Most Popular Tests

Most Popular Tests


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Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) Useful in predicting risk for cardiovascular disease.


A complete blood count is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia and inflammatory processes.

Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimens: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube labe

Clinical Significance

C. trachomatis infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases in the united states. C. trachomatis is known to cause cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymitis and proctitis. It is also the most frequent cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. Among women, the consequences of chlamydial infections are severe if left untreated. Approximately half of chlamydial infections are asymptomatic.


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Cortisol is increased in Cushing's Disease and decreased in Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency). Patient needs to have the specimen collected between 7 a.m.-9 a.m.


DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.


Measuring the circulating levels of estradiol is important for assessing the ovarian function and monitoring follicular development for assisted reproduction protocols. Estradiol plays an essential role throughout the human menstrual cycle. Elevated estradiol levels in females may also result from primary or secondary ovarian hyperfunction. Very high estradiol levels are found during the induction of ovulation for assisted reproduction therapy or in pregnancy. Decreased estradiol levels in females may result from either lack of ovarian synthesis (primary ovarian hypofunction and menopause) or a lesion in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis (secondary ovarian hypofunction). Elevated estradiol levels in males may be due to increased aromatization of androgens, resulting in gynecomastia.

IMPORTANT - Note the Estradiol test included in this panel is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute Estradiol, Free, LC/MS/MS at an additional fee of $290.00


Estrone is primarily derived from metabolism of androstenedione in peripheral tissues, especially adipose tissues. Individuals with obesity have increased conversion of androstenedione to Estrone leading to higher concentrations. In addition, an increase in the ratio of Estrone to Estradiol may be useful in assessing menopause in women.

The fecal occult blood test is an immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test that qualitatively detects human hemoglobin from blood in fecal samples. This is a useful screening aid for detecting primarily lower gastrointestinal (G.I.) disorders that may be related to iron deficiency anemia, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, polyps, adenomas, colorectal cancers or other G.I. lesions that can bleed. It is recommended for use by health professionals as part of routine physical examinations and in screening for colorectal cancer or other sources of lower G.I. bleeding.

FSH and LH are secreted by the anterior pituitary in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) secreted by the hypothalamus. In both males and females, FSH and LH secretion is regulated by a balance of positive and negative feedback mechanisms involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the reproductive organs, and the pituitary and sex steroid hormones. FSH and LH play a critical role in maintaining the normal function of the male and female reproductive systems. Abnormal FSH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of LH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased FSH levels are associated with menopause and primary ovarian hypofunction in females and primary hypogonadism in males. Decreased levels of FSH are associated with primary ovarian hyper-function in females and primary hypergonadism in males. Normal or decreased levels of FSH are associated with polycystic ovary disease in females. In males, LH is also called interstitial cell-stimulating hormone (ICSH). Abnormal LH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of FSH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased LH levels are associated with menopause, primary ovarian hypofunction, and polycystic ovary disease in females and primary hypo-gonadism in males. Decreased LH levels are associated with primary ovarian hyperfunction in females and primary hyper-gonadism in males.

Functional Thyroid Panel contains the following tests.

  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)
  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)
  • Ferritin
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Insulin
  • Lipid Panel With Ratios
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4 (Thyroxine), Total
  • T4, Free
  • Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies
  • TSH

Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA 

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimen: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

2 mL urine using APTIMA® Urine Specimen Collection Kit.

Alternative Specimen(s) 

Urine (no preservatives): 2 mL of urine, specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® Urine Transport Medium within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed • ThinPrep® vial • SurePath™ vial

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube label.

Transport Container 

APTIMA® Transport tube


Assesses long term diabetic control in diabetes mellit

Hepatitis A & B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis A & B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A and B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for both Hepatitis A and B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A and B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A or B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

 


Hepatitis A Antibody Test to diagnose the Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) in the blood. The hepatitis A test looks for antibodies to the HAV virus in the blood. These antibodies are proteins made by the body in response to the presence of the hepatitis A virus. Our type- specific hepatitis A antibody test is used to determine whether a person is or has been infected with the hepatitis A virus.

