watchful. Measles is still endemic in many parts of the world, there is always the possibility of travelers spreading the disease, and small percentages of the population remain unvaccinated.

Lab tests often ordered with a Measles Antibody IgM test:

  • Measles Antibody IgG
  • Mumps Antibody tests
  • Rubella Antibody tests
  • Varicella Zoster Virus Antibody tests
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Conditions where a Measles Antibody IgM test is recommended:

  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Travelers’ Diseases
  • Pancreatitis
  • Infertility
  • Pneumonia
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use a Measles Antibody IgM test?

Antibody tests for measles can be used to:

  • Confirm if a person is virus-free due to previous infections or vaccinations.
  • Diagnosis of a measles outbreak
  • In order to protect the public's health, epidemics must be detected, monitored, and tracked.

Antibody analysis

Antibody testing can be used to confirm immunity, identify a current infection, or follow outbreaks. Antibodies to the measles viruses are viral-specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to infection with the virus or immunization. IgM and IgG antibodies are the two types of antibodies generated. IgM antibodies are the first to emerge in the blood after exposure or immunization. IgM antibody levels rise over several days to a peak, then gradually decline over the next few weeks. IgG antibodies take a little longer to develop, but once they do, they remain positive for the rest of your life, protecting you from re-infection. By comparing the levels of antibody in two blood samples taken weeks apart, it is sometimes possible to distinguish between an active and past infection.

What do my Measles Antibody test results mean?

When IgM antibodies to measles are present in someone who hasn't been vaccinated recently, it's likely that they have a current measles infection. When both IgM and IgG antibodies are present, or there is a fourfold increase in concentrations between acute and convalescent IgG antibody testing, it is likely that the person is now infected or has recently been infected with measles.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Most Popular

Description: The Measles Antibody IgG test is used to measure the blood’s serum for measles antibodies, which may be present because of a previous infection or a vaccination.

Also Known As: Rubeola Test, Measles Virus Test, Measles Titer test

Collection Method: Blood draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Measles Antibody IgG test ordered?

An IgG antibody test for measles may be conducted if a health care provider wants to see if a patient is immune to the viruses, either from a past infection or vaccination.

When a person has measles-like signs and symptoms, or has been exposed to someone who has the virus and now has a fever and some symptoms that could be attributable to measles, IgM and IgG antibody testing may be requested.  These tests are usually ordered early in the infection's progress.

Measles symptoms usually appear 7 to 18 days after exposure and include at least one of the following:

  • A common rash that begins on the face and progresses down the body to the trunk and legs
  • Fever that is very high
  • Coughing that is dry
  • Itchy, red, watery eyes
  • Light sensitivity
  • A stuffy nose
  • Throat irritation
  • Inside the mouth, there are tiny white dots

When numerous persons have been exposed and show the signs and symptoms indicated above, testing may be required during a suspected or confirmed outbreak.

What does a a Measles Antibody IgG blood test check for?

The viruses that cause measles and mumps belong to the Paramyxoviridae family. They both induce infections that normally go away within a few days, but in rare situations, they might lead to significant problems. Both can be avoided by being vaccinated. Antibodies developed in response to infection may be detected in the blood during measles and mumps testing. In addition, employing culture or a molecular approach such as polymerase chain reaction, the virus or its genetic material can be detected directly in a sample. These techniques can be used to a wide range of samples.

The number of instances of measles and mumps infections in the United States has dropped from several hundred thousand to a few hundred per year. Comprehensive measles and mumps immunization campaigns are to blame for the declines. While vaccines exist for each virus, combination vaccines, such as MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella all at once, are commonly used. In recent years, the majority of new cases in the United States have occurred in rare outbreaks, mostly among persons who have not been vaccinated, particularly those who have gone to places of the world where measles or mumps are more common.

Rubeola, often known as measles, is a highly contagious viral infection spread through respiratory secretions. The virus infects cells in the lungs and back of the throat, causing symptoms such as a fever that is high, red eyes, a dry cough, sensitivity to light, a sore throat, runny nose tiny white spots inside the mouth, and a rash that starts on the face and spreads to the body after 1 to 2 weeks.

