Blood Chemistry Analysis Comprehensive Panel Test in Marion, Illinois

The Blood Chemistry Analysis Comprehensive Panel panel contains 45 tests with 139 biomarkers.

Dr. Weatherby’s Comprehensive Panel - "Blood Chemistry Analysis Comprehensive Panel" contains the following 45 tests - Bilirubin, Direct; Bilirubin, Fractionated; C-Peptide; C-Reactive Protein (CRP); CBC (includes Differential and Platelets); Collagen Cross-Linked N-Telopeptide (NTx), 24-Hour Urine; Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); Cortisol, A.M.; Cortisol, P.M.; Creatine Kinase (CK), Total; Creatinine; Creatinine Clearance; DHEA Sulfate, Immunoassay; Estradiol; Ferritin; Fibrinogen Activity, Clauss; Folate, Serum; Fructosamine; Gamma Glutamyl Transferase (GGT); Gastrin; Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C); Homocysteine; hs-CRP; Insulin; Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC); Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD); Lipid Panel With Ratios; Magnesium; Phosphate (as Phosphorus); Progesterone, Immunoassay; Protein, Total and Protein Electrophoresis, with Scan; PSA Total; QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS; Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG); T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS; T3 Total; T3, Free; T4, Free; Testosterone, Free, Bioavailable and Total, LC/MS/MS; Thyroid Panel; Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies; TSH; Uric Acid; Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin); and VLDL Cholesterol.

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The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: Bilirubin Direct, Conjugated Bilirubin

Bilirubin, Direct

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Also known as: Bilirubin Fractionated

Bilirubin, Indirect

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bilirubin, Total

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Also known as: C-Terminal Insulin, Connecting peptide insulin, CPeptide, Insulin C-peptide, Proinsulin C-peptide

C-Peptide

Also known as: C-Reactive Protein, CReactive Protein CRP, CRP

C-REACTIVE PROTEIN

C-reactive protein is produced by the liver. The level of CRP rises when there is inflammation throughout the body.

Also known as: CBC, CBC includes Differential and Platelets, CBC/PLT w/DIFF, Complete Blood Count (includes Differential and Platelets)

Absolute Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Absolute Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Absolute Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Absolute Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Absolute Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

Absolute Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Absolute Neutrophils

Neutrophils (neu) normally make up the largest number of circulating WBCs. They move into an area of damaged or infected tissue, where they engulf and destroy bacteria or sometimes fungi. Young neutrophils, recently released into circulation, are called bands.

Absolute Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Absolute Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Band Neutrophils

Immature forms of neutrophils are called neutrophilic band cells. Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed. Large numbers of immature forms of neutrophils, called neutrophilic band cells, are produced by the bone marrow when the demand is high.

Basophils

Basophils normally constitute 1% or less of the total white blood cell count but may increase or decrease in certain diseases and are thought to be involved in allergic reactions.

Blasts

Blasts are immature forms of white blood cells.

Eosinophils

Eosinophils (eos) respond to infections caused by parasites and play a role in allergic reactions (hypersensitivities)

Hematocrit

Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of the volume of whole blood that is made up of red blood cells. This measurement depends on the number of red blood cells and the size of red blood cells.

Hemoglobin

Serum hemoglobin is a blood test that measures the level of free hemoglobin in the liquid part of the blood (the serum). Free hemoglobin is the hemoglobin outside of the red blood cells. Most of the hemoglobin is found inside the red blood cells, not in the serum.

Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

MCH

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is a calculation of the average amount of oxygen-carrying hemoglobin inside a red blood cell.

MCHC

Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average percentage of hemoglobin inside a red cell.

MCV

Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is a measurement of the average size of RBCs.

Metamyelocytes

Metamyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Monocytes

Monocytes (mono), similar to neutrophils, move to an area of infection and engulf and destroy bacteria. They are associated more often with chronic rather than acute infections. They are also involved in tissue repair and other functions involving the immune system.

MPV

Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) - When it indicates average size of platelets are small; older platelets are generally smaller than younger ones and a low MPV may mean that a condition is affecting the production of platelets by the bone marrow. When it indicates a high number of larger, younger platelets in the blood; this may be due to the bone marrow producing and releasing platelets rapidly into circulation.

Myelocytes

Myelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

Neutrophils

Neutrophils are a type of white blood cell that is responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. Neutrophils are produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream to travel to wherever they are needed.

Nucleated Rbc

Nucleated Red Blood Cells (nRBC) ) the presence of NRBCs in the adult blood is usually associated with malignant neoplasms, bone marrow diseases, and other serious disorders.

Platelet Count

A platelet count is a test to measure how many platelets you have in your blood. Platelets help the blood clot. They are smaller than red or white blood cells.

Promyelocytes

Promyelocytes are immature forms of white blood cells.

RDW

Red cell distribution width (RDW), which may be included in a CBC, is a calculation of the variation in the size of RBCs.

