Hemoglobin A1c with eAG Most Popular

The Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test contains 1 test with 3 biomarkers.

Brief Description: The Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) with estimated Average Glucose (eAG) test is a laboratory test that provides information about a person's average blood glucose levels over a period of time, typically the past 2 to 3 months. It is primarily used to monitor and diagnose diabetes and assess blood sugar control.

Also Known As: A1c Test, Glycohemoglobin Test, Glycated Hemoglobin Test, Glycosylated Hemoglobin Test, HbA1c Test, Estimated Average Glucose Test

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Whole Blood

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When is a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test ordered?

A Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test may be ordered in the following situations:

  1. Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes: The test is commonly ordered to diagnose diabetes and evaluate its management. It provides an average measure of blood glucose levels, reflecting long-term control rather than a single point in time.

  2. Monitoring Treatment Efficacy: For individuals already diagnosed with diabetes, the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test is used to monitor how well blood sugar levels are being controlled and to assess the effectiveness of treatment plans, including lifestyle modifications and medication regimens.

What does a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG blood test check for?

Hemoglobin A1c, often known as A1c or glycated hemoglobin, is hemoglobin that has been attached to glucose. By assessing the proportion of glycated hemoglobin, the A1c test determines the average quantity of glucose in the blood during the previous 2 to 3 months.

Hemoglobin is a protein present inside red blood cells that transports oxygen.

Glycated hemoglobin is generated in proportion to the amount of glucose in the blood. Once glucose attaches to hemoglobin, it stays there for the duration of the red blood cell's life, which is usually about 120 days. The most common kind of glycated hemoglobin is known as A1c. A1c is created on a daily basis and is gradually removed from the bloodstream as older RBCs die and younger RBCs replace them.

This test can be used to detect and diagnose diabetes, as well as the risk of developing it. According to the American Diabetes Association's standards of medical care in diabetes, diabetes can be diagnosed using either A1c or glucose.

This test can also be used to track the progress of a diabetic patient's treatment. It aids in determining how well a person's glucose levels have been controlled over time by medication. An A1c of less than 7% suggests good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics for monitoring reasons.

eAG may help you understand your A1C value because eAG is a unit similar to what you see regularly through self-monitoring on your meter.

Lab tests often ordered with a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test:

When this test is ordered, it's often part of a comprehensive evaluation of an individual's glucose metabolism and overall health, particularly in the context of diabetes management or its risk assessment. Several other tests are commonly ordered alongside a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test:

  1. Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) or Fasting Plasma Glucose (FPG):

    • Purpose: Measures blood glucose levels after a period of fasting, usually overnight.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To diagnose diabetes or prediabetes. FBG is often used alongside Hemoglobin A1c to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes.
  2. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT):

    • Purpose: Measures blood glucose levels before and after consuming a glucose-rich drink.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess how well the body processes glucose. OGTT is particularly useful in diagnosing gestational diabetes and prediabetes.
  3. C-Peptide Test:

    • Purpose: Measures the level of C-peptide, which is released into the blood in equal amounts to insulin.
    • Why Is It Ordered: To assess insulin production by the pancreas. This test can help differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes.
  4. Lipid Profile:

    • Purpose: Measures cholesterol levels, including total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides.
    • Why Is It Ordered: People with diabetes are at higher risk for cardiovascular diseases, and a lipid profile can provide insight into cardiovascular risk factors.
  5. Kidney Function Test:

    • Purpose: To evaluate kidney function.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Diabetes can lead to kidney damage (diabetic nephropathy), so monitoring kidney function is essential in diabetes management.
  6. Urine Albumin (Microalbuminuria Test):

    • Purpose: Detects small amounts of protein in the urine.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Early detection of kidney damage, which can be a complication of diabetes.
  7. Liver Function Tests:

    • Purpose: To assess liver health.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Liver diseases can impact glucose metabolism and are more common in individuals with diabetes.
  8. Complete Blood Count (CBC):

    • Purpose: To provide a general overview of health and detect conditions like anemia.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Diabetes and its complications can impact various blood components.
  9. Thyroid Function Tests (TSH, Free T3, Free T4):

    • Purpose: To assess thyroid function.
    • Why Is It Ordered: Thyroid disorders are more common in individuals with diabetes and can affect metabolic control.

These tests, when ordered alongside a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test, provide a comprehensive view of an individual’s blood sugar control, overall metabolic health, and potential complications of diabetes. They are essential in diagnosing, monitoring, and managing diabetes and related health conditions. The specific tests selected depend on the individual's medical history, current symptoms, and diabetes management plan.

Conditions where a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test is recommended:

The Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test is primarily used for individuals with diabetes or suspected diabetes. It helps in:

  1. Diabetes Diagnosis: The test aids in diagnosing diabetes by assessing long-term blood glucose control. An HbA1c level of 6.5% or higher is generally indicative of diabetes.

