Diabetes, Newly Diagnosed and Monitoring Panel Test in Crown Point, Indiana

The Diabetes, Newly Diagnosed and Monitoring Panel panel contains 4 tests with 31 biomarkers.

This panel is designed for individuals who have been newly diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus. This panel is also appropriate for individuals with diabetes receiving an annual visit. The panel affords the opportunity to assess fasting lipid levels, fasting glucose, HbA1C, liver function tests (albumin, total and direct bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase, total protein, ALT, AST), UAE, spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio, serum creatinine/ eGFR. The grouping of these tests, readily identifiable as elements that adhere to guideline recommendations, is intended to facilitate the ready adherence to professional society clinical practice guidelines. Components of the test related to comprehensive diabetes evaluation, as outlined in the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2013. These are in broad agreement with the guidelines written by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.
  • No Prescription Needed
  • Discounts up to 80%
  • Hundreds of Lab Tests Available

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Chem 12, Chemistry Panel, Chemistry Screen, CMP, Complete Metabolic Panel, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel CMP, SMA 12, SMA 20

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Albumin/Globulin Ratio

The ratio of albumin to globulin (A/G ratio) is calculated from measured albumin and calculated globulin (total protein - albumin). Normally, there is a little more albumin than globulins, giving a normal A/G ratio of slightly over 1. Because disease states affect the relative amounts of albumin and globulin, the A/G ratio may provide a clue as to the cause of the change in protein levels. A low A/G ratio may reflect overproduction of globulins, such as seen in multiple myeloma or autoimmune diseases, or underproduction of albumin, such as may occur with cirrhosis, or selective loss of albumin from the circulation, as may occur with kidney disease (nephrotic syndrome). A high A/G ratio suggests underproduction of immunoglobulins as may be seen in some genetic deficiencies and in some leukemias. More specific tests, such as liver enzyme tests and serum protein electrophoresis, must be performed to make an accurate diagnosis. With a low total protein that is due to plasma expansion (dilution of the blood), the A/G ratio will typically be normal because both albumin and globulin will be diluted to the same extent.

Alkaline Phosphatase

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a protein found in all body tissues. Tissues with higher amounts of ALP include the liver, bile ducts, and bone.

Alt

Alanine transaminase (ALT) is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver. Injury to the liver results in release of the substance into the blood.

AST

AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme found in high amounts in liver, heart, and muscle cells. It is also found in lesser amounts in other tissues.

Bilirubin, Total

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bun/Creatinine Ratio

A ratio between a person’s BUN and blood creatinine to help determine what is causing these concentrations to be higher than normal. The ratio of BUN to creatinine is usually between 10:1 and 20:1. An increased ratio may be due to a condition that causes a decrease in the flow of blood to the kidneys, such as congestive heart failure or dehydration. It may also be seen with increased protein, from gastrointestinal bleeding, or increased protein in the diet. The ratio may be decreased with liver disease (due to decrease in the formation of urea) and malnutrition.

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system.

Carbon Dioxide

CO2 is carbon dioxide. Measures the amount of carbon dioxide in the liquid part of your blood, called the serum. In the body, most of the CO2 is in the form of a substance called bicarbonate (HCO3-). Therefore, the CO2 blood test is really a measure of your blood bicarbonate level.

Chloride

Chloride is a type of electrolyte. It works with other electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These substances help keep the proper balance of body fluids and maintain the body's acid-base balance. This is a measure of the amount of chloride in the fluid portion (serum) of the blood.

Creatinine

The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Egfr African American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Egfr Non-Afr. American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

GFR-NON AFRICAN AMERICAN

Globulin

Globulins is the collective term for most blood proteins other than albumin. Identifying the types of globulins can help diagnose certain disorders. Globulins are roughly divided into three groups: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Gamma globulines include various types of antibodies such as immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A.

Glucose

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including those in the brain. The hormones insulin and glucagon help control blood glucose levels.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral that the body needs to work normally. It helps nerves and muscles communicate. It also helps move nutrients into cells and waste products out of cells. A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium's harmful effects on blood pressure.

Protein, Total

The total protein is the total amount of two classes of proteins, albumin and globulin that are found in the fluid portion of your blood. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Your albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and your globulins are an important part of your immune system.

Sodium

Sodium is a substance that the body needs to work properly it is vital to normal body processes, including nerve and muscle function

Urea Nitrogen (Bun)

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down. BUN measures the amount of urea nitrogen in the blood.