Reactive Lymphocytes

Lymphocytes are white blood cells that exist in both the blood and the lymphatic system. They are divided into three types. The B lymphocytes (B cells) are antibody-producing cells that are essential for acquired, antigen-specific immune responses. The second type are T lymphocytes (T cells) some T cells help the body distinguish between "self" and "non-self" antigens while others initiate and control the extent of an immune response, boosting it as needed and then slowing it as the condition resolves. Other types of T cells directly attack and neutralize virus-infected or cancerous cells. The third type are natural killer cells (NK cells) that directly attack and kill abnormal cells such as cancer cells or those infected with a virus.

Red Blood Cell Count

An RBC count is a blood test that tells how many red blood cells (RBCs) you have. RBCs contain hemoglobin, which carries oxygen. How much oxygen your body tissues get depends on how many RBCs you have and how well they work.

White Blood Cell Count

A WBC count is a test to measure the number of white blood cells (WBCs) in the blood. WBCs help fight infections. They are also called leukocytes. There are five major types of white blood cells: basophils, eosinophils, lymphocytes (T cells and B cells), monocytes and neutrophils

Also known as: Collagen CrossLinked NTelopeptide NTx 24Hour Urine, N-Telopeptide, 24-Hr Urine, NTx, NTx, 24-Hr Urine

Creatinine, 24 Hour Urine

N-Telopeptide (Ntx), 24 U

Total Volume

Also known as: Chem 12, Chemistry Panel, Chemistry Screen, CMP, Complete Metabolic Panel, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel CMP, SMA 12, SMA 20

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Albumin/Globulin Ratio

The ratio of albumin to globulin (A/G ratio) is calculated from measured albumin and calculated globulin (total protein - albumin). Normally, there is a little more albumin than globulins, giving a normal A/G ratio of slightly over 1. Because disease states affect the relative amounts of albumin and globulin, the A/G ratio may provide a clue as to the cause of the change in protein levels. A low A/G ratio may reflect overproduction of globulins, such as seen in multiple myeloma or autoimmune diseases, or underproduction of albumin, such as may occur with cirrhosis, or selective loss of albumin from the circulation, as may occur with kidney disease (nephrotic syndrome). A high A/G ratio suggests underproduction of immunoglobulins as may be seen in some genetic deficiencies and in some leukemias. More specific tests, such as liver enzyme tests and serum protein electrophoresis, must be performed to make an accurate diagnosis. With a low total protein that is due to plasma expansion (dilution of the blood), the A/G ratio will typically be normal because both albumin and globulin will be diluted to the same extent.

Alkaline Phosphatase

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is a protein found in all body tissues. Tissues with higher amounts of ALP include the liver, bile ducts, and bone.

Alt

Alanine transaminase (ALT) is an enzyme found in the highest amounts in the liver. Injury to the liver results in release of the substance into the blood.

AST

AST (aspartate aminotransferase) is an enzyme found in high amounts in liver, heart, and muscle cells. It is also found in lesser amounts in other tissues.

Bilirubin, Total

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Bun/Creatinine Ratio

A ratio between a person’s BUN and blood creatinine to help determine what is causing these concentrations to be higher than normal. The ratio of BUN to creatinine is usually between 10:1 and 20:1. An increased ratio may be due to a condition that causes a decrease in the flow of blood to the kidneys, such as congestive heart failure or dehydration. It may also be seen with increased protein, from gastrointestinal bleeding, or increased protein in the diet. The ratio may be decreased with liver disease (due to decrease in the formation of urea) and malnutrition.

Calcium

You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral. Calcium has many important jobs. The body stores more than 99 percent of its calcium in the bones and teeth to help make and keep them strong. The rest is throughout the body in blood, muscle and the fluid between cells. Your body needs calcium to help muscles and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system.

Carbon Dioxide

CO2 is carbon dioxide. Measures the amount of carbon dioxide in the liquid part of your blood, called the serum. In the body, most of the CO2 is in the form of a substance called bicarbonate (HCO3-). Therefore, the CO2 blood test is really a measure of your blood bicarbonate level.

Chloride

Chloride is a type of electrolyte. It works with other electrolytes such as potassium, sodium, and carbon dioxide (CO2). These substances help keep the proper balance of body fluids and maintain the body's acid-base balance. This is a measure of the amount of chloride in the fluid portion (serum) of the blood.

Creatinine

The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Egfr African American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Egfr Non-Afr. American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

GFR-AFRICAN AMERICAN

GFR-NON AFRICAN AMERICAN

Globulin

Globulins is the collective term for most blood proteins other than albumin. Identifying the types of globulins can help diagnose certain disorders. Globulins are roughly divided into three groups: alpha, beta, and gamma globulins. Gamma globulines include various types of antibodies such as immunoglobulins (Ig) M, G, and A.

