Heart Health

Find the right heart health tests with Ulta Lab Tests to screen for and monitor your cardiovascular health with an accurate reading of your results sent confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours. Order from Ulta Lab Tests today! 


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Clopidogrel (Plavix®) is metabolized by CYP2C19 to its active form. This assay detects loss-of-function variants in the CYP2C19 gene leading to reduced therapeutic response to Clopidogrel treatment.

Warfarin (Coumadin®) therapy is associated with significant complications because of its narrow therapeutic index and large interpatient dosage variation necessary to achieve an optimal therapeutic response. This variation is due to both genetic and environmental factors. A promoter variant (-1639 G?A) of the Vitamin K epoxide complex subunit 1 (VCR) accounts for 25%-44% of this variability and variants of the cytochrome P enzyme C (SPCA) account for 10%-15% of this variability. Identification of these warfarin sensitive variants of the VKORC1 and the CYP2C9 genes may allow a more individualized therapy and reduced risk of bleeding complications.


To screen for APC-R associated with venous thromboembolic disorders.

ADAMTS-13 is a zinc metalloprotease that cleaves ultra large vWF multimers. Studies have shown that low levels of ADAMTS-13 activity are associated with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), a life-threatening hematological condition characterized by a low platelet count, microvascular thrombi, red cell fragmentation, and renal complications. Congenital TTP is a rare inherited disease caused by mutations within the ADAMTS-13 gene, which result in the production of non-functional protein. The acquired form of TTP is an autoimmune-like disorder caused by the development of autoantibodies to ADAMTS-13 that inhibits enzyme activity.  

Additional test processing fees will be charged if initial results dictate Reflex (further) testing.


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The adiponectin ELISA assay quantitatively measures human adiponectin in serum. It has been shown that decreased expression of adiponectin correlates with insulin resistance. Adiponectin appears to be a potent insulin enhancer linking adipose tissue and whole body glucose metabolism.





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Aids in the diagnosis of primary disease of skeletal muscle myocardial infarction and viral hepatitis.

Alpha 2-Antiplasmin inhibits the action of plasmin. Inherited deficiency may lead to bruising and bleeding. The test may also be useful in monitoring substitution therapy.

Antinuclear antibodies are associated with rheumatic diseases including Systemic Lupus Erythematous (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease, Sjogren's syndrome, scleroderma, polymyositis, CREST syndrome, and neurologic SLE. 

Reflex Information: If ANA Screen, IFA is positive, then ANA Titer and Pattern will be performed at an additional charge.


Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) converts Angiotensin I to Angiotensin II. Angiotensin II exerts a negative feedback control of renin release. Angiotensin II, along with direct renin, is useful in the classification of patients with hypertension.

The ATR1 receptor gene polymorphism is associated with increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular risk. Substantial increase in the c allele frequency was observed among patients with severe hypertension, particularly among individuals carrying dd ACE genotype.

Apolipoprotein A1 (APO A1) has been reported to be a better predictor than HDL cholesterol and triglycerides for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Low levels of APO A1 in serum are associated with increased risk of CAD. The measurement of APO A1 may be of value in identifying patients with atherosclerosis.

Apolipoprotein A1 (APO A1) has been reported to be a better predictor than HDL cholesterol and triglycerides for Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Low levels of APO A1 in serum are associated with increased risk of CAD. The measurement of APO A1 may be of value in identifying patients with atherosclerosis. Apolipoprotein B (APO B) has been reported to be a more powerful indicator of CAD than total cholesterol or LDL cholesterol in angiographic CAD and in survivors of myocardial infarction. In some patients with CAD, APO B is elevated even in the presence of normal LDL cholesterol.

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Apolipoprotein B (APO B) has been reported to be a powerful indicator of CAD. In some patients with CAD, APO B is elevated even in the presence of normal LDL cholesterol.

Aspirin (which inhibits platelet cyclo-oxygenase) reduces the risk of thrombosis in cardiovascular disease by impairing platelet function. Patients who do not respond to the platelet inhibitory effects of aspirin are designated as "ASPIRIN RESISTANT". The measurement of 11-DEHYDROTHROMBOXANE B2 in urine (the principal metabolite of platelet cyclo-oxygenase derived thromboxane B2) indicates lack of aspirin responsiveness.

BNP is increased in congestive heart failure, left ventricular hypertrophy, acute myocardial infarction, coronary angioplasty, and hypertension. Elevations are also observed in pulmonary hypertension (indicating right ventricular dysfunction), acute lung injury, hypervolemic states, chronic renal failure and cirrhosis. Decreasing levels indicate therapeutic response to anti-hypertensive therapy.

Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) Useful in predicting risk for cardiovascular disease.


This test will aid physicians in the assessment of risk of atrial fibrilation and cardioembolic stroke.

This test will aid in the assessment of risk associated with myocardial infarction (MI), especially before age 50 in males and age 60 in females.

This test determines the subtypes of apoe which will aid in the risk assessment of corornary heart disease (CHD) and hyperlipoproteinemia.


Heart disease is the world's biggest killer. It accounted for 20 million deaths in 2019 alone.

This has shown us more and more just how important heart health is to overall health. If you aren't checking and taking care of your heart health, you could be developing heart disease right now.

The best way to check your heart health is to get heart health tests. These blood tests can detect biomarkers related to heart health.

To learn more about these tests and how you can take care of your heart, keep reading.

What Is Heart Health?

Heart health refers to the physical condition of your heart muscle. The better you take care of your body, the better your heart will be. Better heart health lowers your risk for developing a myriad of heart conditions:

  • Blood vessel diseases like coronary artery disease
  • Infections of the heart muscle
  • Heart valve disease
  • Problems with your heart's rhythm
  • Diseases in your heart muscle

To avoid developing these kinds of conditions, you need to make sure that you're taking care of yourself. This means you need to eat right, exercise often, avoid stress, and see your physician regularly.

Other than these conditions, some patients may also have congenital heart defects. These are conditions that a patient is born with. Most of these congenital conditions are physical heart deformities.

Risk Factors for Poor Heart Health

Since heart conditions are the number one killer of people worldwide, researchers have conducted thousands of studies on the heart. As a result of all of this research, professionals have found a lot of risk factors for poor heart health:

  • Age: your risk for heart-related illnesses rises with age as your heart muscle weakens.
  • Sex: men are at a greater risk for developing heart conditions, although the risk for women increases after menopause.
  • Family History: you're more likely to develop a heart condition if one of your immediate relatives has/had a heart-related diagnosis, especially if they received the diagnosis at a young age.
  • Smoking: smoking restricts your blood vessels, leading to lower blood volume and high blood pressure, which can cause blockages in the arteries (atherosclerosis) and damage the heart over time.
  • Poor Diet: researchers have linked diets with high levels of fat, salt, sugar, and/or cholesterol to heart conditions.
  • Lack of Exercise: your heart is a muscle, and you need to work out so that it can be strong enough to sustain your blood flow.

Although you can't control your family history, age, or biological sex, you can help your heart health in other ways by adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet, exercising more, and avoiding smoking. Your heart will thank you later.

Pre-Existing Conditions That May Impact Heart Health

Some pre-existing conditions are linked to heart conditions. Because these kinds of chronic illnesses are linked, it's important to keep each one under control before it leads to worse things like heart failure.

Let's review some of the most common conditions that can affect your heart health.

Those with the pre-existing condition of hypertension are more likely to develop heart conditions as uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to narrowed blood vessels. If you have hypercholesterolemia (high levels of cholesterol), it can cause plaque formation in the blood vessels that can lead to atherosclerosis

Excess weight can also put unnecessary strain on the heart. So, if you're overweight or obese, the excess weight could be causing slow damage over time.

Because diabetes is tied to risk factors such as obesity and high blood pressure, many scientists have found it to also be related to heart conditions.

Poor dental health is another thing to look out for. Bacteria that cause conditions like endocarditis come in through the mouth, and good dental hygiene is the first defense against them.

Lastly, too much stress can damage your arteries over time due to elevated cortisol levels in the blood.

If you are currently dealing with any of these conditions, make sure that your primary physician knows. With this information, they can take better care of you and watch out for further complications.

If you do happen to develop a heart condition due to any of these conditions, you should listen to your doctor closely. A heart condition doesn't have to be what kills you. There are ways that you can help to reverse the condition and stop it from getting worse.

Causes of Heart Diseases

The causes of heart disease depending on the kind of disease that you have. There are many kinds that a patient can develop.

Let's review the most common causes of each kind of heart disease.

Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) develops from a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries (atherosclerosis).

Abnormal rhythms, also known as arrhythmias, can form as a result of many conditions. These include CAD, diabetes, drug abuse, chronic stress, valvular disease, medications or supplements, high blood pressure, smoking, excessive alcohol or caffeine, and congenital defects.

Cardiomyopathy, the thickening of the heart muscle, can form from a widened left ventricle (dilated cardiomyopathy), reduced elasticity of the heart muscle (restrictive cardiomyopathy), or a genetic predisposition (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy).

Heart infection can develop after exposure to certain bacteria, viruses, or parasites.

