Blood Code - 9. Nutrient Panel Addendum

The Blood Code - 9. Nutrient Panel Addendum panel contains 6 tests with 6 biomarkers.

Blood Code - 9. Nutrient Panel Addendum: This panel is developed to be WITH The Blood Code Metabolic Discovery Panel (which contains the Vitamin D and Ferritin) to assess vitamin, mineral and protein status.

  • Homocysteine
  • Magnesium, RBC
  • Prealbumin
  • Vitamin A (Retinol)
  • Vitamin K
  • Zinc

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Homocysteine, Homocysteine Cardiovascular

HOMOCYSTEINE,

Vitamin K

Vitamin K helps your body by making proteins for healthy bones and tissues. It also makes proteins for blood clotting. If you don't have enough vitamin K, you may bleed too much.

Also known as: Thyroxine Binding Prealbumin, Thyroxine-binding Prealbumin, Transthyretin

Prealbumin

Prealbumin, also called transthyretin, is one of the major proteins in the blood and is produced primarily by the liver. Its functions are to carry thyroxine (the main thyroid hormone) and vitamin A throughout the body. This test measures the level of prealbumin in the blood.

Also known as: Magnesium RBC

Magnesium, Rbc

About half of the body's magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found inside cells of body tissues and organs. Magnesium is needed for nearly all chemical processes in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, and keeps the bones strong. Magnesium is also needed for the heart to function normally and to help regulate blood pressure. Magnesium also helps the body control blood sugar level and helps support the body's defense (immune) system.

Also known as: Retinol, Vitamin A, Vitamin A Retinol

Vitamin A

This test measures the level of retinol in the blood; retinol is the primary form of vitamin A in animals. Vitamin A is an essential nutrient required for healthy vision, skin growth and integrity, bone formation, immune function, and embryonic development. It is required to produce photoreceptors in the eyes and to maintain the lining of the surface of the eyes and other mucous membranes. Deficiencies in vitamin A can impair night vision, cause eye damage, and in severe cases lead to blindness. Acute or chronic excesses of vitamin A can be toxic, cause a range of symptoms, and sometimes lead to birth defects. The body cannot make vitamin A and must rely on dietary sources of vitamin A. Meat sources provide vitamin A (as retinol), while vegetable and fruit sources provide carotene (a substance that can be converted into vitamin A by the liver). Vitamin A is stored in the liver and fat tissues (it is fat-soluble), and healthy adults may have as much as a year's worth stored. The body maintains a relatively stable concentration in the blood through a feedback system that releases vitamin A from storage as needed and increases or decreases the efficiency of dietary vitamin A absorption.

Also known as: ZN, Plasma

Zinc