Hepatitis A Antibody, Total

This test is used to help diagnose a liver infection due to the hepatitis A virus. There are several causes of hepatitis and the accompanying symptoms, so this test may be used to determine if the symptoms are due to hepatitis A.

The total Hepatitis A antibody test detects both IgM and IgG antibodies and thus may be used to identify both current and past infections. This test will also be positive after receiving the vaccine, so sometimes it may be used to determine whether a person has developed immunity after vaccination.

A positive result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates  exposure to hepatitis A vairus but does not rule out acute infection. 

A Negative result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates no current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be recommended if at risk.


Hepatitis A Titer Test

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody

The Hepatitis A Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis A Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis A.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

The Hepatitis B test detects acute hepatitis B infections, and can also be used to help diagnose chronic hepatitis B infections. Detecting an early hepatitis B infection is important to avoid health complications. If the HBV test positive returns a positive result for hepatitis B, our labs will automatically run a confirmation test at no additional cost– This ensures that you receive the most sensitive and accurate results.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation: Positive samples will be confirmed

Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG) Detects protein that is present on the surface of the virus.  It is used to screen for, detect, and help diagnose acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections; earliest routine indicator of acute hepatitis B and frequently identifies infected people before symptoms appear; undetectable in the blood during the recovery period; it is the primary way of identifying those with chronic infections, including "hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier" state.

Clinical Significance

Surface antigen usually appears in the serum after an incubation period of 1 to 6 months following exposure to Hepatitis B virus and peaks shortly after onset of symptoms. It typically disappears within 1 to 3 months. Persistence of Hepatitis B surface antigen for greater than 6 months is a prognostic indicator of chronic Hepatitis B infection.


Hepatitis B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection.

Hepatitis C Antibody, HCV RNA & Liver Panel

  • Hepatitis C Antibody
  • Hepatitis C Virus RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR
  • Hepatic Function Panel

Hepatitis C antibody tests are used to screen individuals for the infection, including, people with no signs or symptoms but with risk factors, people who have symptoms associated with hepatitis or liver disease, or those who have been exposed to the virus.

Since the antibody test can remain positive for most people even if they have cleared the infection, this panel includes a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects the genetic material of the virus. A positive result on the RNA test means the virus is present, the infection has not resolved, and the person may require treatment. The liver panel is included to assess the health of the liver.

An HCV antibody test is typically reported as "positive" or "negative."

Results of Hepatitis C Virus RNA testing are reported as a number if virus is present. If no virus is present or if the amount of virus is too low to detect, the result is often reported as "negative" or "not detected."

Interpretation of the HCV screening and follow-up tests is shown below. In general, if the HCV antibody test is positive, then the individual tested is infected or has likely been infected at some time with hepatitis C. If the Hepatitis C Virus RNA test is positive, then the person has a current infection. If no Hepatitis C Virus RNA is detected, then the person either does not have an active infection or the virus is present in very low numbers.

HCV Antibody = Negative

No infection or too early after exposure for the test to be accurate; if suspicion remains high, retesting at a later time may be required.

_________________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Negative

Past infection or no infection (false-positive screen); additional testing if indicated

_____________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Weak or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Positive

Current infection


Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibody (HerpeSelect®) 

Tests for HSV 1 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB to diagnose HSV-1 infection when lesions are absent. A positive HSV-1 IgG antibody test indicates a previous infection.

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative 
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal 
  • >1.09 Positive 

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.


Herpes Simplex Virus 1/2 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibodies (HerpeSelect®) 

  1. HSV 1 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB
  2. HSV 2 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB

Diagnose HSV infection when lesions are absent; determine HSV type

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal
  • >1.09 Positive

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV Type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV Type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.


Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibody (HerpeSelect®) 

HSV 2 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB - Diagnose HSV-2 infection when lesions are absent.

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal
  • >1.09 Positive

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.