Glucose

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including those in the brain. The hormones insulin and glucagon help control blood glucose levels.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral that the body needs to work normally. It helps nerves and muscles communicate. It also helps move nutrients into cells and waste products out of cells. A diet rich in potassium helps to offset some of sodium's harmful effects on blood pressure.

Protein, Total

The total protein is the total amount of two classes of proteins, albumin and globulin that are found in the fluid portion of your blood. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Your albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and your globulins are an important part of your immune system.

Sodium

Sodium is a substance that the body needs to work properly it is vital to normal body processes, including nerve and muscle function

Urea Nitrogen (Bun)

BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. Urea nitrogen is what forms when protein breaks down. BUN measures the amount of urea nitrogen in the blood.

Also known as: Cortisol AM

Cortisol, A.M.

A cortisol level is a blood test that measures the amount of cortisol, a steroid hormone produced by the adrenal gland. The test is done to check for increased or decreased cortisol production. Cortisol is a steroid hormone released from the adrenal gland in response to ACTH, a hormone from the pituitary gland in the brain. Cortisol affects many different body systems. It plays a role in: bone, circulatory system, immune system. metabolism of fats, carbohydrates, and protein. ervous system and stress responses.

Also known as: Cortisol PM

Cortisol, P.M.

Also known as: CK (Total), CPK, CPK (Total), Creatine Kinase CK Total, Creatine Phosphokinase (CPK), Total CK

Creatine Kinase, Total

Also known as: Creat

Creatinine

The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Egfr African American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Egfr Non-Afr. American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Also known as: CCT, CRCL

Body Surface Area

Creatinine

The creatinine blood test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. This test is done to see how well your kidneys work.

Creatinine Clearance

Creatinine, 24 Hour Urine

Egfr African American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Egfr Non-Afr. American

Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working. Specifically, it estimates how much blood passes through the glomeruli each minute. Glomeruli are the tiny filters in the kidneys that filter waste from the blood.

Height Feet

Weight Pounds

Also known as: Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate, DHEA SO4, DHEA Sulfate Immunoassay, DHEAS, Transdehydroandrosterone

DHEA SULFATE

DHEA-sulfate test measures the amount of DHEA-sulfate in the blood. DHEA-sulfate is a weak male hormone (androgen) produced by the adrenal gland in both men and women.

Estradiol

Estradiol (estradiol-17 beta, E2) is part of an estrogen that is a group of steroids that regulate the menstrual cycle and function as the main female sex hormones. Estrogens are responsible for the development of female sex organs and secondary sex characteristics and are tied to the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. They are considered the main sex hormones in women and are present in small quantities in men. Estradiol (E2) is the predominant form of estrogen and is produced primarily in the ovaries with additional amounts produced by the adrenal glands in women and in the testes and adrenal glands in men. Estradiol levels are used in evaluating ovarian function. Estradiol levels are increased in cases of early (precocious) puberty in girls and gynecomastia in men. Its main use has been in the differential diagnosis of amenorrhea – for example, to determine whether the cause is menopause, pregnancy, or a medical problem. In assisted reproductive technology (ART), serial measurements are used to monitor follicle development in the ovary in the days prior to in vitro fertilization. Estradiol is also sometimes used to monitor menopausal hormone replacement therapy.

Ferritin

Ferritin is a protein found inside cells that stores iron so your body can use it later. A ferritin test indirectly measures the amount of iron in your blood. The amount of ferritin in your blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron stored in your body.

Also known as: Factor I, Fibrinogen, Fibrinogen Activity Clauss

Fibrinogen Activity,

Fibrinogen is a protein produced by the liver. This protein helps stop bleeding by helping blood clots to form. A blood test can be done to tell how much fibrinogen you have in the blood.

Also known as: Folate Serum, Folic Acid

Folate, Serum

Folate is part of the B complex of vitamins and is measures the levels of folate in the liquid portion of the blood, the serum or plasma, to detect deficiencies. Folate is necessary for normal RBC formation, tissue and cellular repair, and DNA synthesis.. A deficiency inr folate can lead to macrocytic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia, a type of macrocytic anemia, is characterized by the production of fewer but larger RBCs called macrocytes, in addition to some cellular changes in the bone marrow.

Fructosamine

Also known as: Gamma Glutamyl Transferase GGT, Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase, Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase, Gamma-GT, GGTP, GTP

Ggt

Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a test to measure the amount of the enzyme GGT in the blood.