The majority of patients recover in a few weeks, but up to 20% of them experience consequences such as ear infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, diarrhea, or, in rare cases, encephalitis or blindness. People who are malnourished, deficient in vitamin A, or have weakened immune systems are more likely to be affected. Women who are pregnant and infected with measles are more likely to have a miscarriage or go into labor prematurely.

Vaccination has greatly reduced the number of persons infected with measles in the United States and many other countries of the world, but the World Health Organization (WHO) still considers measles to be a top cause of mortality in children under the age of five. Measles killed roughly 145,700 individuals worldwide in 2013, according to their estimates, the majority of whom were youngsters under the age of five.

The outcome of the immunization campaign In the United States, endemic measles was declared eradicated in 2000. Small outbreaks, however, continue to occur on a yearly basis. The majority of cases occur in people who are either unvaccinated or whose vaccination status is unknown, and most outbreaks are linked to travel to locations where measles outbreaks are happening.

According to the CDC, 911 cases of measles were reported from 63 outbreaks between 2001 and 2011. With almost 600 cases recorded in 2014, the United States experienced the greatest number of measles cases in 20 years. Many were linked to visitors who had visited the Philippines, where there had been an unusually significant outbreak of over 50,000 cases.

The CDC, as well as the medical communities in the United States and around the world, remain worried and watchful. Measles is still endemic in many parts of the world, there is always the possibility of travelers spreading the disease, and small percentages of the population remain unvaccinated.

Lab tests often ordered with a Measles Antibody IgG test:

  • Measles Antibody IgM
  • Mumps Antibody tests
  • Rubella Antibody tests
  • Varicella Zoster Virus Antibody tests
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Conditions where a Measles Antibody IgG test is recommended:

  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • Meningitis
  • Travelers’ Diseases
  • Pancreatitis
  • Infertility
  • Pneumonia
  • Pregnancy

How does my health care provider use a Measles Antibody IgG test?

Antibody tests for measles can be used to:

  • Confirm if a person is virus-free due to previous infections or vaccinations.
  • Diagnosis of a measles outbreak
  • In order to protect the public's health, epidemics must be detected, monitored, and tracked.

Antibody analysis

Antibody testing can be used to confirm immunity, identify a current infection, or follow outbreaks. Antibodies to the measles viruses are viral-specific proteins produced by the immune system in response to infection with the virus or immunization. IgM and IgG antibodies are the two types of antibodies generated. IgM antibodies are the first to emerge in the blood after exposure or immunization. IgM antibody levels rise over several days to a peak, then gradually decline over the next few weeks. IgG antibodies take a little longer to develop, but once they do, they remain positive for the rest of your life, protecting you from re-infection. By comparing the levels of antibody in two blood samples taken weeks apart, it is sometimes possible to distinguish between an active and past infection.

What do my Measles IgG Antibody test results mean?

When IgM antibodies to measles are present in someone who hasn't been vaccinated recently, it's likely that they have a current measles infection. When both IgM and IgG antibodies are present, or there is a fourfold increase in concentrations between acute and convalescent IgG antibody testing, it is likely that the person is now infected or has recently been infected with measles.

When a person who has been vaccinated and/or is not currently ill possesses measles IgG antibodies, that individual is protected from infection. A person is not deemed immune to the virus if they do not have measles IgG antibodies. This could be due to the fact that the person hasn't been exposed to the virus, the IgG hasn't had enough time to mature, or the person doesn't have a typical antibody response.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Mumps is an acute, usually self-limited systemic illness characterized by parotidites, high fever and fatigue. One third of infections are asymptomatic. A live attenuated vaccine is available. The mumps EIA IgG antibody test is sufficiently sensitive to establish immune status of the patient.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a Rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evident of immunity to Rubella.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to rubella. A positive rubella IgM result does not necessarily indicate current or recent infection. Without a history of exposure to rubella or symptoms consistent with rubella, the IgM result may be difficult to interpret. Rubella IgM can be false positive due to other causes (e.g., parvovirus, rheumatoid factor, cytomegalovirus). Rubella IgM may also persist for more than 12 months after vaccination or natural infection. For a serologic diagnosis of congenital rubella in the neonatal period, antibody to rubella virus should be measured in both infant and maternal sera. If IgM is detected in a newborn infants serum, it is probable that transplacental rubella infection has occurred.

