Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea Testing and health information

Our Gonorrhea test can detect infections before gonorrhea symptoms and serious consequences occur.  Learn more in this complete guide to gonorrhea treatment.


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Description: The chlamydia and gonorrhea test is used to determine if a person has been infected with either of the sexually transmitted infections. It can be used to diagnose a person with chlamydia or gonorrhea for treatment.

Also Known As: Chlamydia Trachomatis Test, Chlamydia STD Test, GC Test, Neisseria Gonorrhoeae test, Gonorrhoeae test, gonorrhea and chlamydia test

Collection Method: Urine Collection

Specimen Type: Urine

Test Preparation: Urine specimens: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

When is a Chlamydia and Gonorrhea test ordered?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, all sexually active women younger than 25 and sexually active women 25 and older who are at elevated risk should have a yearly chlamydia and gonorrhea screening. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the US Preventive Services Task Force both urge routine screening for these women.

The CDC recommends that males who have intercourse with other men get tested for gonorrhea and chlamydia at least once a year. For sexually active, heterosexual men with no symptoms, health organizations do not advocate routine screening. When there is a large number of cases of STDs in the community, for example, healthcare providers may prescribe screening to their patients.

When a person’s sexual partner has been diagnosed with gonorrhea or chlamydia or when a person has signs and symptoms of the infection, chlamydia testing may be performed.

Women and men who have been treated for chlamydia should be tested again three months afterwards.

What does a Chlamydia and Gonorrhea urine test check for?

Chlamydia is one of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections in the United States, and if left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences. Chlamydia testing determines whether the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis is to blame for an infection. In order to avoid long-term consequences and the spread of the infection to others, it’s critical to screen for, diagnose, and treat chlamydia.

Chlamydia infections are most common among people aged 15 to 24. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2.86 million Americans contract chlamydia each year, and women are commonly re-infected if their partners do not seek treatment. Because many people don’t have any symptoms and don’t get tested and identified, the true number of cases may be larger. Despite this, each year over one million new cases are reported.

Sexual contact with an infected partner is the most common way for chlamydia to spread. Multiple sex partners, coinfection or previous infection with another STD, and not wearing a condom appropriately and consistently are also risk factors.

Many people with chlamydia infections have no symptoms, while others may only have minor ones. Because the signs and symptoms of chlamydia are similar to those of another STD, gonorrhea, and can be misinterpreted, testing for both diseases are frequently performed at the same time.

Antibiotics are commonly used to treat chlamydia. It can cause serious reproductive and other health problems if not recognized and addressed.

In women, untreated chlamydia infections that originate on the cervix but progress to the fallopian tubes and ovaries can cause pelvic inflammatory disease.

Men who are not treated may become infertile in rare cases.

If not diagnosed and treated, gonorrhea is a common bacterial sexually transmitted illness that can lead to serious consequences. Gonorrhea testing determines whether a person's infection is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The importance of gonorrhea screening, diagnosis, and treatment in reducing long-term consequences and the spread of the infection to others cannot be overstated.

More than 820,000 people in the United States contract new gonorrheal infections each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but only about half of these infections are reported to the CDC. In the United States, sexually active teenagers, young adults, and African Americans have the highest reported rates of infection.

Sexual contact with an infected partner is the most common way for gonorrhea to spread. Multiple sex partners, coinfection or previous infection with another STD, and not wearing a condom appropriately and consistently are also risk factors.

While some males with gonorrhea will experience symptoms, the majority of women will not or will confuse gonorrhea symptoms with those of a bladder or other vaginal illness. Symptoms in men usually emerge 2 to 5 days after infection, but they can take up to 30 days. Symptoms usually appear within 10 days of infection for women. Because the signs and symptoms of gonorrhea are similar to those of another STD, chlamydia, and can be misinterpreted, testing for both diseases are sometimes performed at the same time.

Antibiotics are generally prescribed to treat gonorrhea. Gonorrhea can have catastrophic consequences if it is not recognized and treated.

Untreated gonorrhea infections in women can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, which can develop days to months after infection and cause consequences.