Gastrin

Also known as: A1c, Glycated Hemoglobin, Glycohemoglobin, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, HA1c, HbA1c, Hemoglobin A1c, Hemoglobin A1c HgbA1C, Hgb A1c

Hemoglobin A1c

The A1c test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the last 2 to 3 months. It does this by measuring the concentration of glycated (also often called glycosylated) hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin is an oxygen-transporting protein found inside red blood cells (RBCs). There are several types of normal hemoglobin, but the predominant form – about 95-98% – is hemoglobin A. As glucose circulates in the blood, some of it spontaneously binds to hemoglobin A. The hemoglobin molecules with attached glucose are called glycated hemoglobin. The higher the concentration of glucose in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin is formed. Once the glucose binds to the hemoglobin, it remains there for the life of the red blood cell – normally about 120 days. The predominant form of glycated hemoglobin is referred to as HbA1c or A1c. A1c is produced on a daily basis and slowly cleared from the blood as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test is used to monitor treatment in someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes. It helps to evaluate how well their glucose levels have been controlled by treatment over time. This test may be used to screen for and diagnose diabetes or risk of developing diabetes. In 2010, clinical practice guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) stated that A1c may be added to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an option for diabetes screening and diagnosis. For monitoring purposes, an A1c of less than 7% indicates good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics. However, in 2012, the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) issued a position statement recommending that the management of glucose control in type 2 diabetes be more "patient-centered." Data from recent studies have shown that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause complications and that people with risk of severe hypoglycemia, underlying health conditions, complications, and a limited life expectancy do not necessarily benefit from having a stringent goal of less than 7% for their A1c. The statement recommends that people work closely with their doctor to select a goal that reflects each person's individual health status and that balances risks and benefits.

Also known as: Homocysteine, Homocysteine Cardiovascular

HOMOCYSTEINE,

Also known as: C-Reactive Protein, Cardio CRP, Cardio hs-CRP, CRP, High Sensitivity CRP, High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein, High-sensitivity CRP, Highly Sensitive CRP, hsCRP, Ultra-sensitive CRP

Hs Crp

A high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test may be used by itself, in combination with other cardiac risk markers, or in combination with a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) test that evaluates vascular inflammation. The hs-CRP test accurately detects low concentrations of C-reactive protein to help predict a healthy person's risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High-sensitivity CRP is promoted by some as a test for determining a person's risk level for CVD, heart attacks, and strokes. The current thinking is that hs-CRP can play a role in the evaluation process before a person develops one of these health problems.

Also known as: Insulin (fasting)

Insulin

Insulin is a hormone that is produced and stored in the beta cells of the pancreas. It is vital for the transportation and storage of glucose at the cellular level, helps regulate blood glucose levels, and has a role in lipid metabolism. When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, insulin is released to allow glucose to move into tissue cells, especially muscle and adipose (fat) cells, where is it is used for energy production. Insulin then prompts the liver to either store the remaining excess blood glucose as glycogen for short-term energy storage and/or to use it to produce fatty acids. The fatty acids are eventually used by adipose tissue to synthesize triglycerides to form the basis of a longer term, more concentrated form of energy storage. Without insulin, glucose cannot reach most of the body's cells. Without glucose, the cells starve and blood glucose levels rise to unhealthy levels. This can cause disturbances in normal metabolic processes that result in various disorders, including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and vision and neurological problems. Thus, diabetes, a disorder associated with decreased insulin effects, is eventually a life-threatening condition.

Also known as: Iron and TIBC, Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity TIBC, TIBC

% Saturation

Iron Binding Capacity

Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to see if you may have too much or too little iron in the blood. Iron moves through the blood attached to a protein called transferrin. This test helps your doctor know how well that protein can carry iron in the blood.

Iron, Total

Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries oxygen from our lungs throughout our bodies. It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and enzymes. Your body needs the right amount of iron. If you have too little iron, you may develop iron deficiency anemia. Causes of low iron levels include blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from foods. People at higher risk of having too little iron are young children and women who are pregnant or have periods.

Also known as: Lactate Dehydrogenase LD, LDH

Ld

LDH isoenzymes is a test to check how much of the different types of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are in the blood. Measurement of LDH isoenzymes helps determine the location of any tissue damage. LDH is found in many body tissues such as the heart, liver, kidney, skeletal muscle, brain, blood cells, and lungs. LDH exists in 5 forms, which differ slightly in structure. LDH-1 is found primarily in heart muscle and red blood cells. LDH-2 is concentrated in white blood cells. LDH-3 is highest in the lung. LDH-4 is highest in the kidney, placenta, and pancreas. LDH-5 is highest in the liver and skeletal muscle.

Also known as: Lipid Panel with Ratios (fasting), Lipid Profile with Ratios (fasting), Lipids

Chol/HDLC Ratio

Cholesterol, Total

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood and stick to the walls of your arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can narrow your arteries or even block them. High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase your risk of heart disease. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. You are likely to have high cholesterol if members of your family have it, if you are overweight or if you eat a lot of fatty foods. You can lower your cholesterol by exercising more and eating more fruits and vegetables. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol.

HDL Cholesterol

LDL-Cholesterol

LDL/HDL Ratio

Non HDL Cholesterol

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. This test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Most triglycerides are found in fat (adipose) tissue, but some triglycerides circulate in the blood to provide fuel for muscles to work. After a person eats, an increased level of triglycerides is found in the blood as the body converts the energy not needed right away into fat. Triglycerides move via the blood from the gut to adipose tissue for storage. In between meals, triglycerides are released from fat tissue to be used as an energy source for the body. Most triglycerides are carried in the blood by lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the reason for this is not well understood. Certain factors can contribute to high triglyceride levels and to risk of CVD, including lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking cigarettes, consuming excess alcohol, and medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease.

