Immunity & Titer Panels - [SAVE 20%]



Are you immune to common diseases?

Learn your overall immunity with a blood titer that checks if you have had an infection or are immune to a disease. Immunity can occur from having a vaccination or contracting the disease.

Save 20% on Immunity & Titer lab tests and lab panels and learn the status of your immunity and your blood titers across various diseases that include Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Chicken Pox, Varicella- Zoster (Shingles), Tetanus and Diphtheria, and Hepatitis. 


  • Promotion Code:
  • ULTAIT20

Most Popular

Immunity Panel

The Immunity Panel combines several common titer immunity tests for additional savings.  These tests are often ordered when someone needs proof of their immune status to common infectious diseases for work or school.  It may also be ordered for pregnant women as part of their prenatal testing. 

This package includes titers for: 

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Quantitative
  • MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella)
  • Varicella-Zoster Virus Antibody (IgG)

For a testing package which also includes Hepatitis A, please see our Immunity Panel Plus.

 


Immunity Panel Plus

The Immunity Panel Plus combines several common titer immunity tests for additional savings.  These tests are often ordered when someone needs proof of their immune status to common infectious diseases for work or school.  It may also be ordered for pregnant women as part of their prenatal testing. 

This package includes titers for:

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody, Quantitative
  • MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella)
  • Varicella-Zoster Virus Antibody (IgG)

Please note that the Hepatitis A Total Antibodies test included in this package does not provide numerical results.  Results for this test will be positive or negative only.


NEW - SARS-CoV-2 Antibody (IgG), Spike, Semi-Quantitative

IMPORTANT - Test collection is available only to patients who: are asymptomatic; have been asymptomatic for at least 10 days; lack a fever (as assessed by non-contact thermometer checks at time of visit); and are wearing a face mask.

THIS IS NOT A TEST FOR AN ACTIVE INFECTION

Patients suspected of having or confirmed to have active COVID-19 infection or disease may not visit Quest patient service centers, which are not equipped to collect the necessary respiratory specimens for molecular COVID-19 diagnostic testing. Patients who believe they may have COVID-19 are strongly encouraged to contact their healthcare provider.

"This test checks for a type of antibody called immunoglobulin G (IgG) that is the result of past or recent exposure to COVID-19, also known as the novel coronavirus. The human body produces IgG antibodies as part of the immune response to the virus. It usually takes around 10 to 18 days to produce enough antibodies to be detected in the blood.

Test results may help identify if you were previously exposed to the virus and, if exposed, can check whether or not your body has produced antibodies. Antibodies typically suggest protective immunity after you’ve recovered or been exposed to COVID-19. However, evidence is still being collected to determine if IgG antibodies provide protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19 infection.

If you were never diagnosed with COVID-19, this test can help determine if you may have been previously exposed to the virus.

If you were diagnosed with COVID-19, this test can check whether or not your body has produced antibodies.

Multiple sources, including the CDC and healthcare experts, recommend you discuss your test results and whether to return to work with your healthcare provider and employer.


PATIENT SERVICE CENTERS - COVID-19 Antibody (IgG) testing requirements.

1. A FACE MASK IS REQUIRED

2. AN APPOINTMENT IS REQUIRED - For the safety of patients and employees, Quest has limited appointment times for COVID-19 Antibody (IgG) testing.


NEW! SARS-CoV-2 Antibody (IgG), Spike, Semi-Quantitative

A SARS-CoV-2 semi-quantitative IgG test result is reported as positive at an index3 of ≥1.00. This positive result indicates that an individual has developed an immune response to a SARS-CoV-2 infection or a SARS-CoV-2 spike vaccine within the limits of the assay.

Conversely, a negative result is reported at an index4 of <1.00. A negative semi- quantitative antibody result means that the patient serum specimen had no SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG antibodies, or that the relative level of antibodies in the patient specimen was below the index cutoff.

• Estimated sensitivity of 99.9% based on positive percent agreement (PPA) and specificity of 99.9%, based on negative percent agreement (NPA).


Clinical Significance

SARS-CoV-2 Antibody (IgG), Spike, Semi-Quantitative - The results of this semi-quantitative test should not be interpreted as an indication or degree of immunity or protection from reinfection. Individuals that have been vaccinated with a SARS-CoV-2 spike or receptor-binding domain vaccine may be positive in this test, and their sero-positivity may or may not be due to a SARS-CoV-2 infection.
This test is intended as an aid in identifying individuals with an adaptive immune response to SARS-CoV-2, indicating recent or prior infection. This test may be positive in vaccinated patients. It is unknown for how long antibodies persist following infection and if the presence of antibodies confers protective immunity. This assay should not be used to diagnose acute SARS-CoV-2 infection.