  2. Monitoring Diabetes Control: For individuals with diagnosed diabetes, the test is used to monitor blood sugar control and guide treatment decisions. The target HbA1c levels may vary depending on the individual's specific situation and treatment goals.

How does my healthcare provider use a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

Healthcare providers use the results of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test to:

  1. Evaluate Blood Sugar Control: The test provides an average measure of blood glucose levels, giving healthcare providers an understanding of how well blood sugar is being managed over time.

  2. Monitor Treatment Effectiveness: By tracking changes in HbA1c levels over time, healthcare providers can assess the effectiveness of diabetes treatment plans and make adjustments as needed.

  3. Guide Diabetes Management: The results help healthcare providers tailor treatment approaches, including lifestyle modifications, medication regimens, and recommendations for blood sugar monitoring.

It is essential to consult with a qualified healthcare professional to interpret the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test results properly and understand their implications in individual cases.

What does my Hemoglobin A1c test result mean?

HbA1c levels is currently reported as a percentage for monitoring glucose control, and it is suggested that most diabetics try to keep their hemoglobin A1c below 7%. The closer diabetics can keep their A1c to the therapeutic objective of less than 7% without experiencing abnormally low blood glucose, the better their diabetes is controlled. The risk of problems rises as the A1c rises.

However, a person with type 2 diabetes may have an A1c goal set by their healthcare professional. The length of time since diagnosis, the presence of other diseases as well as diabetes complications, the risk of hypoglycemia complications, life expectancy, and whether or not the person has a support system and healthcare resources readily available are all factors that may influence the goal.

For example, a person with heart disease who has had type 2 diabetes for many years without diabetic complications may have a higher A1c target set by their healthcare provider, whereas someone who is otherwise healthy and newly diagnosed may have a lower target set by their healthcare provider as long as low blood sugar is not a significant risk.

Most Common Questions About the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test:

Understanding the Test

What is the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

This test measures the amount of glucose attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. It provides an average of your blood glucose levels over the past 2-3 months. The eAG (estimated average glucose) is a calculation that translates the HbA1c percentage into the same units (mg/dL) used by glucose meters.

What is the purpose of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

The purpose is to monitor the long-term control of blood glucose levels in individuals with diabetes. It helps healthcare providers understand how well a person's diabetes has been managed over time and assists in guiding treatment plans.

Interpreting the Results

What is the normal range for the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

For individuals without diabetes, a normal HbA1c level is below 5.7%. Prediabetes is diagnosed between 5.7% and 6.4%. Diabetes is diagnosed when the HbA1c level is 6.5% or higher.

How do I interpret the eAG part of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

The eAG measurement is an estimation of a person's average blood glucose level over the past 2 to 3 months, expressed in the same units (mg/dL) as daily blood glucose monitoring. It's designed to help individuals better understand their diabetes control as it provides a number similar to those they see on their glucose meters.

Understanding the Implications

What does a high Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test result mean?

A high HbA1c level means that your blood glucose levels have been too high over the past few months. This may indicate poorly controlled diabetes and an increased risk of developing diabetes-related complications.

What does a low Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test result mean?

A low HbA1c level generally indicates good diabetes control, but if it is too low, it could mean that you're experiencing frequent episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Risks and Precautions

What factors can influence the results of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

Conditions that affect the lifespan of red blood cells, such as anemia, can impact the results. Certain ethnicities, like people of Mediterranean or African descent, may also have hemoglobin variants that interfere with the test.

Dealing with Abnormal Results

What are the next steps if my Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test results are abnormal?

If your results are abnormal, your healthcare provider may adjust your treatment plan, which could include changes to your diet, physical activity, or medications.

Discussion with Healthcare Provider

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider after receiving the results of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test?

Discuss your current treatment plan, the target range for your HbA1c level, and strategies for achieving or maintaining good glucose control.

Relationship with Other Tests

How does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test relate to daily glucose monitoring?

Daily glucose monitoring provides immediate information about glucose levels at a specific moment and allows timely adjustments to diet, activity, or medications. The HbA1c test gives a longer-term view, showing how well blood glucose has been controlled over several months.

Understanding the Test Components

Why does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test focus on hemoglobin?

Glucose in the bloodstream attaches to hemoglobin. As red blood cells live an average of 2-3 months, measuring the percentage of hemoglobin with attached glucose provides an estimate of average blood glucose levels over that period.

Beyond the Test

Can the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test be used to diagnose diabetes?

Yes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recognizes the HbA1c test as a diagnostic tool for diabetes and prediabetes.

Comparison with Other Tests

How does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test differ from the fasting glucose test?