Magnesium

Also known as: Inorganic Phosphate, P, Phosphate as Phosphorus, Phosphorus, PO4

Phosphate (As Phosphorus)

This test is performed to see how much phosphorus in your blood. Kidney, liver, and certain bone diseases can cause abnormal phosphorus levels.

Also known as: Progesterone Immunoassay

Progesterone

Serum progesterone is a test to measure the amount of progesterone in the blood. Progesterone is a hormone produced mainly in the ovaries. In women, progesterone plays a vital role in pregnancy. After an egg is released by the ovaries (ovulation), progesterone helps make the uterus ready for implantation of a fertilized egg. It prepares the womb (uterus) for pregnancy and the breasts for milk production. Men produce some amount of progesterone, but it probably has no normal function except to help produce other steroid hormones.

Also known as: Protein Total and Protein Electrophoresis with Scan

Abnormal Protein Band 1

Abnormal Protein Band 2

Abnormal Protein Band 3

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Alpha-1-Globulins

Alpha-2-Globulins

BETA 1 GLOBULIN

BETA 2 GLOBULIN

Gamma Globulins

Interpretation

Protein, Total

The total protein is the total amount of two classes of proteins, albumin and globulin that are found in the fluid portion of your blood. Proteins are important parts of all cells and tissues. Your albumin helps prevent fluid from leaking out of blood vessels and your globulins are an important part of your immune system.

Also known as: PSA

Psa, Total

PSA stands for prostate-specific antigen. It is a protein produced by prostate cells. The PSA test is done to help diagnose and follow prostate cancer in men.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D2

Vitamin D2 ((ergocalciferol,) is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D2 is effective when it is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D3

Vitamin D3 (cholecalcifero) which comes from animals. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D3 are is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Also known as: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin SHBG, SHBG, TeBG, Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin

Sex Hormone Binding

The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test measures the concentration of SHBG in the blood. SHBG is a protein that is produced by the liver and binds tightly to testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and estradiol (an estrogen). In this bound state, it transports them in the blood as an inactive form. The amount of SHBG in circulation is affected by age and sex, by decreased or increased testosterone or estrogen production and can be affected by certain diseases and conditions such as liver disease, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, and obesity. Changes in SHBG levels can affect the amount of testosterone that is available to be used by the body's tissues. A total testosterone test does not distinguish between bound and unbound testosterone but determines the overall quantity of testosterone. If a person's SHBG level is not normal, then the total testosterone may not be an accurate representation of the amount of testosterone that is available to the person's tissues.

Also known as: Reverse T3, Reverse Triiodothyronine, RT3, T3 Reverse RT3 LCMSMS, Triiodothyronine Reverse

T3 Reverse, LC/MS/MS

Reverse T3 produced in the thyroid comes from the conversion of the storage hormone T4. Your body, especially the liver, can constantly be converting T4 to RT3 as a way to get rid of any unneeded T4. In any given day approx. 40% of T4 goes to T3 and 20% of T4 goes to Reverse T3. However in any situation where your body needs to conserve energy and focus on something else, it will change the above percentages, changing the conversion of RT3 to 50% or more, and the T3 goes down, down. Examples are emotional, physical, or biological stress, such as being chronically or acutely sick (the flu, pneumonia, etc), after surgery, after a car accident or any acute injury, chronic stress causing high cortisol, being exposed to an extremely cold environment, diabetes, aging, or even being on drugs like beta blockers and amiodarone.

Also known as: Triiodothyronine

T3, Total

Triiodothyronine (T3) is a thyroid hormone. It plays an important role in the body's control of metabolism.

Also known as: Free T3, FT3, T3 Free

T3, Free

This test measures the amount of triiodothyronine, or T3, in the blood.

Also known as: Free T4, FT4, T4 Free

T4, Free

The free T4 test is not affected by protein levels. Since free T4 is the active form of thyroxine, the free T4 test is may be a more accurate reflection of thyroid hormone function.

Also known as: Testosterone Free Bioavailable and Total LCMSMS

Albumin

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. A serum albumin test measures the amount of this protein in the clear liquid portion of the blood.

Sex Hormone Binding

The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test measures the concentration of SHBG in the blood. SHBG is a protein that is produced by the liver and binds tightly to testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and estradiol (an estrogen). In this bound state, it transports them in the blood as an inactive form. The amount of SHBG in circulation is affected by age and sex, by decreased or increased testosterone or estrogen production and can be affected by certain diseases and conditions such as liver disease, hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, and obesity. Changes in SHBG levels can affect the amount of testosterone that is available to be used by the body's tissues. A total testosterone test does not distinguish between bound and unbound testosterone but determines the overall quantity of testosterone. If a person's SHBG level is not normal, then the total testosterone may not be an accurate representation of the amount of testosterone that is available to the person's tissues.