Untreated gonorrhea can spread to the blood or joints, leading to disseminated gonococcal infection, a dangerous illness. Fever, numerous skin lesions, severe joint swelling, inflammation of the membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord, and infection of the inner lining of the heart are all signs of DGI. In infants born to infected moms, DGI symptoms include arthritis, meningitis, and sepsis, a serious, life-threatening illness.

Antibiotics identical to those used to treat simple gonorrhea might be used to successfully treat DGI. Treatment-resistant gonorrhea, on the other hand, is becoming more common. To treat all uncomplicated gonococcal infections in adults and adolescents in the United States, CDC guidelines presently recommend dual therapy with ceftriaxone and azithromycin. If a patient's symptoms do not improve following therapy, a healthcare provider may need to do additional tests, including susceptibility testing.

Lab tests often ordered with a Chlamydia and Gonorrhea test:

  • HIV Antibody
  • HIV Antigen
  • Syphilis
  • Herpes 1 and 2

Conditions where a Chlamydia and Gonorrhea test is recommended:

  • Gonorrhea
  • HIV
  • Herpes 1 and 2
  • Syphilis
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Infertility
  • Vaginitis
  • Vaginosis

How does my health care provider use a Chlamydia and Gonorrhea test?

Chlamydia and gonorrhea testing is used to detect, diagnose, and confirm that infections caused by the bacteria Chlamydia trachomatis have been successfully treated. Chlamydia and gonorrhea are two of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, and if left untreated, it can lead to serious consequences. To avoid long-term consequences and the spread of the infections to others, it's critical to screen for, diagnose, and treat chlamydia.

Because the illnesses produced by these two bacteria might have similar signs and symptoms, testing for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae is frequently done at the same time. Both of these bacteria can be acquired at the same time, and a person can get infected with both. Because the two infections require distinct antibiotic treatments, a clear diagnosis is critical. Testing should be done again to determine that the treatment was effective. After a person has completed therapy, this is done roughly three months later.

What do my chlamydia and gonorrhea test results mean?

A positive result indicates that you have an active infection that requires antibiotic therapy.

A negative result simply means that no infection was present at the time of the test. It is critical for those who are at a higher risk of infection to have annual screening tests to check for infection, especially since re-infection is common, especially among teenagers.

If you're infected, your sexual partner(s) should get tested and treated as well.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.


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Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA 

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimen: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

2 mL urine using APTIMA® Urine Specimen Collection Kit.

Alternative Specimen(s) 

Urine (no preservatives): 2 mL of urine, specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® Urine Transport Medium within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed • ThinPrep® vial • SurePath™ vial

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube label.

Transport Container 

APTIMA® Transport tube


If you're worried about a possible urinary tract infection, our STD Urinary Tract Infection Panel can give you the answers you need. This panel includes tests for chlamydia and gonorrhea, two of the most common STDs, as well as a urinalysis to check for other potential infections. With quick and accurate results, you can get the peace of mind you need to move on with your life.

The STD Urinary Tract Infection Panel contains the following tests:

  • Chlamydia and Gonorrhea
  • Urinalysis, Complete


It might be scary or difficult to think about, but if you've even had one sexual partner, there's a chance you have a sexually transmitted infection or disease (STI or STD). Among STIs and STDs, gonorrhea is among the top three most common in the United States.

The gonorrhea CDC fact sheet estimates that there were about 1.6 million new gonorrhea infections in 2018 alone, most of which happened to people in the 15-24 age bracket.

These statistics make people uncomfortable, but they underscore how important it is to get regularly tested. A gonorrhea test is quick and easy, so there's no reason to hesitate.

To assess your chances and understand the infection and disease, read this article about what gonorrhea is and how you can seek diagnosis and treatment.

What Is Gonorrhea?

Gonorrhea is a common STI in the United States, only beat out by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and chlamydia. Sexual interactions mostly spread sexually transmitted infections and diseases. However, these diseases can spread in other ways in rare cases.

