Diabetes Health

Order your diabetes blood tests to check for and to monitor diabetes. Get your blood checked on a routine basis with our Diabetes lab panels designed for everyone with diabetes or who is at risk of diabetes to stay on top of their general health. Take control and learn about your health with Ulta Lab Tests.


Name Matches
Identifying patients who have metabolic syndrome and who are thus at higher risk of diabetes, coronary heart disease or stroke. Identifying patients who are insulin resistant (fasting insulin at or above the 75th percentile) and who are thus at higher risk of diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, or liver disease. Monitoring of risk factors and insulin levels after life style change, medication use, or both.

Cardio IQ® Diabetes Risk Panel with Score - 

Includes
Cardio IQ® Glucose; Cardio IQ® Hemoglobin A1c; Cardio IQ® Cholesterol, Total; Cardio IQ® HDL Cholesterol; Cardio IQ® Triglycerides; Cardio IQ® Non-HDL and Calculated Components; Cardio IQ® 8 Year Diabetes Risk

If Triglyceride is >400 mg/dL, Cardio IQ® Direct LDL will be performed at an additional charge (CPT code(s): 83721).

Clinical Significance

Permit the assessment of serum glucose levels and lipid levels and the prediction of the 8-year future risk of developing diabetes mellitus in patients without diabetes mellitus.

• Assess risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus
• Identify lifestyle interventions and/or pharmacotherapy
• This test provides an 8-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes mellitus is defined as a deficiency of insulin secretion. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for greater than 90% of all diabetes cases, is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and an inadequate compensatory insulin secretion.

Type 2 diabetes frequently goes undiagnosed, because it has no classic symptoms of diabetes and it progresses slowly from a pre-diabetic state. 

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 37% of individuals that are greater than 20 years old and approximately  half of those are greater than 65 years old have pre-diabetes. These individuals are at high risk for progression to type 2 diabetes and are candidates for preventive therapy that include lifestyle modification, such as weight  loss, increased physical activity, and medication.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)

Diabetes Risk Panel with Score

• Assess risk for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus
• Identify lifestyle interventions and/or pharmacotherapy
• This test provides an 8-year risk of developing type 2 diabetes
Type 1 diabetes mellitus is defined as a deficiency of insulin secretion. Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for greater than 90% of all diabetes cases, is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and an inadequate compensatory insulin secretion.

Type 2 diabetes frequently goes undiagnosed, because it has no classic symptoms of diabetes and it progresses slowly from a pre-diabetic state. 
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 37% of individuals that are greater than 20 years old and approximately  half of those are greater than 65 years old have pre-diabetes. These individuals are at high risk for progression to type 2 diabetes and are candidates for preventive therapy that include lifestyle modification, such as weight  loss, increased physical activity, and medication.

IMPORTANT: For risk calculations to be performed, the following patient-specific information must be provided and recorded at the time of specimen collection:

  • Age: Years 
  • Gender: M (for male) or F (for female) 
  • Height Feet: Feet 
  • Height Inches: Inches 
  • Weight: lbs 
  • Race-African American: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Systolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure: mmHg
  • Treatment for High B.P.: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Diabetes Status: Y (for yes) or N (for no)
  • Parental History of Diab: Y (for yes) or N (for no) 
  • Smoking Status: Y (for Yes) or N (for no)

 


This panel is designed for individuals diagnosed as having diabetes mellitus whose kidney disease has advanced to Stage 3/4 impairment. The panel affords the opportunity to assess electrolytes, phosphorus, serum creatinine/eGFR, hemoglobin, microalbumin, parathyroid hormone, calcium, and vitamin D. The grouping of these tests, readily identifiable as elements that adhere to guideline recommendations, is intended to facilitate the ready adherence to professional society clinical practice guidelines. Components of the testing related to the Management of CKD in diabetes, as outlined in the Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2013. These recommendations are in broad agreement with those published by the National Kidney Foundation and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists.

A Hemoglobin (Hb) A1c Blood Test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood. The A1c test will help determine whether you are at a higher risk of developing diabetes; to help diagnose diabetes and prediabetes; to monitor diabetes and to aid in treatment decisions.

To assist with control of blood glucose levels, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended glycated hemoglobin testing (HbA1c) twice a year for patients with stable glycemia, and quarterly for patients with poor glucose control. Interpretative ranges are based on ADA guidelines.


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Dipstick urinalysis is important in accessing the chemical constituents in the urine and the relationship to various disease states. Microscopic examination helps to detect the presence of cells and other formed elements.

NOTE: Only measurable biomarkers will be reported.