The fasting glucose test measures blood glucose at a single point in time after an overnight fast, while the HbA1c test provides an average of blood glucose levels over the past 2-3 months. Both tests can be used to diagnose diabetes, but they provide different information.

Potential Next Steps

If my Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test results are high, will I need to start medication?

If your HbA1c levels are high, your healthcare provider may consider starting or adjusting medication, but lifestyle changes like diet and exercise modifications are also essential components of diabetes management.

Additional Information

Is the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test only for people with diabetes?

While the test is primarily used to manage diabetes, it's also used to diagnose the condition. People with risk factors for diabetes, such as obesity or a family history of diabetes, may also have this test performed.

Role in Health Management

How often should I have a Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test if I have diabetes?

The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes have an HbA1c test at least twice a year. Those who have recently changed their treatment, or who are not meeting their blood glucose goals, may be tested more frequently.

How does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test help in managing my diabetes?

The HbA1c test provides a "big picture" view of blood glucose control. It helps in assessing the effectiveness of current management strategies and guiding any necessary adjustments in treatment.

Specific Populations

Is the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test useful in gestational diabetes?

The HbA1c test is not typically used for gestational diabetes screening or diagnosis because it reflects long-term glucose control, while gestational diabetes develops and is diagnosed during pregnancy.

Can the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test be used in pediatric patients?

Yes, the test can be used in children, and it's especially useful for managing type 1 diabetes, as it helps monitor long-term glucose control.

How reliable is the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test in older adults?

The test is just as reliable in older adults as it is in younger individuals. However, healthcare providers may consider an older person's overall health and comorbidities when interpreting the results.

Clinical Interpretation

How does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test measure long-term blood glucose control?

Since glucose binds to hemoglobin in red blood cells, and these cells have a lifespan of around 120 days, the percentage of hemoglobin bound with glucose reflects the average blood glucose over that period.

Why does the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test not require fasting?

Because the test reflects the average blood glucose over several months, it's not affected by recent food intake.

Therapeutic Monitoring

If my Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test results are in the target range, does it mean my diabetes is cured?

No, an HbA1c within the target range indicates good control of diabetes, not a cure. It's essential to continue following your treatment plan even when your HbA1c is in the target range.

What is the role of the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG test in the management of type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

In both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, the HbA1c test plays a vital role in monitoring long-term glucose control, assessing the effectiveness of the treatment plan, and guiding necessary adjustments.

Why is it important to maintain the Hemoglobin A1c with eAG levels within the recommended range?

Maintaining HbA1c levels within the recommended range significantly reduces the risk of complications associated with diabetes, including nerve damage, kidney disease, eye problems, and cardiovascular disease.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: A1c with eAG, Glycated Hemoglobin, Glycohemoglobin, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, HA1c, HbA1c, Hemoglobin A1c, Hgb A1c

Eag (Mg/Dl)

A1C test result as eAG, or "average glucose," which directly correlates to your A1C. eAG may help you understand your A1C value because eAG is a unit similar to what you see regularly through self-monitoring on your meter. A1C is reported as a percent (7% for example) and eAG uses the same units (mg/dl) as your glucose meters. - See more at: http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/a1c/#sthash.FHieCgVE.dpuf

Eag (Mmol/L)

Accesses long term diabetic control in diabetes mellitus.

Hemoglobin A1c

The A1c test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the last 2 to 3 months. It does this by measuring the concentration of glycated (also often called glycosylated) hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin is an oxygen-transporting protein found inside red blood cells (RBCs). There are several types of normal hemoglobin, but the predominant form – about 95-98% – is hemoglobin A. As glucose circulates in the blood, some of it spontaneously binds to hemoglobin A. The hemoglobin molecules with attached glucose are called glycated hemoglobin. The higher the concentration of glucose in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin is formed. Once the glucose binds to the hemoglobin, it remains there for the life of the red blood cell – normally about 120 days. The predominant form of glycated hemoglobin is referred to as HbA1c or A1c. A1c is produced on a daily basis and slowly cleared from the blood as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test is used to monitor treatment in someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes. It helps to evaluate how well their glucose levels have been controlled by treatment over time. This test may be used to screen for and diagnose diabetes or risk of developing diabetes. In 2010, clinical practice guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) stated that A1c may be added to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an option for diabetes screening and diagnosis. For monitoring purposes, an A1c of less than 7% indicates good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics. However, in 2012, the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) issued a position statement recommending that the management of glucose control in type 2 diabetes be more "patient-centered." Data from recent studies have shown that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause complications and that people with risk of severe hypoglycemia, underlying health conditions, complications, and a limited life expectancy do not necessarily benefit from having a stringent goal of less than 7% for their A1c. The statement recommends that people work closely with their doctor to select a goal that reflects each person's individual health status and that balances risks and benefits.
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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