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Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a Rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to Rubella.

Rubella is an acute exanthematous viral infection of children and adults. Rash, fever and lymphadenopathy characterize the illness. While many infections are subclinical, this virus has the potential to cause fetal infection with resultant birth defects. Diagnosis of a rubella infection is best made serologically. In the absence of a current or recent infection, a demonstration of specific IgG on a serum sample is evidence of immunity to rubella.

T-cell deficiency is frequently associated with chronic, recurrent mucocutaneous candidiasis. B-cell deficiency is frequently associated with recurrent, complicated or severe pyrogenic infections. Deficiencies of T and B cells are observed in many medical conditions. Often, more specific evaluations are required after a deficiency is identified.

Varicella Zoster Virus Antibodies (IgG, IgM)  

 


Description: The Varicella-Zoster Virus test will test the blood for chickenpox antibodies. This test can be used to determine if a person has the chickenpox antibodies, which can be a result of a previous chickenpox infection or a varicella vaccine.

Also Known As: Varicella Titer Test, VZV Titer Test, VZV Test, Varicella Test, VZV Antibody Test, Chicken Pox Titer Test, Chicken Pox Test, Shingles Titer Test, Shingles Test, Herpes Zoster Virus Test, Herpes Zoster Titer Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody test ordered?

VZV antibody testing may be requested when a healthcare provider wants to see if a patient has gained immunity to VZV, especially if the patient is at high risk, such as an organ transplant recipient or a pregnant woman, and/or if the patient has recently been infected.

When a person at risk, such as a newborn or someone who is immunocompromised, has been exposed to VZV and is ill with atypical and/or severe symptoms, a VZV culture or DNA test may be ordered to detect an active primary VZV infection in the baby or a primary or reactivated infection in the immunocompromised person.

What does a Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody blood test check for?

The varicella zoster virus, a member of the herpes virus family, is responsible for chickenpox and shingles. Antibodies produced by the immune system in response to a VZV infection or the virus itself are detected in varicella zoster virus tests.

To detect and diagnose a current or previous infection with VZV, tests for chickenpox and shingles may be used. Testing is not always necessary to diagnose a current infection because clinical signs and symptoms are often suffice, but in some persons with unusual skin lesions, a diagnostic test can assist confirm the illness. The tests may be used to detect a present infection in some people, particularly organ transplant recipients and pregnant women, or to establish whether or not they have developed immunity from a previous infection or immunization.

VZV affected practically everyone in the United States by adulthood before the release and widespread use of a chickenpox vaccine in 1995. While VZV is present in latent form in many adults who were infected as children, the prevalence of new episodes of chickenpox has decreased dramatically, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The vaccine is around 98 percent effective in avoiding illness after two doses, and those who do get sick usually have milder symptoms.

Chickenpox can be caused by the Varicella zoster virus in children and adults who have not been vaccinated or exposed previously. The primary illness is highly contagious, and it can be spread from person to person by coughing, sneezing, or touching blister fluid. Signs and symptoms of a primary infection include an itchy rash that appears two weeks after virus introduction, followed by the creation of pimple-like papules that turn into small, fluid-filled blisters. The vesicles rupture, forming a crust, and then healing. Over the course of a few days, this process proceeds in two or three waves or "crops" of several hundred vesicles.

The virus becomes dormant after the original infection has passed, remaining in sensory nerve cells. During the infection, the person produces antibodies that usually prevent them from contracting chickenpox again. The virus can reactivate later in life particularly in persons with compromised immune systems, traveling down the nerve cells to the skin and causing shingles.

A mild to intense burning or itching discomfort in a band of skin at the waist, face, or another area is a symptom of shingles. It normally occurs in one region on one side of the body, although it can also happen in many places. A rash with or without vesicles occurs in the same region many days after the pain, itching, or tingling begins. The rash and pain go away in most people after a few weeks, and the virus becomes latent again. A few people may experience pain that lasts for months.