TESTOSTERONE, FREE

TESTOSTERONE, TOTAL,

A testosterone test measures the amount of the male hormone, testosterone, in the blood. Both men and women produce this hormone. In males, the testicles produce most of the testosterone in the body. Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of low testosterone: In boys -- early or late puberty and in men -- impotence, low level of sexual interest, infertility, thinning of the bones In females, the ovaries produce most of the testosterone and levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of higher testosterone levels, such as: decreased breast size, excess hair growth, increased size of the clitoris. irregular or absent menstrual periods and male-pattern baldness or hair thinning.

TESTOSTERONE,BIOAVAILABLE

Free T4 Index (T7)

FTI stands for the Free Thyroxine Index and is also sometimes referred to as T7. It is a calculated value determined from the T3 uptake test and total T4 test and provides an estimate of the level of free T4 in the blood.

T3 Uptake

T3 uptake is also known as T3 Resin Uptake (T3RU) or Thyroid Uptake. It estimates how much thyroid hormone-binding proteins are available in the blood through a calculation based on levels of T3 or T4 added to a person's blood specimen.

T4 (Thyroxine), Total

This test measures the amount of thyroxine, or T4, in the blood. T4 is one of two major hormones produced by the thyroid gland. The total T4 test is used to help diagnose hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. It is a useful test but can be affected by the amount of protein available in the blood to bind to the hormone.

Thyroglobulin Antibodies

Measurement of thyroglobulin antibodies is useful in the diagnosis and management of a variety of thyroid disorders including Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves Disease and certain types of goiter.

Thyroid Peroxidase

Also known as: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyrotropin

TSH

A TSH test is a lab test that measures the amount of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland. It tells the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the blood.

TSH

Also known as: Serum Urate, UA

Uric Acid

Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some foods and drinks. These include liver, anchovies, mackerel, dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. From there, it passes out in urine. If your body produces too much uric acid or doesn't remove enough if it, you can get sick. A high level of uric acid in the blood is called hyperuricemia.

Also known as: B12, B12 Vitamin, Cobalamin, Cyanocobalamin, Vitamin B12 Cobalamin

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 is part of the B complex of vitamins and measurea the levels of vitamin B12 in the liquid portion of the blood, the serum or plasma, to detect deficiencies. Cobalamine, or vitamin B12, is found in animal products such as red meat, fish, poultry, milk, yogurt, and eggs and is not produced in the human body. In recent years, fortified cereals, breads, and other grain products have also become important dietary sources of B12. Vitamin B12 is necessary for normal RBC formation, tissue and cellular repair, and DNA synthesis. B12 is important for nerve health. A deficiency in B12 can lead to macrocytic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia, a type of macrocytic anemia, is characterized by the production of fewer but larger RBCs called macrocytes, in addition to some cellular changes in the bone marrow. B12 deficiency can lead to varying degrees of neuropathy, nerve damage that can cause tingling and numbness in the affected person's hands and feet.

Also known as: Very Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, VLDL, VLDL-C

Cholesterol, Very Low

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. This test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Most triglycerides are found in fat (adipose) tissue, but some triglycerides circulate in the blood to provide fuel for muscles to work. After a person eats, an increased level of triglycerides is found in the blood as the body converts the energy not needed right away into fat. Triglycerides move via the blood from the gut to adipose tissue for storage. In between meals, triglycerides are released from fat tissue to be used as an energy source for the body. Most triglycerides are carried in the blood by lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the reason for this is not well understood. Certain factors can contribute to high triglyceride levels and to risk of CVD, including lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking cigarettes, consuming excess alcohol, and medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease.

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Patient Service Center
1009 W Main St
Marion, Illinois 62959 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-899-9193
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm

Patient Service Center
Mobile Phlebotomy Service
Rolling Meadows, Illinois 60008 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-923-4982
Hours

Mon – Thu: 7:00 am – 7:00 pm 
Sat: 8:00 am – 12:00 pm 

Premium Draw Fee: $35.00 

Appointments are required. Please call 630-923-4982 to schedule an appointment. 

Service area: 30–mile radius from zip code 60008


Patient Service Center
6926 N University St Ste F Tanglewood Shopping Plaza
Peoria, Illinois 61614 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 309-692-1485
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:30 pm

Patient Service Center
900 W. Temple Building B
Effingham, Illinois 62401 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-347-1690
Hours
  • M-Su 10:00 am-8:00 pm

Patient Service Center
650 West Taylor Street
Vandalia, Illinois 62471 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-283-5485
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-6:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
13550 Route 30, Suite 100
Plainfield, Illinois 60544 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 331-300-9816
Hours

Mon – Fri:

Premium Draw Fee: $25 for Yorkville, Aurora, Montgomery, and Plainfield

Appointments are required. Please call 331-300-9816 or use the link to schedule an appointment.

