Hepatic Function Panel with GTT

The Hepatic Function Panel with GTT panel contains 2 tests with 11 biomarkers.

The Hepatic Function Panel with Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is a comprehensive set of blood tests designed to evaluate the health and functioning of the liver. This panel measures various enzymes, proteins, and substances produced or processed by the liver, providing crucial insights into its condition. The inclusion of GGT enhances the panel’s ability to detect and monitor liver disease and bile duct obstructions.

Collection Method: Blood Draw

Specimen Type: Serum

Test Preparation: No preparation required

When and Why the Hepatic Function Panel with GGT May Be Ordered

This panel is often ordered:

  1. To Investigate Liver Symptoms: Such as jaundice, abdominal pain, nausea, fatigue, or unusual itching.

  2. Monitoring Liver Diseases: For patients with known liver conditions like hepatitis, cirrhosis, or fatty liver disease.

  3. Assessment Before and After Treatment: To evaluate liver function before starting medications known to affect the liver and to monitor the liver's response to various treatments.

  4. Screening for Alcohol-Related Liver Damage: Given that GGT is sensitive to alcohol consumption, it's useful in detecting alcohol-induced liver injury.

  5. Routine Health Check-ups: Especially for individuals with risk factors for liver disease, such as family history, alcohol use, or obesity.

What the Hepatic Function Panel with GGT Checks For

  • Albumin and Globulin: Key proteins produced by the liver. Albumin levels can indicate the liver's synthetic ability, while the albumin/globulin ratio helps in diagnosing different liver conditions.

  • Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP): An enzyme related to bile duct function. Elevated levels may suggest bile duct obstruction.

  • Alanine Transaminase (ALT) and Aspartate Aminotransferase (AST): Enzymes that, when elevated, indicate liver cell damage.

  • Bilirubin (Direct, Indirect, and Total): A byproduct of red blood cell breakdown processed by the liver. Abnormal levels can indicate liver dysfunction or bile duct blockages.

  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT): An enzyme that, when elevated, can suggest liver damage, bile duct problems, or alcohol abuse.

  • Protein, Total: Measures the total amount of albumin and globulin in the blood.

Conditions or Diseases the Hepatic Function Panel with GGT Can Check For

  • Hepatitis: Inflammation of the liver, often due to viral infections, toxins, or alcohol.

  • Cirrhosis: Scarring of the liver tissue from long-term damage.

  • Bile Duct Obstruction: Such as gallstones or tumors blocking the bile ducts.

  • Fatty Liver Disease: Accumulation of fat in the liver cells.

  • Alcohol-Related Liver Disease: Caused by excessive alcohol consumption.

  • Liver Tumors: Both benign and malignant liver tumors can alter liver function tests.

The Hepatic Function Panel with GGT is an essential tool for diagnosing, monitoring, and managing various liver conditions. Its comprehensive approach allows for a detailed assessment of liver health, guiding appropriate medical interventions and lifestyle modifications for maintaining liver health.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Gamma Glutamyl Transferase GGT, Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase, Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase, Gamma-GT, GGTP, GTP

Ggt

Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a test to measure the amount of the enzyme GGT in the blood.

Also known as: LFTs, Liver Function Tests, Liver Panel

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Albumin/Globulin Ratio

The ratio of albumin to globulin (A/G ratio) is calculated from measured albumin and calculated globulin (total protein - albumin). Normally, there is a little more albumin than globulins, giving a normal A/G ratio of slightly over 1. Because disease states affect the relative amounts of albumin and globulin, the A/G ratio may provide a clue as to the cause of the change in protein levels. A low A/G ratio may reflect overproduction of globulins, such as seen in multiple myeloma or autoimmune diseases, or underproduction of albumin, such as may occur with cirrhosis, or selective loss of albumin from the circulation, as may occur with kidney disease (nephrotic syndrome). A high A/G ratio suggests underproduction of immunoglobulins as may be seen in some genetic deficiencies and in some leukemias. More specific tests, such as liver enzyme tests and serum protein electrophoresis, must be performed to make an accurate diagnosis. With a low total protein that is due to plasma expansion (dilution of the blood), the A/G ratio will typically be normal because both albumin and globulin will be diluted to the same extent.

Alkaline Phosphatase

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a protein found in all body tissues. Tissues with higher amounts of ALP include the liver, bile ducts, and bone.

Alt

Alanine transaminase (ALT) is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver. Injury to the liver results in release of the substance into the blood.

AST

AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme found in high amounts in liver, heart, and muscle cells. It is also found in lesser amounts in other tissues.

Bilirubin, Direct

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bilirubin, Indirect

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bilirubin, Total

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Globulin

Globulins is the collective term for most blood proteins other than albumin. Identifying the types of globulins can help diagnose certain disorders. Globulins are roughly divided into three groups: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Gamma globulines include various types of antibodies such as immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A.

Protein, Total

The total protein is the total amount of two classes of proteins, albumin and globulin that are found in the fluid portion of your blood. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Your albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and your globulins are an important part of your immune system.
*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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