Saccharomyces cerevisiae Antibodies (ASCA) (IgG)

The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Antibodies (ASCA) (IgG) test contains 1 test with 1 biomarker.

Brief Description: The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test, commonly abbreviated as ASCA IgG, is a laboratory test used to detect the presence of IgG antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a species of yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used in baking and brewing but can also serve as an antigen that triggers an immune response in certain individuals, leading to the production of ASCA IgG antibodies.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When and Why the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody Test May Be Ordered

This test is often ordered in the context of gastrointestinal symptoms when there's a suspicion of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Key reasons include:

  1. Differentiating Crohn's Disease from Ulcerative Colitis: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are the two primary types of IBD. While they share many symptoms, their treatment and prognosis can differ. The presence of ASCA IgG antibodies is more commonly associated with Crohn's disease.

  2. Symptomatic Presentation: If a patient presents with symptoms consistent with IBD, such as chronic diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, or blood in the stool, the test might be ordered as part of a diagnostic workup.

  3. Family History: Individuals with a family history of IBD might undergo this test if they begin showing symptoms indicative of the condition.

What the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody Test Checks For

The test checks for the presence and concentration of IgG antibodies directed against Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the bloodstream. Elevated levels of these antibodies are suggestive of an immune response against this yeast and are more commonly seen in individuals with Crohn's disease.

Other Lab Tests Ordered Alongside the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody Test

Doctors may order several tests in conjunction to get a comprehensive view:

  • pANCA (Perinuclear Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies) Test: This test is often ordered alongside the ASCA IgG test. While ASCA IgG is associated with Crohn's disease, pANCA is more commonly linked with ulcerative colitis.

  • Complete Blood Count (CBC): To check for signs of anemia or inflammation.

  • C-reactive Protein (CRP) and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR): These tests assess the level of inflammation in the body and can be indicative of active IBD.

Conditions or Diseases that Require the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody Test

  • Crohn's Disease: The primary condition linked with positive ASCA IgG results.

Usage of Results from the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody Test by Health Care Providers

Health care providers use the results of the ASCA IgG test in the following ways:

  • Diagnostic Tool: A positive result, especially when combined with clinical symptoms and other supporting lab findings, can help confirm a diagnosis of Crohn's disease.

  • Differential Diagnosis: The test aids in distinguishing Crohn's disease from ulcerative colitis, especially when used alongside other diagnostic modalities and tests.

In summary, the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test is a valuable tool in the workup of inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly in distinguishing between the major subtypes of IBD.

Most Common Questions About the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test:

Purpose and Clinical Indications

What is the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test designed for?

The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test is designed to detect the presence of IgG antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae (often referred to as baker's or brewer's yeast) in the blood. The presence of these antibodies can be indicative of certain inflammatory bowel diseases, particularly Crohn's disease.

Why would a physician order the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test?

A physician may order this test if a patient presents with symptoms suggestive of an inflammatory bowel disease, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The test can aid in differentiating between Crohn's disease and other conditions, such as ulcerative colitis.

Interpretation of Results

How are the results of the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test interpreted?

A positive result indicates the presence of IgG antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This can be suggestive of Crohn's disease, but it's important to note that the test is not definitive. A positive result should be interpreted in conjunction with clinical findings, other laboratory results, and imaging studies.

What does a negative result in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test signify?

A negative result means that there are no detectable IgG antibodies against Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the blood sample. While this reduces the likelihood of Crohn's disease, it does not entirely rule it out. Clinical judgment is crucial in diagnosis.

Implications and Medical Management

If a patient tests positive for the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test, what are the potential next steps?

A positive test indicates a potential diagnosis of Crohn's disease. The physician may recommend additional tests, such as colonoscopy or imaging studies, to confirm the diagnosis. Once diagnosed, treatment may include medications to reduce inflammation, manage symptoms, or both.

How does the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test compare to other diagnostic methods for Crohn's disease?

The Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test is one of several tools that can aid in diagnosing Crohn's disease. While it offers specificity, it's not as sensitive as some other markers. Colonoscopy, imaging studies, and other blood tests can provide complementary information and help in forming a comprehensive diagnosis.

Post-Test Management

Can the levels of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG antibodies change over time, and does this have any clinical significance?

Yes, the levels can change over time. A decrease in antibody levels could be suggestive of disease remission or the effectiveness of treatment. Conversely, an increase could indicate a flare-up or the presence of active disease. Regular monitoring might be recommended, depending on the clinical scenario.

How often should a patient undergo the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae IgG Antibody test if they have been diagnosed with Crohn's disease?

The frequency of testing varies based on individual patient needs, the course of the disease, and the treatment regimen. Some physicians might use it as a monitoring tool, especially in conjunction with other markers or tests, while others might rely on clinical symptoms and imaging to track disease progression or remission. It's crucial to have regular follow-ups with the treating physician to determine the best course of action.

We advise having your results reviewed by a licensed medical healthcare professional for proper interpretation of your results.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Saccharomyces cerevisiae Antibodies ASCA IgG

S Cerevisiae Ab (IgG)

*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

Customer Reviews