Service area:

Yorkville, Aurora, Montgomery, and Plainfield


Patient Service Center
Mobile Lab Services
Oswego, Illinois 60543 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-277-9456
Hours

Appointments are required. Please call 630-277-9456 to schedule an appointment.

Service area: 30-miles from 60453


Patient Service Center
303 S Commercial St Ste 10
Harrisburg, Illinois 62946 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-252-5555
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:30 pm

Patient Service Center
390 Maple Summit Rd
Jerseyville, Illinois 62052 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-498-8375
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-5:00 pm

Patient Service Center
704 S Hackman St
Staunton, Illinois 62088 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-635-2502
Hours
  • M-F 9:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-5:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-4:00 pm

Patient Service Center
6374 N Lincoln Ave Ste 201
Chicago, Illinois 60659 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 773-539-5573
Hours
  • M-F 9:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 9:00 am-2:00 pm

Patient Service Center
237b E Center Dr
Alton, Illinois 62002 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-465-5877
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 9:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1100 W Central Rd Ste 402
Arlington Heights, Illinois 60005 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-342-0355
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2088 Ogden Ave Ste 240
Aurora, Illinois 60504 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-692-1539
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
22285 Pepper Rd Ste 107
Barrington, Illinois 60010 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 224-213-0196
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1180 W Wilson St Ste D
Batavia, Illinois 60510 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-406-6525
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
7050 S Cicero Ave
Bedford Park, Illinois 60638 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 708-929-0181
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3030 Frank Scott Pkwy W Ste 5
Belleville, Illinois 62223 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-978-4070
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 9:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
159 E Macarthur Dr
Bethalto, Illinois 62010 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-484-8438
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
303 E Army Trail Rd Ste 111
Bloomingdale, Illinois 60108 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-351-0516
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:00 am & 12:00 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
314 W Army Trail Rd
Bloomingdale, Illinois 60108 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-439-7660
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
503 N Prospect Rd Ste 309
Bloomington, Illinois 61704 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 309-663-8823
Hours
  • M 8:00 am-1:00 pm & 2:00 pm-5:00 pm | T-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M 9:00 am-1:00 pm & 2:00 pm-4:30 pm | T-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-3:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-10:30 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
484 W Boughton Rd Ste 100
Bolingbrook, Illinois 60440 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-759-3773
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:30 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
175 E Bethel Dr
Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 815-592-3312
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-1:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-10:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
900 East Walnut St Ste 4
Carbondale, Illinois 62901 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-301-0671
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2107 S Neil St
Champaign, Illinois 61820 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-355-9865
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
111 N Wabash Ave Ste 1514
Chicago, Illinois 60602 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 312-332-5960
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1431 N Western Ave Ste 509
Chicago, Illinois 60622 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 773-227-4349
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1460 N Halsted St Ste 201
Chicago, Illinois 60642 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 224-301-4687
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3000 N Halsted Ste 604
Chicago, Illinois 60657 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 773-477-4783
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4126 N Milwaukee Ave
Chicago, Illinois 60641 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 773-736-3814
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 10:00 am-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4801 W Peterson Ave Ste 205
Chicago, Illinois 60646 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 312-261-0747
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 9:30 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1103 Belt Line Rd
Collinsville, Illinois 62234 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-344-8376
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1000 Eleven S Ste 2H
Columbia, Illinois 62236 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-301-0623
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4005 167Th St
Country Club Hills, Illinois 60478 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 708-957-6868
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-2:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
260 E Congress Pkwy Ste E
Crystal Lake, Illinois 60014 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 815-459-5217
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2905 N Main St Ste B
Decatur, Illinois 62526 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-329-4524
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3244 Sycamore Rd Unit B
DeKalb, Illinois 60115 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 815-901-3268
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:30 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 6:30 am-2:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-11:30 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
885 S Randall Rd
Elgin, Illinois 60123 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-857-0359
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-4:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-11:00 am
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-10:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
800 Austin St East Tower Ste 457
Evanston, Illinois 60202 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-450-4779
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:30 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-11:30 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
17 Ginger Creek Mdws
Glen Carbon, Illinois 62034 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-201-1397
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2551 Compass Rd Ste 120
Glenview, Illinois 60026 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-998-8909
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-3:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:30 am-2:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
15 Tower Ct Ste 170
Gurnee, Illinois 60031 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-360-1073
Hours
  • M-F 5:30 am-5:00 pm | Sa 5:30 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2500 W Higgins Rd Ste 460
Hoffman Estates, Illinois 60169 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-781-0741
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-5:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 9:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
310 N Hammes Ave Ste 102
Joliet, Illinois 60435 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 779-702-0246
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
17665 Torrence Ave
Lansing, Illinois 60438 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 708-315-8951
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2340 S Highland Ave Ste 330
Lombard, Illinois 60148 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-932-2175
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
340 E North Ave
Lombard, Illinois 60148 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-932-6647
Hours
  • M-F 7:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2136 Vadalabene Dr Ste A
Maryville, Illinois 62062 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-288-4163
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 9:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
19070 Everett Blvd Unit 111
Mokena, Illinois 60448 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 708-479-1193
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-2:30 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4 Cusumano Professional Plaza Dr Suite B
Mount Vernon, Illinois 62864 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-343-5735
Hours
  • M-Th 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | F 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Th 9:00 am-11:00 am & 1:00 pm-3:00 pm | F 9:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
4 Cusumano Professional Plaza Dr Suite B
Mount Vernon, Illinois 62864 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-343-5735
Hours
  • M-Th 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | F 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Th 9:00 am-11:00 am & 1:00 pm-3:00 pm | F 9:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
640 S Washington St Ste 140
Naperville, Illinois 60540 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-778-9606
Hours
  • M-F 5:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 5:30 am-3:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
9046 W 159Th St
Orland Park, Illinois 60462 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 312-273-0530
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1600 Dempster St Ste 218
Park Ridge, Illinois 60068 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-795-0205
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
12690 S Route 59 Ste 1
Plainfield, Illinois 60585 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 815-556-2011
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:30 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
641 Highgrove Pl
Rockford, Illinois 61108 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 815-229-0219
Hours
  • M-F 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm

