Advanced Heart Health - Advanced

The Advanced Heart Health - Advanced panel contains 13 tests with 40 biomarkers.

The following is a list of what is included in the item above. Click the test(s) below to view what biomarkers are measured along with an explanation of what the biomarker is measuring.

Also known as: C-Reactive Protein, Cardio CRP, Cardio hs-CRP, CRP, High Sensitivity CRP, High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein, High-sensitivity CRP, Highly Sensitive CRP, hsCRP, Ultra-sensitive CRP

Hs Crp

A high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) test may be used by itself, in combination with other cardiac risk markers, or in combination with a lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) test that evaluates vascular inflammation. The hs-CRP test accurately detects low concentrations of C-reactive protein to help predict a healthy person's risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High-sensitivity CRP is promoted by some as a test for determining a person's risk level for CVD, heart attacks, and strokes. The current thinking is that hs-CRP can play a role in the evaluation process before a person develops one of these health problems.

CRP, HIGH SENSITIVITY

Also known as: Lipid Panel with Ratios (fasting), Lipid Profile with Ratios (fasting), Lipids

Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a form of fat and a major source of energy for the body. This test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood. Most triglycerides are found in fat (adipose) tissue, but some triglycerides circulate in the blood to provide fuel for muscles to work. After a person eats, an increased level of triglycerides is found in the blood as the body converts the energy not needed right away into fat. Triglycerides move via the blood from the gut to adipose tissue for storage. In between meals, triglycerides are released from fat tissue to be used as an energy source for the body. Most triglycerides are carried in the blood by lipoproteins called very low density lipoproteins (VLDL). High levels of triglycerides in the blood are associated with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), although the reason for this is not well understood. Certain factors can contribute to high triglyceride levels and to risk of CVD, including lack of exercise, being overweight, smoking cigarettes, consuming excess alcohol, and medical conditions such as diabetes and kidney disease.

Cholesterol, Total

Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that occurs naturally in all parts of the body. Your body needs some cholesterol to work properly. But if you have too much in your blood, it can combine with other substances in the blood and stick to the walls of your arteries. This is called plaque. Plaque can narrow your arteries or even block them. High levels of cholesterol in the blood can increase your risk of heart disease. Your cholesterol levels tend to rise as you get older. There are usually no signs or symptoms that you have high blood cholesterol, but it can be detected with a blood test. You are likely to have high cholesterol if members of your family have it, if you are overweight or if you eat a lot of fatty foods. You can lower your cholesterol by exercising more and eating more fruits and vegetables. You also may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol.

HDL Cholesterol

LDL-Cholesterol

Chol/HDLC Ratio

LDL/HDL Ratio

Non HDL Cholesterol

Also known as: Homocysteine, Homocysteine Cardiovascular

HOMOCYSTEINE,

Also known as: Lipoprotein A, Lp (a), Lp(a)

Lipoprotein (A)

Lipoprotein-a, or Lp(a) are molecules made of proteins and fat. They carry cholesterol and similar substances through the blood. A high level of Lp(a) is considered a risk factor for heart disease. High levels of lipoproteins can increase the risk of heart disease. The test is done to check your risk of atherosclerosis, stroke, and heart attack.

Also known as: Factor I, Fibrinogen, Fibrinogen Activity Clauss

Fibrinogen Activity,

Fibrinogen is a protein produced by the liver. This protein helps stop bleeding by helping blood clots to form. A blood test can be done to tell how much fibrinogen you have in the blood.

FIBRINOGEN QN

Glucose

A blood glucose test measures the amount of a sugar called glucose in a sample of your blood. Glucose is a major source of energy for most cells of the body, including those in the brain. The hormones insulin and glucagon help control blood glucose levels.

Also known as: A1c, Glycated Hemoglobin, Glycohemoglobin, Glycosylated Hemoglobin, HA1c, HbA1c, Hemoglobin A1c, Hemoglobin A1c HgbA1C, Hgb A1c

Hemoglobin A1c

The A1c test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the last 2 to 3 months. It does this by measuring the concentration of glycated (also often called glycosylated) hemoglobin A1c. Hemoglobin is an oxygen-transporting protein found inside red blood cells (RBCs). There are several types of normal hemoglobin, but the predominant form – about 95-98% – is hemoglobin A. As glucose circulates in the blood, some of it spontaneously binds to hemoglobin A. The hemoglobin molecules with attached glucose are called glycated hemoglobin. The higher the concentration of glucose in the blood, the more glycated hemoglobin is formed. Once the glucose binds to the hemoglobin, it remains there for the life of the red blood cell – normally about 120 days. The predominant form of glycated hemoglobin is referred to as HbA1c or A1c. A1c is produced on a daily basis and slowly cleared from the blood as older RBCs die and younger RBCs (with non-glycated hemoglobin) take their place. This test is used to monitor treatment in someone who has been diagnosed with diabetes. It helps to evaluate how well their glucose levels have been controlled by treatment over time. This test may be used to screen for and diagnose diabetes or risk of developing diabetes. In 2010, clinical practice guidelines from the American Diabetes Association (ADA) stated that A1c may be added to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as an option for diabetes screening and diagnosis. For monitoring purposes, an A1c of less than 7% indicates good glucose control and a lower risk of diabetic complications for the majority of diabetics. However, in 2012, the ADA and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) issued a position statement recommending that the management of glucose control in type 2 diabetes be more "patient-centered." Data from recent studies have shown that low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can cause complications and that people with risk of severe hypoglycemia, underlying health conditions, complications, and a limited life expectancy do not necessarily benefit from having a stringent goal of less than 7% for their A1c. The statement recommends that people work closely with their doctor to select a goal that reflects each person's individual health status and that balances risks and benefits.

