Most Popular Tests

Most Popular Tests


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Increased CRP levels are found in inflammatory conditions including: bacterial infection, rheumatic fever, active arthritis, myocardial infarction, malignancies and in the post-operative state. This test cannot detect the relatively small elevations of CRP that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk.

C-Reactive Protein Cardiac (hs CRP) Useful in predicting risk for cardiovascular disease.


A complete blood count is used as a screening test for various disease states including anemia, leukemia and inflammatory processes.

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Cortisol is increased in Cushing's Disease and decreased in Addison's Disease (adrenal insufficiency). Patient needs to have the specimen collected between 7 a.m.-9 a.m.


DHEA-S is the sulfated form of DHEA and is the major androgen produced by the adrenal glands. This test is used in the differential diagnosis of hirsute or virilized female patients and for the diagnosis of isolated premature adrenarche and adrenal tumors. About 10% of hirsute women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) have elevated DHEA-S but normal levels of other androgens.


Measuring the circulating levels of estradiol is important for assessing the ovarian function and monitoring follicular development for assisted reproduction protocols. Estradiol plays an essential role throughout the human menstrual cycle. Elevated estradiol levels in females may also result from primary or secondary ovarian hyperfunction. Very high estradiol levels are found during the induction of ovulation for assisted reproduction therapy or in pregnancy. Decreased estradiol levels in females may result from either lack of ovarian synthesis (primary ovarian hypofunction and menopause) or a lesion in the hypothalamus-pituitary axis (secondary ovarian hypofunction). Elevated estradiol levels in males may be due to increased aromatization of androgens, resulting in gynecomastia.

IMPORTANT - Note the Estradiol test included in this panel is not for children that have yet to start their menstrual cycle.  If this test is ordered for a child that has yet to begin their menstrual cycle Quest Diagnostics labs will substitute Estradiol, Free, LC/MS/MS at an additional fee of $290.00


Estrone is primarily derived from metabolism of androstenedione in peripheral tissues, especially adipose tissues. Individuals with obesity have increased conversion of androstenedione to Estrone leading to higher concentrations. In addition, an increase in the ratio of Estrone to Estradiol may be useful in assessing menopause in women.

The fecal occult blood test is an immunochromatographic fecal occult blood test that qualitatively detects human hemoglobin from blood in fecal samples. This is a useful screening aid for detecting primarily lower gastrointestinal (G.I.) disorders that may be related to iron deficiency anemia, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, polyps, adenomas, colorectal cancers or other G.I. lesions that can bleed. It is recommended for use by health professionals as part of routine physical examinations and in screening for colorectal cancer or other sources of lower G.I. bleeding.

FSH and LH are secreted by the anterior pituitary in response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) secreted by the hypothalamus. In both males and females, FSH and LH secretion is regulated by a balance of positive and negative feedback mechanisms involving the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the reproductive organs, and the pituitary and sex steroid hormones. FSH and LH play a critical role in maintaining the normal function of the male and female reproductive systems. Abnormal FSH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of LH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased FSH levels are associated with menopause and primary ovarian hypofunction in females and primary hypogonadism in males. Decreased levels of FSH are associated with primary ovarian hyper-function in females and primary hypergonadism in males. Normal or decreased levels of FSH are associated with polycystic ovary disease in females. In males, LH is also called interstitial cell-stimulating hormone (ICSH). Abnormal LH levels with corresponding increased or decreased levels of FSH, estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone are associated with a number of pathological conditions. Increased LH levels are associated with menopause, primary ovarian hypofunction, and polycystic ovary disease in females and primary hypo-gonadism in males. Decreased LH levels are associated with primary ovarian hyperfunction in females and primary hyper-gonadism in males.

Assesses long term diabetic control in diabetes mellit

A lipid panel includes:Total cholesterol —this test measures all of the cholesterol in all the lipoprotein particles.High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) — measures the cholesterol in HDL particles; often called "good cholesterol" because it removes excess cholesterol and carries it to the liver for removal.Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) — calculates the cholesterol in LDL particles; often called "bad cholesterol" because it deposits excess cholesterol in walls of blood vessels, which can contribute to atherosclerosis. Usually, the amount of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is calculated using the results of total cholesterol, HDL-C, and triglycerides.Triglycerides — measures all the triglycerides in all the lipoprotein particles; most is in the very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).Very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) — calculated from triglycerides/5; this formula is based on the typical composition of VLDL particles.Non-HDL-C — calculated from total cholesterol minus HDL-C.Cholesterol/HDL ratio — calculated ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C.


The MP - Mini Thyroid Panel contains the following tests:

  • Ferritin
  • QuestAssureD™ 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies
  • TSH

 


Levels increase sharply during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The level increases from 9 to 32 weeks of pregnancy.

Elevated serum PSA concentrations have been reported in men with prostate cancer, benign prostatic hypertrophy, and inflammatory conditions of the prostate.

Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone and estrogens circulate in serum bound to Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG). SHBG concentrations are increased in pregnancy, hyperthyroidism, cirrhosis, oral estrogen administration and by certain drugs. Concentrations are decreased by testosterone, hypothyroidism, Cushings syndrome, acromegaly and obesity

The assay may be useful in the diagnosis of nonthyroidal illness (NTI). Patients with NTI have low T3 concentrations and increased concentrations of rT3. RT3 may be useful in neonates to distinguish euthyroid sick syndrome from central hypothyroidism.

Total T3 measurements are used to diagnose and monitor treatment of hyperthyroidism and are essential for recognizing T3 toxicosis

Decreased: Pregnancy, estrogens, hyperproteinemia, acute intermittent porphyria.Increased: Androgens, hyperproteinemia, stress, acute liver disease.

This test is used to diagnose hyperthyroidism and to clarify thyroid status in the presence of a possible protein binding abnormality.

For diagnosis of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism.

The free T4 are tests thelps evaluate thyroid function. The free T4 test is used to help diagnose hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Free T4 is the active form of thyroxine and is usually ordered along with or following a TSH test. This helps the doctor to determine whether the thyroid hormone feedback system is functioning as it should, and the results of the tests help to distinguish between different causes of hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism.

The measurement of TBG can be used to establish the presence of TBG deficiency or excess suggested by abnormal Total serum T4 and T3 concentrations in the presence of normal free levels of these hormones. Definitive documentation of a TBG derangement may avoid unnecessary diagnostic procedures and therapy in individuals with harmless congenital TBG anomalies, and in their relatives.