Gonorrhea, much like other STIs, also does not only affect the genital areas. While the genital area is the most common area to show signs and symptoms of an infection, the infection can occur elsewhere or spread to another area. For gonorrhea, the genital area, rectum, and throat can all show signs and symptoms of an infection.

Left untreated, gonorrhea can lead to more serious, permanent health conditions. Women can develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and experience ectopic pregnancies, infertility, blocked fallopian tubes, and chronic pain. Men can develop chronic pain and infertility. Additionally, it increases the chances of catching HIV.

Risk Factors for Gonorrhea

If you are sexually active, you are at risk for gonorrhea, among many other STIs and STDs. The only way to completely avoid catching gonorrhea is to abstain from sexual interactions. Both men and women are equally able to catch gonorrhea, although lifestyle choices can affect the likelihood of catching it.

As with all other STDs and STIs, your risk for catching gonorrhea increases with your increased number of sexual interactions and partners.

Men who are sexually active and have sex with other men should seek testing at least once every year. Women under 25 or who have new or multiple sex partners are also advised to get tested at least yearly. If you fit into these categories, you are at high risk.

Your risk of infection also increases if you are having unprotected sex. While it is possible to transmit STIs and STDs while still protected, there is a much smaller chance of transmission.

People who have been in committed, long-term monogamous relationships and have tested negative are generally safe from STIs.

Causes of Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea is one of the oldest STIs on record. It was originally coined "gonorrhea" by a Greek physician, Galen, before 200 AD. Despite not having its official name, gonorrhea is likely to predate Galen due to many previous references to the disease going back all the way to 2600 BC.

Because of its ancient nature, it's difficult to understand the origins of the disease.

With modern science, we can understand that gonorrhea is mostly caused by having sexual interactions with someone who has already been infected. Gonorrhea can be easily transferred to a sexual partner through vaginal, anal, and oral sex.

In unfortunate cases, pregnant women can pass on gonorrhea infections to their children through birth.

Signs and Symptoms of Gonorrhea

The signs and symptoms of gonorrhea can slightly differ for men and women and the source of infection. It is important to understand that gonorrhea, much like many other STIs, might not show symptoms at first. Many people become infected without knowing and continue to have sex. This lack of early detection is what makes gonorrhea so common and so risky.

Gonorrhea from vaginal sex can cause painful sex, swollen lymph nodes around the groin, painful urination, and unusual discharge for both men and women. Men could also experience swollen testicles, while women could experience bleeding between periods.

If you have gotten gonorrhea from oral sex (or in rare cases, if you've kissed someone with oral gonorrhea), you can experience:

  • Red, sore throat
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck
  • Fever

If you've gotten gonorrhea from anal sex, you could experience:

  • Rectal discharge
  • Rectal itching or soreness
  • Painful bowel movements
  • Rectal bleeding

If you're at all concerned that you're showing these symptoms, you need to see a doctor right away.

How Is Gonorrhea Diagnosed?

Gonorrhea can be easily diagnosed by a healthcare professional who orders a test and analyzes the results. Tests can be done on urine. If gonorrhea is caught early, it can be treated and will vanish quickly with prescription antibiotics.

Tests for Gonorrhea

A commercial urine test from Ulta Lab Tests is a highly accurate and reliable way to get a diagnosis and next steps from your health care provider. Some of the benefits of buying a gonorrhea urine test are:

  • Secure online results
  • No need for insurance
  • No referral requirements
  • Great pricing
  • Satisfaction 100% guaranteed

Get Started with Gonorrhea Testing

The causes and symptoms of gonorrhea are very similar to many other STIs and STDs, but the results can be very different. Left undetected and untreated, gonorrhea can lead to serious, permanent health conditions. That's why it's so important to get tested often and seek treatment immediately.

Ulta Lab Tests can become a part of your regimen for pristine sexual health. We offer tests with high accuracy without the embarrassing swabbing of most STD tests. In turn, you can make informed decisions about your health.

You can save yourself the embarrassment of an STD appointment with your doctor by getting tested privately.

Order your Gonorrhea test today to get confidential results online within the next two days!

Take control of your health with Ulta Lab Tests.