Also known as: A1c, Glycated Hemoglobin, Glycohemoglobin, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, HA1c, HbA1c, Hemoglobin A1c, Hemoglobin A1c HgbA1C, Hgb A1c

Hemoglobin A1c

The A1c test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the last 2 to 3 months. It does this by measuring the concentration of glycated (also often called glycosylated) hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin is an oxygen-transporting protein found inside red blood cells (RBCs). There are several types of normal hemoglobin, but the predominant form – about 95-98% – is hemoglobin A. As glucose circulates in the blood, some of it spontaneously binds to hemoglobin A. The hemoglobin molecules with attached glucose are called glycated hemoglobin. The higher the concentration of glucose in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin is formed. Once the glucose binds to the hemoglobin, it remains there for the life of the red blood cell – normally about 120 days. The predominant form of glycated hemoglobin is referred to as HbA1c or A1c. A1c is produced on a daily basis and slowly cleared from the blood as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test is used to monitor treatment in someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes. It helps to evaluate how well their glucose levels have been controlled by treatment over time. This test may be used to screen for and diagnose diabetes or risk of developing diabetes. In 2010, clinical practice guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) stated that A1c may be added to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an option for diabetes screening and diagnosis. For monitoring purposes, an A1c of less than 7% indicates good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics. However, in 2012, the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) issued a position statement recommending that the management of glucose control in type 2 diabetes be more "patient-centered." Data from recent studies have shown that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause complications and that people with risk of severe hypoglycemia, underlying health conditions, complications, and a limited life expectancy do not necessarily benefit from having a stringent goal of less than 7% for their A1c. The statement recommends that people work closely with their doctor to select a goal that reflects each person's individual health status and that balances risks and benefits.

Also known as: Lipid Panel with Ratios (fasting), Lipid Profile with Ratios (fasting), Lipids

Chol/HDLC Ratio

Cholesterol, Total

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood and stick to the walls of your arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can narrow your arteries or even block them. High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase your risk of heart disease. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. You are likely to have high cholesterol if members of your family have it, if you are overweight or if you eat a lot of fatty foods. You can lower your cholesterol by exercising more and eating more fruits and vegetables. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol.

HDL Cholesterol

LDL-Cholesterol

LDL/HDL Ratio

Non HDL Cholesterol

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. This test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Most triglycerides are found in fat (adipose) tissue, but some triglycerides circulate in the blood to provide fuel for muscles to work. After a person eats, an increased level of triglycerides is found in the blood as the body converts the energy not needed right away into fat. Triglycerides move via the blood from the gut to adipose tissue for storage. In between meals, triglycerides are released from fat tissue to be used as an energy source for the body. Most triglycerides are carried in the blood by lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the reason for this is not well understood. Certain factors can contribute to high triglyceride levels and to risk of CVD, including lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking cigarettes, consuming excess alcohol, and medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease.

Also known as: Microalbumin Random Urine with Creatinine

Creatinine, Random Urine

Microalbumin

Microalbumin/Creatinine

Search by Zip Code

Page 1 of 1

Total Rows 41

View
Location
Distance

Patient Service Center
119 E 93rd Ave
Crown Point, Indiana 46307 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 219-794-1170
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
17665 Torrence Ave
Lansing, Illinois 60438 Map Map
Distance 16.80 miles
Phone 708-315-8951
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
813 Porter Campus Dr
Valparaiso, Indiana 46383 Map Map
Distance 17.30 miles
Phone 219-250-0914
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1100 5Th Ave
Hammond, Indiana 46320 Map Map
Distance 19.60 miles
Phone 219-228-7133
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:30 pm & 1:00 pm-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4143 Sauk Trail
Richton Park, Illinois 60471 Map Map
Distance 21.50 miles
Phone 844-836-2867
Hours

Mon - Fri: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sat: By Appointment only.

Appointments are required.. Please call 844-836-2867 to schedule an appointment.