For elderly persons, a shingles vaccination is now available. This vaccine reduces the chances of the virus reactivating as shingles and the severity of the symptoms if it does. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices started recommending a shingles vaccine for all persons aged 60 and up in 2006. The vaccination, however, is not suggested for people with weaker immune systems.

The majority of chickenpox and shingles cases go away on their own. The condition can be more severe and long-lasting in persons with weaker immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS or organ transplant recipients. It may not become latent in some circumstances and spread to the central nervous system.

The consequences of VZV exposure on a developing baby or infant in pregnant women vary depending on when it occurs and whether or not the mother has already been exposed. A primary VZV infection in the first 20 to 30 weeks of pregnancy might cause congenital defects in the unborn infant. The infant may be born with or acquire chickenpox after birth if the illness begins one to three weeks before delivery, though the newborn may be partially protected by the mother's antibodies. VZV infection can be lethal if a newborn is exposed to it at birth and does not have maternal antibody protection.

Lab tests often ordered with a Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody test:

  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Epstein-Barr Virus
  • Lyme Disease
  • Measles
  • Mumps
  • Rubella
  • HIV
  • Tuberculosis
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C

Conditions where a Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody test is recommended:

  • Shingles
  • HIV
  • Pregnancy
  • Encephalitis

How does my health care provider use a Varicella Zoster IgG Antibody test?

Active cases of chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus, are not usually diagnosed using laboratory tests. The signs and symptoms of these illnesses are frequently used to make a diagnosis. Because most adults have been infected with VZV and children have been vaccinated, there is no need for widespread population screening. In some circumstances, however, testing for VZV or antibodies generated in response to VZV infection may be necessary. It may be used in pregnant women, neonates, individuals awaiting organ transplantation, and those living with HIV/AIDS, for example. Testing can be done to see if someone has developed immunity to VZV after being exposed to it previously, either by infection or vaccination.

What do my Varicella Zoster test results mean?

Detection of IgG antibodies are used to determine whether or not a person has experienced previous infection or received vaccination for Varicella Zoster Virus.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) causes chicken pox and when reactivated, potentially decades later, causes shingles. Twenty percent of adults will develop shingles, a rash or blister of the skin that may cause severe pain.


Before the MMR vaccine became available, three to four million people contracted measles every year in the United States. The CDC estimates that 400 to 500 people died among reported cases, 48,000 were hospitalized, and 1,000 developed brain swelling each year.

While the United States declared measles eliminated from the country in 2000, there are still outbreaks from time to time. In addition, if vaccine coverage levels were to drop, measles could once again become a constant presence. 

If you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, you'll benefit from undergoing an MMR titer test to understand if you have immunity.

Defining Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

One of the first written accounts of measles is from the ninth century by a Persian doctor. However, in 1757, Francis Home, a Scottish doctor, determined that an infection causes measles in the blood. 

In 1912, the United States declared measles a nationally notifiable disease, requiring healthcare providers to report diagnosed cases. In that first decade of reporting, approximately 6,000 measles-related deaths were reported each year. 

Mumps, also called parotitis, affects the salivary glands. While some people may experience no symptoms, others could have painfully swollen glands, headache, fever, fatigue, and appetite loss. Patients typically recover in about two weeks. 

Rubella, also known as German measles, is best recognized by its distinctive red rash. Rubella is highly contagious, and it spreads through close contact or the air. Most illnesses are mild, but the condition can quickly become severe. 

Risk Factors and Causes of Measles, Mumps, Rubella 

Because measles, mumps, and rubella have generally been eliminated from the United States, there are only a few risk factors. Those factors include the following: 

  • Not being vaccinated
  • Traveling internationally 
  • Having a vitamin A deficiency

If you think you might have contracted measles, mumps, or rubella, it's important to contact a healthcare provider as soon as possible. 

Signs and Symptoms of Measles, Mumps, and Rubella 

If someone has contracted measles, their symptoms will start to appear 7 to 21 days after exposure. It starts with a mild to moderate fever, runny nose, sore throat, red eyes, and a cough. 