See individual tests

Clinical Significance

Rheumatoid Arthritis Diagnostic IdentRA® Panel 2 - Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ie, diagnosis before significant joint erosion occurs, is difficult. Psoriatic arthritis can also be difficult to diagnose clinically early in the disease process, and there are no specific biomarkers. The 14-3-3η (eta) protein is an emerging biomarker for RA and erosive psoriatic arthritis diagnosis. It may play a biologic role in the joint erosive process. Blood levels appear to be elevated in patients with RA, but not in other diseases including psoriasis, osteoporosis, gout, ulcerative colitis, type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, Crohn disease, primary Sjögren syndrome, scleroderma, and multiple sclerosis. The 14-3-3η protein, used in conjunction with rheumatoid factor (RF) and cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody, may improve diagnostic sensitivity in the early diagnosis of RA. It may also help differentiate those with psoriatic arthritis joint damage from those without joint damage.


Excessive formation of ketone bodies (acetone) results in increased blood levels (ketonemia) and increased excretion in the urine (ketonuria). This condition is associated with a decreased availability of carbohydrates, such as dieting or decreased use of carbohydrates. Diabetes and alcohol consumption are common causes of ketoacidosis. Acetone is one ketone body formed from acetoacetate. Ingestion of isopropyl alcohol also leads to the formation of acetone.

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The adiponectin ELISA assay quantitatively measures human adiponectin in serum. It has been shown that decreased expression of adiponectin correlates with insulin resistance. Adiponectin appears to be a potent insulin enhancer linking adipose tissue and whole body glucose metabolism.


C-Peptide is useful in the evaluation of pancreatic beta cell function and for determining the source of insulin in patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

Peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e., insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-Peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-Peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

C-peptide is useful in distinguishing insulin-secreting tumors, i.e. , insulinomas, from exogenous insulin administration. C-peptide concentrations are severely depressed or absent in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. C-peptide is also useful in monitoring patients who have received islet cell or pancreatic transplants. It is also measured as an additional means for evaluating glucose tolerance and glibenclamide-glucose tests.

HDL Cholesterol is inversely related to the risk for cardiovascular disease. It increases following regular exercise, moderate alcohol consumption and with oral estrogen therapy. Decreased levels are associated with obesity, stress, cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus.

To assist with control of blood glucose levels, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) has recommended glycated hemoglobin testing (HbA1c) twice a year for patients with stable glycemia, and quarterly for patients with poor glucose control. Interpretive ranges are based on ADA guidelines

Serum Triglyceride analysis has proven useful in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus, nephrosis, liver obstruction, other diseases involving lipid metabolism, and various endocrine disorders. In conjunction with high density lipoprotein and total serum cholesterol, a triglyceride determination provides valuable information for the assessment of coronary heart disease risk.

HDL cholesterol is inversely related to the risk for cardiovascular disease. It increases following regular exercise, moderate alcohol consumption and with oral estrogen therapy. Decreased levels are associated with obesity, stress, cigarette smoking and diabetes mellitus.

The Copeptin test is used in the diagnosis of central diabetes insipidus and in the differential diagnosis of central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. It is a reliable surrogate marker for arginine vasopressin (AVP).


This panel is designed to evaluate a patient for the presence of potentially reversible (i.e., secondary) causes of dementia such as Vitamin B12 deficiency, hypothyroidism, hypoparathyroidism, anemia, hypoxia or hypercapnia, hepatic and renal encephalopathies, diabetes, and dehydration. The panel includes a Complete Blood Count, TSH, Vitamin B12, Folate, and a Comprehensive Metabolic Panel. It is modeled after the recommendations of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), a National Institutes of Health Consensus Panel, the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS), and others.1-4


The American Diabetes Association estimates that over 34 million Americans have diabetes. Diabetes can affect all ages, races, and ethnicities, but studies show it is most common in Native Americans and individuals over 45. 

While diabetes can seem scary, there are several ways to manage the disease successfully. Before you can do that, however, you need to get an official diagnosis. 

Ulta Lab Tests offers a number of diabetes blood tests that can be used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diabetes. To learn about which test could be right for you, keep reading. 

What Is Diabetes?

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), diabetes affects how a person's body turns food into energy. Blood sugar and diabetes are directly related. The condition is often chronic and can require medication and other forms of medical intervention. 

Most of the food we eat is broken down into sugar. That sugar, sometimes called glucose, is released into the bloodstream, which triggers the pancreas to release insulin. Insulin is what helps convert blood sugar into energy. 

When someone has diabetes, it means their body doesn't make enough insulin or can't use the insulin it makes. As a result, blood sugar levels in the bloodstream become elevated and cause serious problems like vision loss, kidney disease, and heart disease. 

Risk Factors and Causes of Diabetes 

The most common risk factors associated with diabetes include family history and being overweight. 

The risk factors and causes of diabetes are often related to the type of diabetes a person is diagnosed with. There are three types: type 1, type 2, and gestational. 

Type 1 diabetes only affects five to ten percent of the people who are diagnosed with diabetes. Doctors believe type 1 is caused by an autoimmune response. Children, teens, and young adults are most often diagnosed with type 1. 

Type 2 diabetes affects 90 to 95 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes. The condition develops over the years and is typically diagnosed in adulthood. However, it can be prevented or delayed with lifestyle changes. 

