MD - Wellness Comprehensive Most Popular

The MD - Wellness Comprehensive panel contains 11 tests with 22 biomarkers.

  • C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) [ 10124 ]
  • Ferritin [ 457 ]
  • Homocysteine [ 31789 ]
  • Magnesium, RBC [ 623 ]
  • Omega-3 and -6 Fatty Acids, Plasma [ 91001 ]
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS [ 92888 ]
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS [ 90963 ]
  • T3, Free [ 34429 ]
  • T4, Free [ 866 ]
  • Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies [ 7260 ]
  • TSH [ 899 ]

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Ferritin

Ferritin is a protein found inside cells that stores iron so your body can use it later. A ferritin test indirectly measures the amount of iron in your blood. The amount of ferritin in your blood (serum ferritin level) is directly related to the amount of iron stored in your body.

Also known as: Homocysteine, Homocysteine Cardiovascular

HOMOCYSTEINE,

Also known as: C-Reactive Protein, Cardio CRP, Cardio hs-CRP, CRP, High Sensitivity CRP, High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein, High-sensitivity CRP, Highly Sensitive CRP, hsCRP, Ultra-sensitive CRP

Hs Crp

A high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test may be used by itself, in combination with other cardiac risk markers, or in combination with a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) test that evaluates vascular inflammation. The hs-CRP test accurately detects low concentrations of C-reactive protein to help predict a healthy person's risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High-sensitivity CRP is promoted by some as a test for determining a person's risk level for CVD, heart attacks, and strokes. The current thinking is that hs-CRP can play a role in the evaluation process before a person develops one of these health problems.

Also known as: Magnesium RBC

Magnesium, Rbc

About half of the body's magnesium is found in bone. The other half is found inside cells of body tissues and organs. Magnesium is needed for nearly all chemical processes in the body. It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, and keeps the bones strong. Magnesium is also needed for the heart to function normally and to help regulate blood pressure. Magnesium also helps the body control blood sugar level and helps support the body's defense (immune) system.

Also known as: Arachidonic Acid (AA), Arachidonic Acid/EPA Ratio, DHA, EPA, Omega-3 Index, Omega-6/omega-3 Ratio, Omega3 and 6 Fatty Acids Plasma, Phospholipid Omega-3 Fatty Acid, Phospholipid Omega-6 Fatty Acid, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs)

ARACHIDONIC ACID

Arachidonic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain, muscles, and liver. In addition to being involved in cellular signaling as a lipid second messenger involved in the regulation of signaling enzymes, such as PLC-γ, PLC-δ, and PKC-α, -β, and -γ isoforms, arachidonic acid is a key inflammatory intermediate and can also act as a vasodilator

ARACHIDONIC ACID/EPA

Arachidonic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain, muscles, and liver. In addition to being involved in cellular signaling as a lipid second messenger involved in the regulation of signaling enzymes, such as PLC-γ, PLC-δ, and PKC-α, -β, and -γ isoforms, arachidonic acid is a key inflammatory intermediate and can also act as a vasodilator

DHA

The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are found in seafood, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, tuna, and trout) and shellfish (e.g., crab, mussels, and oysters).

EPA

The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are found in seafood, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, tuna, and trout) and shellfish (e.g., crab, mussels, and oysters).

OMEGA 3 (EPA+DHA) INDEX

Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Humans must eat them through food, which means getting EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from seafood, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel or shellfish, and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) from sources such as walnuts, flaxseed, and canola and soybean oils. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA and DHA, have been shown to benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk for — or who already have — cardiovascular disease.

OMEGA 6/OMEGA 3 RATIO

Omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are the other group of essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Hence, they need to be consumed in the diet. Food sources of omega-6 fatty acids include some vegetable oils (soybean, safflower, sunflower or corn oils), nuts and seeds. Increased consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in place of saturated fats and trans fats is associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease.

RISK

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D2

Vitamin D2 ((ergocalciferol,) is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D2 is effective when it is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D3

Vitamin D3 (cholecalcifero) which comes from animals. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D3 are is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Also known as: Reverse T3, Reverse Triiodothyronine, RT3, T3 Reverse RT3 LCMSMS, Triiodothyronine Reverse

T3 Reverse, LC/MS/MS

Reverse T3 produced in the thyroid comes from the conversion of the storage hormone T4. Your body, especially the liver, can constantly be converting T4 to RT3 as a way to get rid of any unneeded T4. In any given day approx. 40% of T4 goes to T3 and 20% of T4 goes to Reverse T3. However in any situation where your body needs to conserve energy and focus on something else, it will change the above percentages, changing the conversion of RT3 to 50% or more, and the T3 goes down, down. Examples are emotional, physical, or biological stress, such as being chronically or acutely sick (the flu, pneumonia, etc), after surgery, after a car accident or any acute injury, chronic stress causing high cortisol, being exposed to an extremely cold environment, diabetes, aging, or even being on drugs like beta blockers and amiodarone.

Also known as: Free T3, FT3, T3 Free

T3, Free

This test measures the amount of triiodothyronine, or T3, in the blood.

Also known as: Free T4, FT4, T4 Free

T4, Free

The free T4 test is not affected by protein levels. Since free T4 is the active form of thyroxine, the free T4 test is may be a more accurate reflection of thyroid hormone function.

Thyroglobulin Antibodies

Measurement of thyroglobulin antibodies is useful in the diagnosis and management of a variety of thyroid disorders including Hashimoto's thyroiditis, Graves Disease and certain types of goiter.

Thyroid Peroxidase

Also known as: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyrotropin

TSH

A TSH test is a lab test that measures the amount of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland. It tells the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the blood.

TSH

*Process times are an estimate and are not guaranteed. The lab may need additional time due to weather, holidays, confirmation/repeat testing, or equipment maintenance.

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