Patient Service Center
4005 167Th St
Country Club Hills, Illinois 60478 Map Map
Distance 23.60 miles
Phone 708-957-6868
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
9046 W 159Th St
Orland Park, Illinois 60462 Map Map
Distance 30.50 miles
Phone 312-273-0530
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
19070 Everett Blvd Unit 111
Mokena, Illinois 60448 Map Map
Distance 30.70 miles
Phone 708-479-1193
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
175 E Bethel Dr
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914 Map Map
Distance 31.00 miles
Phone 815-592-3312
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-1:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-10:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
10837 S Cicero Ave Ste 310
Oak Lawn, Illinois 60453 Map Map
Distance 31.10 miles
Phone 312-561-0965
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
7050 S Cicero Ave
Bedford Park, Illinois 60638 Map Map
Distance 35.50 miles
Phone 708-929-0181
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
111 N Wabash Ave Ste 1514
Chicago, Illinois 60602 Map Map
Distance 37.00 miles
Phone 312-332-5960
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1460 N Halsted St Ste 201
Chicago, Illinois 60642 Map Map
Distance 39.00 miles
Phone 224-301-4687
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1431 N Western Ave Ste 509
Chicago, Illinois 60622 Map Map
Distance 39.40 miles
Phone 773-227-4349
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3000 N Halsted Ste 604
Chicago, Illinois 60657 Map Map
Distance 41.30 miles
Phone 773-477-4783
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
310 N Hammes Ave Ste 102
Joliet, Illinois 60435 Map Map
Distance 42.70 miles
Phone 779-702-0246
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1113 Fairview Ave
Westmont, Illinois 60559 Map Map
Distance 43.10 miles
Phone 630-353-0597
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:30 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-2:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4126 N Milwaukee Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60641 Map Map
Distance 43.70 miles
Phone 773-736-3814
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
7530 Woodward Ave Ste G
Woodridge, Illinois 60517 Map Map
Distance 43.90 miles
Phone 630-910-1142
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:30 am & 12:30 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:30 am & 12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
484 W Boughton Rd Ste 100
Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 Map Map
Distance 44.10 miles
Phone 630-759-3773
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:30 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
6374 N Lincoln Ave Ste 201
Chicago, Illinois 60659 Map Map
Distance 45.20 miles
Phone 773-539-5573
Hours
  • M-F 9:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 9:00 am-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4801 W Peterson Ave Ste 205
Chicago, Illinois 60646 Map Map
Distance 47.20 miles
Phone 312-261-0747
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 9:30 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
17w300 22nd St.
Oak Brook Terr, Illinois 60181 Map Map
Distance 47.20 miles
Phone 312-816-9374
Hours

Premium Draw Fee: $30

Appointments are required. Please call 312-816-9374 to schedule an appointment.

Service area

20-mile radius


Patient Service Center
800 Austin St East Tower Ste 457
Evanston, Illinois 60202 Map Map
Distance 47.60 miles
Phone 847-450-4779
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-11:30 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
13550 Route 30, Suite 100
Plainfield, Illinois 60544 Map Map
Distance 48.70 miles
Phone 331-300-9816
Hours

Mon – Fri:

Premium Draw Fee: $25 for Yorkville, Aurora, Montgomery, and Plainfield

Appointments are required. Please call 331-300-9816 or use the link to schedule an appointment.

Service area:

Yorkville, Aurora, Montgomery, and Plainfield


Patient Service Center
2340 S Highland Ave Ste 330
Lombard, Illinois 60148 Map Map
Distance 48.90 miles
Phone 630-932-2175
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
340 E North Ave
Lombard, Illinois 60148 Map Map
Distance 48.90 miles
Phone 630-932-6647
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
640 S Washington St Ste 140
Naperville, Illinois 60540 Map Map
Distance 49.10 miles
Phone 630-778-9606
Hours
  • M-F 5:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 5:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
12690 S Route 59 Ste 1
Plainfield, Illinois 60585 Map Map
Distance 49.20 miles
Phone 815-556-2011
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1600 Dempster St Ste 218
Park Ridge, Illinois 60068 Map Map
Distance 50.40 miles
Phone 847-795-0205
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2088 Ogden Ave Ste 240
Aurora, Illinois 60504 Map Map
Distance 53.40 miles
Phone 630-692-1539
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2551 Compass Rd Ste 120
Glenview, Illinois 60026 Map Map
Distance 54.90 miles
Phone 847-998-8909
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:30 am-2:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
303 E Army Trail Rd Ste 111
Bloomingdale, Illinois 60108 Map Map
Distance 55.10 miles
Phone 630-351-0516
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
314 W Army Trail Rd
Bloomingdale, Illinois 60108 Map Map
Distance 55.10 miles
Phone 630-439-7660
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1100 W Central Rd Ste 402
Arlington Heights, Illinois 60005 Map Map
Distance 56.90 miles
Phone 847-342-0355
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
808 E Woodfield Rd Ste 400
Schaumburg, Illinois 60173 Map Map
Distance 58.50 miles
Phone 224-301-7530
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
Mobile Phlebotomy Service
Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008 Map Map
Distance 59.30 miles
Phone 630-923-4982
Hours

Mon – Thu: 7:00 am – 7:00 pm 
Sat: 8:00 am – 12:00 pm 

Premium Draw Fee: $35.00 

Appointments are required. Please call 630-923-4982 to schedule an appointment. 

Service area: 30–mile radius from zip code 60008


Patient Service Center
507 W Kendall Dr Ste 12
Yorkville, Illinois 60560 Map Map
Distance 59.40 miles
Phone 331-442-7238
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 6:30 am-11:30 am

Patient Service Center
1180 W Wilson St Ste D
Batavia, Illinois 60510 Map Map
Distance 60.60 miles
Phone 630-406-6525
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2500 W Higgins Rd Ste 460
Hoffman Estates, Illinois 60169 Map Map
Distance 60.80 miles
Phone 847-781-0741
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2500 Niles Rd Ste 10B
Saint Joseph, Michigan 49085 Map Map
Distance 64.30 miles
Phone 269-428-2622
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-2:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-1:00 pm