GLYCOHEMOGLOBIN

ESTIMATED AVG GLUC

Also known as: Insulin (fasting)

Insulin

Insulin is a hormone that is produced and stored in the beta cells of the pancreas. It is vital for the transportation and storage of glucose at the cellular level, helps regulate blood glucose levels, and has a role in lipid metabolism. When blood glucose levels rise after a meal, insulin is released to allow glucose to move into tissue cells, especially muscle and adipose (fat) cells, where is it is used for energy production. Insulin then prompts the liver to either store the remaining excess blood glucose as glycogen for short-term energy storage and/or to use it to produce fatty acids. The fatty acids are eventually used by adipose tissue to synthesize triglycerides to form the basis of a longer term, more concentrated form of energy storage. Without insulin, glucose cannot reach most of the body's cells. Without glucose, the cells starve and blood glucose levels rise to unhealthy levels. This can cause disturbances in normal metabolic processes that result in various disorders, including kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, and vision and neurological problems. Thus, diabetes, a disorder associated with decreased insulin effects, is eventually a life-threatening condition.

Apolipoprotein A1

Apolipoprotein B

Apolipoprotein B/A1 Ratio

Apo B/A1 Ratio

The apo B/A-I Ratio -- A Stronger Predictor of Cardiovascular Events Than LDL, HDL, or Total Cholesterol, Triglycerides, or Lipid Ratios

Also known as: Thyroid Stimulating Hormone, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyrotropin

TSH

A TSH test is a lab test that measures the amount of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in your blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland. It tells the thyroid gland to make and release thyroid hormones into the blood.

Also known as: Arachidonic Acid (AA), Arachidonic Acid/EPA Ratio, DHA, EPA, Omega-3 Index, Omega-6/omega-3 Ratio, Omega3 and 6 Fatty Acids Plasma, Phospholipid Omega-3 Fatty Acid, Phospholipid Omega-6 Fatty Acid, Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFAs)

OMEGA 3 (EPA+DHA) INDEX

Omega-3 (n-3 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Humans must eat them through food, which means getting EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) and DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) from seafood, such as salmon, tuna, sardines, mackerel or shellfish, and ALA (alpha-linolenic acid) from sources such as walnuts, flaxseed, and canola and soybean oils. Omega-3 fatty acids, particularly EPA and DHA, have been shown to benefit the heart of healthy people, and those at high risk for — or who already have — cardiovascular disease.

RISK

OMEGA 6/OMEGA 3 RATIO

Omega-6 (n-6 polyunsaturated) fatty acids are the other group of essential fats that your body needs to function properly but does not make. Hence, they need to be consumed in the diet. Food sources of omega-6 fatty acids include some vegetable oils (soybean, safflower, sunflower or corn oils), nuts and seeds. Increased consumption of omega-6 fatty acids in place of saturated fats and trans fats is associated with a decreased risk of coronary heart disease.

ARACHIDONIC ACID/EPA

Arachidonic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain, muscles, and liver. In addition to being involved in cellular signaling as a lipid second messenger involved in the regulation of signaling enzymes, such as PLC-γ, PLC-δ, and PKC-α, -β, and -γ isoforms, arachidonic acid is a key inflammatory intermediate and can also act as a vasodilator

ARACHIDONIC ACID

Arachidonic acid is a polyunsaturated fatty acid present in the phospholipids (especially phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylinositides) of membranes of the body's cells, and is abundant in the brain, muscles, and liver. In addition to being involved in cellular signaling as a lipid second messenger involved in the regulation of signaling enzymes, such as PLC-γ, PLC-δ, and PKC-α, -β, and -γ isoforms, arachidonic acid is a key inflammatory intermediate and can also act as a vasodilator

EPA

The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are found in seafood, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, tuna, and trout) and shellfish (e.g., crab, mussels, and oysters).

DHA

The omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA are found in seafood, such as fatty fish (e.g., salmon, tuna, and trout) and shellfish (e.g., crab, mussels, and oysters).

Also known as: Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility , HDL Subfractions, IDL Subfractions, LDL Subfractions, Lipoprotein Fraction, Lipoprotein Fractionation, Lipoprotein Fractionation Ion Mobility Cardio IQ, Quest Diagnostics has replaced the VAP® Cholesterol Test with Lipoprotein Fractionation, Ion Mobility, Cardio IQ™ test

LDL Particle Number

LDL Peak Size

LDL Pattern

HDL Large

LDL Small

LDL Medium

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D2

Vitamin D2 ((ergocalciferol,) is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D2 is effective when it is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, D3

Vitamin D3 (cholecalcifero) which comes from animals. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D3 are is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

Vitamin D, 25-Oh, Total

Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The chemical structures of the types of vitamin D are slightly different, and they are named vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which comes from plants) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which comes from animals). The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D3 is the form produced in the body and is also used in some supplements. Vitamin D2 and D3 are equally effective when they are converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.

VITAMIN D, 25 OH, D2

Vitamin D2 ((ergocalciferol,) is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D comes from two sources: endogenous, which is produced in the skin on exposure to sunlight, and exogenous, which is ingested in foods and supplements. The D2 form is found in fortified foods and in most vitamin preparations and supplements. Vitamin D2 is effective when it is converted by the liver and the kidney into the active form, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D.