This test may be helpful if you: 

  • Have had a positive test for COVID-19 and it has been at least 7 days and you want to know if you have detectable levels of IgG antibodies
  • Have not experienced a fever or felt feverish in the last 3 days
  • Have not experienced new or worsening symptoms of COVID-19 in the past 10 days: loss of smell or taste, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, feeling weak or lethargic, lightheadedness or dizziness, vomiting or diarrhea, slurred speech, and/or seizures

This test may NOT be helpful if you are: 

  • Feeling sick or have had a fever within the last 3 full days, please contact a healthcare provider
  • Trying to diagnose COVID-19, please contact a healthcare provider
  • Less than 7 days since being tested for and diagnosed with COVID-19
  • Directly exposed to COVID-19 in the past 14 days
  • A person with a compromised immune system, a condition that makes it difficult to fight infections
  • For the latest information on COVID-19, please visit our website for information for patients.

What will my results tell me? - Your test results may help identify if you were exposed to the virus and, if so, whether or not your body has these antibodies. Although having antibodies usually gives immunity from further infection, there is not enough evidence at this time to suggest that people who have IgG antibodies are protected against future SARS-CoV-2 infections. ?Results from this test also will not provide any information on whether you can spread the virus to others. 

If you have questions about returning to work, contact your employer for guidance. Be sure to continue to follow federal, state, and local government guidance regarding social distancing and isolation. 

Are there any limitations to IgG antibody tests? - It usually takes around 10 to 18 days after being infected with SARS-CoV-2 for your body to produce enough antibodies for detection in the blood. Getting an IgG antibody test too soon after being infected may cause a negative result that is false (false negative). Additionally, IgG antibody tests may detect IgG antibodies from previous exposure to coronaviruses other than SARS-CoV-2. This can cause a positive result that is false (false positive). There is not enough evidence at this time to suggest that people who have IgG antibodies are protected against future SARS-CoV-2 infections. 

Are there any risks involved in getting this test? - There is no risk involved in getting this test. The test is conducted by collecting a blood sample. 

How do I prepare for the test? - To have your specimen collected at the patient service center, you will need to wear a face mask, consent to a non-contact thermometer checks at the time of visit, and depending upon the patient service center schedule an appointment. There is no other special preparation other than the requirements to receive this test that is restricted to only to patients who: are asymptomatic; have been asymptomatic for at least 10 days; lack a fever (as assessed by non-contact thermometer checks at time of visit); and are wearing a face mask.

What is coronavirus disease (COVID-19)? 
Coronavirus disease (also called COVID-19) is a serious respiratory illness. It is caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus), one of the most recently discovered types of coronaviruses. It was first identified in Wuhan, China, at the end of 2019 and has spread globally, becoming a worldwide pandemic. Those who have this disease may or may not experience symptoms, which range from mild to severe. 

What is a serology test? 
This serology? ?test checks for a type of antibody called ?immunoglobulin G (IgG)?. If you’ve been exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, your body produces IgG antibodies as part of the immune response to the virus. This test cannot tell you if you have an active infection with SARS-CoV-2. If you suspect you have COVID-19, follow up with your healthcare provider about getting a molecular (PCR) test. 

Note: This test can sometimes detect antibodies from other coronaviruses, which can cause a false positive result if you have been previously diagnosed with or exposed to other types of coronaviruses. Additionally, if you test too soon, your body may not have produced enough IgG antibodies to be detected by the test yet, which can lead to a false negative result. 

At this time, antibody testing is mainly used in studies to determine how much of the population has been exposed to COVID-19. There is not enough evidence at this time to suggest that people who have IgG antibodies are protected against future COVID-19 infection. Positive or negative antibody tests do not rule out the possibility of COVID-19 infection. Results also do not provide any information on whether you can spread the virus to others.


MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


Hepatitis A Titer Test Panel

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody

The Hepatitis A Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis A Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis A.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

Hepatitis B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection.

Hepatitis A & B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis A & B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A and B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for both Hepatitis A and B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A and B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A or B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

 



Clinical Significance

Used to evaluate diphtheria immunization response. Antibody levels of > or = to 0.10 IU/mL are considered protective. For Pre and Post vaccination testing to assess normal immune response, please refer to Test Code 10680, Diphtheria Antitoxoid, Pre and Post Vaccination.