Patient Service Center
5901 E Riverside Blvd
Rockford, Illinois 61114 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 779-221-1482
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-8:00 pm | Sa 8:30 am-4:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:30 am-3:30 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
2680 N Il Route 83
Round Lake Beach, Illinois 60073 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 847-245-1525
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-2:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-11:00 am

Patient Service Center
808 E Woodfield Rd Ste 400
Schaumburg, Illinois 60173 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 224-301-7530
Hours
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1197 Fortune Blvd Ste 2
Shiloh, Illinois 62269 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-484-8979
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-1:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
3119 Robbins Rd
Springfield, Illinois 62704 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-685-4227
Hours
  • M-Th 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | F 7:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-Th 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 1:00 pm-4:00 pm | F 8:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
108 W Us Highway 40
Troy, Illinois 62294 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-472-4865
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-2:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-12:00 pm & 12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
565 Lakeview Pkwy Ste 100
Vernon Hills, Illinois 60061 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 224-213-1177
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-3:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
1113 Fairview Ave
Westmont, Illinois 60559 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-353-0597
Hours
  • M-F 6:30 am-4:00 pm | Sa 6:30 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 8:00 am-2:00 pm | Sa 8:00 am-11:00 am TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
7530 Woodward Ave Ste G
Woodridge, Illinois 60517 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 630-910-1142
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-11:30 am & 12:30 pm-3:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-11:30 am & 12:30 pm-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
507 W Kendall Dr Ste 12
Yorkville, Illinois 60560 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 331-442-7238
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-3:30 pm | Sa 6:00 am-12:00 pm
  • Drug Screen
  • M-F 7:30 am-3:00 pm | Sa 6:30 am-11:30 am

Patient Service Center
10837 S Cicero Ave Ste 310
Oak Lawn, Illinois 60453 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 312-561-0965
Hours
  • M-F 7:00 am-4:00 pm | Sa 7:00 am-12:00 pm TSPOT: M-F 8:00 am-1:00 pm

Patient Service Center
17w300 22nd St.
Oak Brook Terr, Illinois 60181 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 312-816-9374
Hours

Premium Draw Fee: $30

Appointments are required. Please call 312-816-9374 to schedule an appointment.

Service area

20-mile radius


Patient Service Center
4143 Sauk Trail
Richton Park, Illinois 60471 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 844-836-2867
Hours

Mon - Fri: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sat: By Appointment only.

Appointments are required.. Please call 844-836-2867 to schedule an appointment.


Patient Service Center
500 W North Street
Springfield, Illinois 62704 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-299-3633
Hours

Mon - Fri: 6:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sat: 7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Appointments are required. Please call or text 217-299-3633 to schedule an appointment. 


Patient Service Center
Mobile Lab Services
Decatur, Illinois 62526 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-299-3633
Hours

Mon - Fri: 6:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sat: 7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Appointments are required. Please call or text 217-299-3633 to schedule an appointment. 

Service area: 40-miles from Decatur, IL.


Patient Service Center
Mobile Lab Services
Peoria, Illinois 61604 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 217-299-3633
Hours

Mon - Fri: 6:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sat: 7:00 am - 12:00 pm

Appointments are required. Please call or text 217-299-3633 to schedule an appointment.

Service area: 40-miles from Peoria, IL.


Patient Service Center
610 North Court Street
Grayville, Illinois 62844 Map Map
Distance 0.00 miles
Phone 618-375-7101
Hours
  • M-W 8:00 am-10:00 am