Valvular heart conditions can be congenital. However, some people develop them after rheumatic diseases, infections, or connective tissue disorders.

Lastly, congenital heart conditions can develop due to genetics, medications that the mother took, or maternal health conditions.

Your heart is one of the most vital organs in your body. Because it is connected to so many systemic conditions, there are many risk factors and causes that you need to keep in mind as you're making daily life choices. 

If you fear that you're at risk for developing one or more of these conditions, you should talk to your healthcare provider.

What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Heart Diseases?

It's difficult to pin down a cardiac patient. Some presentations may be obvious such as those where a patient is clutching their chest. However, others aren't so obvious, like those where a patient is complaining of nausea.

Because of the close proximity and how the heart works, signs or symptoms of heart diseases can form all over the body. Here are some of the most common:

  • Chest pain, tightness, pressure, and/or discomfort
  • Shortness of breath
  • Pain in the neck, jaw, throat, upper back, or upper abdomen
  • Pain, numbness, or weakness in your arms and/or legs
  • A fluttering feeling in your chest
  • A fast or slow heart rate
  • Lightheadedness
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting
  • Pale gray or blue skin color
  • Easily tiring during exercise or other physical activity
  • Easily becoming short of breath during exercise or other physical activity
  • Swelling in the legs, ankles, and/or feet
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Generalized weakness
  • Persistent dry cough
  • Skin rashes

The signs of symptoms of heart conditions exist all over the entire body. Because of all of these manifestations, it's important to get your heart health checked often. A small rash could be a cry for help from your heart.

How Is Heart Health Measured?

There are three main ways that healthcare providers check your heart health at a checkup:

  1. Heart rate
  2. Blood pressure
  3. Lab work

First is your heart rate. Your heartbeat shouldn't be too fast or too slow. The rate that it beats tells the physician how often your heart is pumping blood out to the rest of your body.

Next is your blood pressure. This tells the physician how much pressure the blood in your body is putting on the walls of your arteries. Systolic blood pressure (the top number) tells them how much pressure is in your arteries when your heart squeezes, while diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) tells them the pressure when your heart relaxes.

Finally, physicians will order lab tests to check your heart health along with the health of systems related to your heart.

The Lab Tests to Screen, Diagnose, and Monitor for One's Heart Health

Since your heart affects your entire body, there are plenty of blood tests to check heart health. Our advanced, comprehensive heart health tests look at the following biomarkers:

  • Lp-PLA2 - inflammation marker specific to the heart
  • Lipoprotein (a) - a risk factor for developing heart disease
  • Apolipoprotein A1 - a protein that plays a role in lipid metabolism
  • Apolipoprotein B - a protein that is involved in lipid metabolism
  • MTHFR Mutation - tests for the potential for cardiac enzymes to mutate
  • Hs-CRP - finds lower levels of general inflammation in the body
  • LDL Cholesterol - the "bad" cholesterol that we want low levels of
  • Lipid Panel - looks for abnormalities in lipid levels
  • Fibrinogen - looks for acute inflammation or tissue damage
  • Homocysteine - signals vitamin deficiencies in the body
  • Complete Blood Count - reviews levels of blood cells
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel - covers electrolytes and organ function
  • BNP - a hormone produced by your heart
  • Lactate dehydrogenase - an enzyme involved in energy production
  • Cystatin C w/ eGFR - checks for normal kidney function
  • Hemoglobin A1C - a measurement of your average blood sugar over the past few months
  • Insulin - the amount of glucose-suppressing hormone you have in your body
  • Lipoprotein fractionation - a measurement of the lipids in the body
  • Myeloperoxidase Antibody (MPO) - an antibody associated with a higher risk for cardiac problems
  • Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acids - a healthy source of energy for the body
  • Vitamin D-25-Hydroxy - measurement of the amount of Vitamin D in the body

With the results of all of these heart health lab tests, you'll be able to tell whether or not you currently have or maybe are developing any heart conditions.

Remember, getting this kind of lab work early can help improve your prognosis or future outcome. If you can catch the damage early, you can prevent further damage and even reverse the damage that's been done.

Get Your Heart Health Tests With Ulta Lab Tests

So, what are you waiting for? Your heart is one of the most important organs in your body. It works 24/7 for you.

You need to take care of it.

Ulta Lab Tests offers tests that are highly accurate and reliable, so you can make informed decisions about your health.

  • Secure and confidential results
  • No insurance referral is needed
  • Affordable pricing
  • 100% satisfaction guarantee

Order your heart health tests today, and your results will be provided to you securely and confidentially online in 24 to 48 hours for most tests.

Take control of your health today with Ulta Lab Tests.