Two to four days after symptoms present, tiny white spots will begin to appear inside the mouth. Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash appears, typically on the face. The rash is raised and feels like sandpaper and spreads down the entire body. 

When the rash appears, a person's temperature can spike as high as 104 degrees Fahrenheit. Symptoms typically last seven to ten days. There is no specific treatment for this illness, but a diagnosis can be confirmed with an MMR blood titer test. 

Mumps can cause pain in the swollen salivary glands, pain while chewing, muscle aches, fever, headache, and fatigue. It's important to see a doctor, as mumps is highly contagious for about nine days after symptoms appear. 

If left untreated, mumps can cause inflammation in different parts of the body like the testicles, brain, spinal cord, and pancreas. 

Rubella presents differently in children and adults. For children with rubella, a red rash is typically the first sign. They may also experience a low-grade fever, headache, general discomfort, and a cough. 

In adults, rubella is typically a mild illness that involves a low-grade fever, sore throat, and rash. 

Diagnosing Measles, Mumps, and Rubella

Doctors are typically able to diagnose measles based on the distinct characteristics of the disease, like the rash and the white spots on the inside of the cheek. If necessary, a blood test could confirm measles. Physicians will also sometimes test with a throat swab or urine sample. 

With a confirmed diagnosis, a patient needs to understand what they need to do to improve their health and protect others. There is no specific treatment for a measles infection, but measures can be taken to protect others who may have been exposed to the virus. 

For example, a doctor could order a post-exposure vaccination or immune serum globulin. With either route, measles may be prevented or develop with milder symptoms. 

If you suspect you have mumps, your doctor will start by asking if you've been vaccinated against the illness and whether you know of potential exposure. Thye may recommend a blood test to check for evidence of the mumps virus.

A rubella rash can look like a number of other viral rashes. To confirm a diagnosis, your doctor will order laboratory tests. You may have a blood test or a virus culture. 

MMR Immunity and the MMR Titer Test 

Immunity for measles, mumps, and rubella is most easily achieved with a vaccine. The most common vaccine for measles is MMR, which protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Research has shown that the vaccine is safe and is the most effective way to have MMR immunity. 

Common side effects associated with the vaccine include pain at the injection site, fever, mild rash, and swollen glands in the neck or cheek. 

If you're uncertain if you've been vaccinated, you'll benefit from an MMR titer blood test. The MMR antibody titer test checks for immunity to the three illnesses by measuring antibody levels to determine if your immune system can respond to an infection with one of the diseases. 

The MMR titer test can also be used, in some instances, as a way to diagnose measles, mumps, or rubella. This is because the presence of certain viral antibodies can be evidence of an infection. 

Frequently Asked Questions About MMR

Even with all of the information above, you may still have questions about measles, mumps, and rubella. Keep reading for answers to some of the most frequently asked questions. 

  • How do you know if you're protected against MMR?
    • The CDC considers a person protected against measles, mumps, and rubella if they received two doses of the MMR vaccine as a school-age child or adult, received one dose of the MMR vaccine if you are a preschool-age child, you were officially diagnosed with measles, mumps, or rubella at some point in your life, or you were born before 1957. 
  • What should you do if you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, mumps, or rubella? 
    • If you think you've been exposed to someone with measles, mumps, or rubella, call your healthcare provider to determine if you have a vaccination record on file and whether you need to start certain medications to reduce your risk of developing any of the three diseases.
  • What do you do if you test positive for measles, mumps, or rubella?  
    • If you test positive for measles, mumps, or rubella, you need to stay home for at least four days after you start to develop a rash, practice good hygiene, and disinfect frequently touched surfaces. 

For more information on MMR, consult your primary care physician. 

Learn More From Ulta Lab Tests 

If you're looking for fast results to an MMR titer test, Ulta Lab Tests can help. 

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable. When you order testing from us, you'll have access to secure and confidential results. And, you won't need to worry about having a doctor's referral or health insurance. 

Order your MMR titer tests today, and your results will be provided to you securely and confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

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