 

Alternative Name(s)

DPT Titer,Anti Diphtheria


Most Popular

Tetanus Antitoxoid (Titer)

Clinical Significance

Tetanus is caused by Clostridium tetani. Immunization with Tetanus Antitoxoid is effective with boosters in immunocompetent individuals. Antibody levels > or = to 0.10 IU/mL are considered protective. However, tetanus can still occur in some individuals with such antibody levels. These results should not be used to determine the necessity to administer antitoxin when clinically indicated. For Pre and Post vaccination testing to assess normal immune response, please refer to Test Code 91424, Tetanus Antitoxoid, Pre and Post Vaccination.

 

 


Varicella-Zoster Virus (VZV) causes chicken pox and when reactivated, potentially decades later, causes shingles. Twenty percent of adults will develop shingles, a rash or blister of the skin that may cause severe pain. Varicella-Zoster IgG, EIA reliably measures immunity due to previous infection, but is unsuitable for detection of post-vaccination immune status.

The Varicella Zoster Virus Antibodies, IgG test is typically done to check for immunity to the virus which causes chickenpox.  Varicella Zoster Virus is a member of the Herpes Virus family.  This test measures the level of antibodies produced by the immune system in response to the virus.  Results provide a numerical value for the antibody level which can be compared to a reference interval to determine immune status.  IgG antibodies are typically detectable a few weeks after the initial infection.  In the United States, many people are vaccinated against Varicella when they are young.  In most cases those who contract the virus and recover develop a natural immunity which protects them from catching it again. 

The most common condition which results from infection with Varicella is Chickenpox.  The infection causes an outbreak of an itchy rash and the development of small fluid-filled blisters.  During the primary infection, chickenpox is highly contagious and spread through coughing, sneezing or touching fluid from the blisters.  Most people recover without treatment and the virus remains latent in their system.  There is a possibility for the virus to reactivate later in life, especially in those with weakened immune systems.  This can cause shingles, a condition characterized by a painful burning or itching sensation on one or more areas of the body.  Shingles typically clear up after a few weeks as the virus becomes latent again.

The Varicella IgG Antibody Titer is usually ordered when someone is required to show proof of immune status for work or school.  It may also be done for organ transplant patients or pregnant women.

The Varicella Titer is also available as part of our Immunity Panel which includes other common titer tests.


Varicella-Zoster Virus Antibody (Immunity Screen), ACIF

Clinical Significance

A positive titer (≥1:4) by anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) indicates a history of past infection by Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV). This antibody is usually detectable within 2 days after the onset of rash and is, thereafter, detectable for life. Conversely, the absence of detectable antibody can be used as evidence of susceptibility to varicella (chickenpox).


Most Popular

Tuberculosis (TB) Test - The QuantiFERON-TB Blood Test is used to aid in the diagnosis of both latent and active infections with the bacteria that causes Tuberculosis (TB). This test has been updated to offer the Quantiferon Gold Plus which has the same high level of specificity as the previous generation of testing along with an increased sensitivity of 94%.  This test is one of only 2 blood tests for TB approved by the FDA.  Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease that typically affects the lungs.  TB Bacteria is spread through the air from one person to another. While TB is not as common in the United States as it once was, there is the still a risk posed by TB infection.  It is estimated that 11 million people in the US have a latent Tuberculosis infection (LTBI).

 

Tuberculosis is a communicable disease caused by infection with M. tuberculosis complex. Infection results in either acute disease or Latent TB Infection (LTBI), a non-communicable asymptomatic condition. The main purpose of diagnosing the latent stage is to consider medical treatment for preventing overt disease. Until recently, the tuberculin skin test was the only available method for diagnosing LTBI.

QuantiFERON®-TB gold eliminates false positive skin test due to BCG vaccination and most Non-Tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) and is an objective, reproducible qualitative test. There are no side effects or adverse reactions due to patient hypersensitivity, and no "booster effect", whereby the first test induces a false positive response on re-testing. There is no need for follow-up patient visits to obtain test results.

The TB blood test has several advantages over a skin test.  Blood testing requires only one visit to the lab while skin testing requires multiple visits to a doctor's office.  Blood testing for Tuberculosis is typically more accurate than a skin test.  Skin testing has a higher likelihood of false positive results, especially if a person has been previously vaccinated for TB. 

 


Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Immunity Profile

MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


Most Popular

Measles Immunity Test - to establish whether you have immunity to measles due to a previous infection or to vaccination.

Measles, also known as rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. 

Alternate Test Name: Measles Antibody IgG