Sex & Energy Lab Panel (Male)

The Sex & Energy Lab Panel (Male) panel contains 11 tests with 49 biomarkers.

  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Cortisol, A.M.
  • Estradiol
  • Ferritin
  • FSH and LH
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Testosterone, Free, Bioavailable and Total, MS
  • Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies
  • TSH
  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: CBC, CBC includes Differential and Platelets, CBC/PLT w/DIFF, Complete Blood Count (includes Differential and Platelets)

Absolute Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Absolute Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Absolute Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Absolute Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Absolute Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

Absolute Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Neutrophils

Neutrophils (neu) normally make up the largest number of circulating WBCs. They move into an area of damaged or infected tissue, where they engulf and destroy bacteria or sometimes fungi. Young neutrophils, recently released into circulation, are called bands.

Absolute Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Absolute Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Hematocrit

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

Hemoglobin

Serum hemoglobin is a blood test that measures the level of free hemoglobin in the liquid part of the blood (the serum). Free hemoglobin is the hemoglobin outside of the red blood cells. Most of the hemoglobin is found inside the red blood cells, not in the serum.

Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

MCH

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is a calculation of the average amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin inside a red blood cell.

MCHC

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average percentage of hemoglobin inside a red cell.

MCV

Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is a measurement of the average size of RBCs.

Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

MPV

Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) - When it indicates average size of platelets are small; older platelets are generally smaller than younger ones and a low MPV may mean that a condition is affecting the production of platelets by the bone marrow. When it indicates a high number of larger, younger platelets in the blood; this may be due to the bone marrow producing and releasing platelets rapidly into circulation.

Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Neutrophils

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed.

Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Platelet Count

A platelet count is a test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. Platelets help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells.

Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

RDW

Red cell distribution width (RDW), which may be included in a CBC, is a calculation of the variation in the size of RBCs.

Reactive Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Red Blood Cell Count

An RBC count is a blood test that tells how many red blood cells (RBCs) you have. RBCs contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. How much oxygen your body tissues get depends on how many RBCs you have and how well they work.

White Blood Cell Count

A WBC count is a test to measure the number of white blood cells (WBCs) in the blood. WBCs help fight infections. They are also called leukocytes. There are five major types of white blood cells: basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes (T cells and B cells), monocytes and neutrophils

Also known as: Cortisol AM

Cortisol, A.M.

A cortisol level is a blood test that measures the amount of cortisol, a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland. The test is done to check for increased or decreased cortisol production. Cortisol is a steroid hormone released from the adrenal gland in response to ACTH, a hormone from the pituitary gland in the brain. Cortisol affects many different body systems. It plays a role in: bone, circulatory system, immune system. metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein. ervous system and stress responses.

Estradiol

Estradiol (estradiol-17 beta, E2) is part of an estrogen that is a group of steroids that regulate the menstrual cycle and function as the main female sex hormones. Estrogens are responsible for the development of female sex organs and secondary sex characteristics and are tied to the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. They are considered the main sex hormones in women and are present in small quantities in men. Estradiol (E2) is the predominant form of estrogen and is produced primarily in the ovaries with additional amounts produced by the adrenal glands in women and in the testes and adrenal glands in men. Estradiol levels are used in evaluating ovarian function. Estradiol levels are increased in cases of early (precocious) puberty in girls and gynecomastia in men. Its main use has been in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhea – for example, to determine whether the cause is menopause, pregnancy, or a medical problem. In assisted reproductive technology (ART), serial measurements are used to monitor follicle development in the ovary in the days prior to in vitro fertilization. Estradiol is also sometimes used to monitor menopausal hormone replacement therapy.

Ferritin

Ferritin is a protein found inside cells that stores iron so your body can use it later. A ferritin test indirectly measures the amount of iron in your blood. The amount of ferritin in your blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron stored in your body.

Also known as: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) and Luteinizing Hormone (LH), Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone

Fsh

Lh

Also known as: Free T3, FT3, T3 Free

T3, Free

This test measures the amount of triiodothyronine, or T3, in the blood.

Also known as: Free T4, FT4, T4 Free

T4, Free

The free T4 test is not affected by protein levels. Since free T4 is the active form of thyroxine, the free T4 test is may be a more accurate reflection of thyroid hormone function.

Also known as: Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total LCMSMS

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Sex Hormone Binding

The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test measures the concentration of SHBG in the blood. SHBG is a protein that is produced by the liver and binds tightly to testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and estradiol (an estrogen). In this bound state, it transports them in the blood as an inactive form. The amount of SHBG in circulation is affected by age and sex, by decreased or increased testosterone or estrogen production and can be affected by certain diseases and conditions such as liver disease, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, and obesity. Changes in SHBG levels can affect the amount of testosterone that is available to be used by the body's tissues. A total testosterone test does not distinguish between bound and unbound testosterone but determines the overall quantity of testosterone. If a person's SHBG level is not normal, then the total testosterone may not be an accurate representation of the amount of testosterone that is available to the person's tissues.

TESTOSTERONE, FREE

TESTOSTERONE, TOTAL,

A testosterone test measures the amount of the male hormone, testosterone, in the blood. Both men and women produce this hormone. In males, the testicles produce most of the testosterone in the body. Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of low testosterone: In boys -- early or late puberty and in men -- impotence, low level of sexual interest, infertility, thinning of the bones In females, the ovaries produce most of the testosterone and levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of higher testosterone levels, such as: decreased breast size, excess hair growth, increased size of the clitoris. irregular or absent menstrual periods and male-pattern baldness or hair thinning.

TESTOSTERONE,BIOAVAILABLE

Also known as: Anti-Thyroid Microsomal Antibody, Anti-TPO, Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies TPO, TPO

Thyroid Peroxidase

Also known as: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyrotropin

TSH

A TSH test is a lab test that measures the amount of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland. It tells the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the blood.

TSH

Also known as: B12, B12 Vitamin, Cobalamin, Cyanocobalamin, Vitamin B12 Cobalamin

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is part of the B complex of vitamins and measurea the levels of vitamin B12 in the liquid portion of the blood, the serum or plasma, to detect deficiencies. Cobalamine, or vitamin B12, is found in animal products such as red meat, fish, poultry, milk, yogurt, and eggs and is not produced in the human body. In recent years, fortified cereals, breads, and other grain products have also become important dietary sources of B12. Vitamin B12 is necessary for normal RBC formation, tissue and cellular repair, and DNA synthesis. B12 is important for nerve health. A deficiency in B12 can lead to macrocytic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia, a type of macrocytic anemia, is characterized by the production of fewer but larger RBCs called macrocytes, in addition to some cellular changes in the bone marrow. B12 deficiency can lead to varying degrees of neuropathy, nerve damage that can cause tingling and numbness in the affected person's hands and feet.
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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