Gestational diabetes develops in pregnant women who have never had a prior diabetes diagnosis. This type of diabetes typically goes away after a woman gives birth, but the condition can put the baby at a higher risk for health problems. 

Recognizing the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes 

The signs and symptoms of diabetes can mimic other conditions, so you may need to get your blood sugar tested if you are experiencing frequent urination, extreme thirst, unexplained weight loss, blurry vision, or fatigued. Other signs include very dry skin, slow-to-heal sores, and an extreme appetite. 

The symptoms can also vary depending on the type of diabetes you have. Type 1 patients often experience nausea, vomiting, and stomach pains, while type 2 patients often experience varying symptoms over some years. Gestational diabetes does not usually present symptoms. 

Screening, Diagnosing, and Monitoring Diabetes 

At Ulta Lab Tests, we offer a wide range of testing options to help you screen, diagnose, and monitor diabetes. Your doctor may order the following tests: 

  • Glucose. A glucose screening test measures your blood sugar levels at the time you're tested. 
  • Hemoglobin A1c. The A1c test measures your blood sugar levels over two to three months and averages them. 
  • Glucose Tolerance. A glucose tolerance test measures your blood sugar before and after you drink a liquid containing glucose. 
  • Urine Albumin and Creatine. If your doctor tests for urine albumin and creatine, they'll determine if there is an abnormal amount of protein in your urine. 
  • Insulin. An insulin test can determine how your pancreas produces beta cells. 
  • C-Peptide. This test can help your doctor determine the cause of your low blood sugar. 
  • Islet Autoantibodies. This test helps identify type 1 diabetes. 
  • Fructosamine. A fructosamine test monitors your blood sugar levels over time. 
  • eGFR. Also known as a glomerular filtration test, this test checks to see if your kidneys are functioning properly. 
  • Lipid Panel. A lipid panel is used to evaluate your heart health by looking at the cholesterol levels in your blood. 

Once you have a diagnosis, you can order diabetes health lab panels. For example, some of the tests you could order include the following: 

  • DH-4. Diabetes Health - C-Reactive Protein, CBC, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, Glucose, Glucose Tolerance Test, Hemoglobin A1c, Insulin, Insulin Response to Glucose, Lipid Panel, Microalbumin 
  • DH-3. Diabetes Health - C-Reactive Protein, CBC, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Insulin, Lipid Panel, Microalbumin
  • DH-2. Diabetes Health - CBC, Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c, Lipid Panel, Microalbumin 
  • DH-1. Diabetes Health - Comprehensive Metabolic Panel, Glucose, Hemoglobin A1c
  • DH-4. Diabetes Health Plus - Adiponectin, Apolipoprotein A1 B, C-Peptide, Fructosamine, Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase-65 Antibody, GlycoMark, IA-2 Antibody, Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ, Proinsulin, Urinalysis 
  • DH-3. Diabetes Health Plus - Adiponectin, C-Peptide, Fructosamine, Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase-65 Antibody, GlycoMark, Proinsulin, Urinalysis 
  • DH-2. Diabetes Health Plus - Adiponectin, Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase-65 Antibody, GlycoMark, Proinsulin 
  • DH-1. Diabetes Health Plus - Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase-65 Antibody, GlycoMark

Once you're aware of the condition you're dealing with, you and your doctor can develop a detailed treatment plan. In many instances, diabetes can be self-managed with medication and diet. 

Frequently Asked Questions About Diabetes Blood Tests

If you're having diabetes blood tests drawn, you probably have some questions about the process and the tests. Let's take a look at the most frequently asked questions.

What is the recommended blood sugar range?

The recommended blood glucose range is 80-130 before a meal and less than 180 two hours after a meal. 

Why does blood sugar matter?

It's important to keep your blood sugar under control. When levels stay high for too long, it can cause damage to arteries and veins. That damage could result in a heart attack, stroke, vision problems, or even death. 

What is A1c?

A1c, also called Hemoglobin A1c, is a two to three-month average of your blood sugars. The test indicates your blood sugar levels and can help those with diabetes determine how well they manage their condition. 

Can stress increase blood sugar levels?

Stress, as well as illness, can elevate blood sugar. So if you're feeling particularly stressed and already require insulin when you aren't, you may require more medication during those times. 

When is the best time to test your blood sugar?

If you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will likely need to check your blood sugar two to three times a week. If you've been recently diagnosed, monitoring your levels two to four times a day may be necessary. 

Living with diabetes doesn't have to affect the quality of your life if you know how to manage the condition and stay on top of your blood sugar levels. 

Learn More About Lab Testing From Ulta Lab Tests

There are several benefits to ordering diabetes blood tests from Ulta Lab Tests. First and foremost, our tests are highly accurate and reliable. With your secure and confidential results, you'll be able to make informed and proactive decisions about your health. 

It's also important to know that you won't need a physician's referral or health insurance to ordering testing through us. Simply order your lab tests today, and you'll have most test results back within one to two days. 

Take control of your health today by ordering your diabetes tests from Ulta Lab Tests.