Most Popular Tests

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Cardio IQ® Lipoprotein Subfractionation, Ion Mobility

Clinical Significance

There is a correlation between increased risk of premature heart disease with decreasing size of LDL particles. Ion mobility offers the only direct measurement of lipoprotein particle size and concentration for each lipoprotein from HDL3 to large VLDL.

Includes

HDL Particle Number; LDL Particle Number; Non-HDL Particle Number; HDL, Small; HDL Large; LDL, Very Small-d; LDL, Very Small-c; LDL, Very Small-b; LDL, Very Small-a; LDL Small; LDL Medium; LDL, Large-b; LDL, Large-a; IDL, Small; IDL, Large; VLDL, Small; VLDL, Medium; VLDL, Large; LDL Pattern; LDL Peak Size

Patient Preparation

Fasting preferred

Methodology

Ion Mobility

 


Chlamydia trachomatis RNA, TMA

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimens: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube labe

Clinical Significance

C. trachomatis infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases in the united states. C. trachomatis is known to cause cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymitis and proctitis. It is also the most frequent cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. Among women, the consequences of chlamydial infections are severe if left untreated. Approximately half of chlamydial infections are asymptomatic.


Chlamydia/Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimen: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube label.

 

Clinical Significance

C. trachomatis infections are the leading cause of sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. C. trachomatis is known to cause cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), epididymitis and proctitis. It is also the most frequent cause of non-gonococcal urethritis in men. Among women, the consequences of Chlamydialinfections are severe if left untreated. Approximately half of Chlamydial infections are asymptomatic.
Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci) is the causative agent of gonorrhea. In men, this disease generally results in anterior urethritis accompanied by purulent exudate. In women, the disease is most often found in the cervix, but the vagina and uterus may also be infected.


Comprehensive Wellness Profile (CWP) + Vit D



Neisseria gonorrhoeae RNA, TMA 

Patient Preparation 

Urine specimen: The patient should not have urinated for at least one hour prior to specimen collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen.

2 mL urine using APTIMA® Urine Specimen Collection Kit.

Alternative Specimen(s) 

Urine (no preservatives): 2 mL of urine, specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® Urine Transport Medium within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed • ThinPrep® vial • SurePath™ vial

Urine: Patient should not have urinated within one hour prior to collection. Female patients should not cleanse the labial area prior to providing the specimen. Direct patient to provide a first-catch urine (a maximum of 20-30 mL of the initial urine stream) into a urine collection cup free of any preservatives. 2 mL of urine specimen must be transferred into the APTIMA® specimen transport within 24 hours of collection and before being assayed. Use tube provided in the urine specimen collection kit for urine specimens. The fluid (urine plus transport media) level in the urine tube must fall within the clear pane on the tube label.

Transport Container 

APTIMA® Transport tube


Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease and a thyroid disorder, therefor one must evaluate many things not just the thyroid. This panel contains tests for Hashimoto’s.

Thyroid tests

  • T3 Reverse (RT3), LC/MS/MS
  • T3, Free
  • T4, Free
  • TSH

Blood Sugar and Cholesterol Analysis

  • Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1C)
  • Lipid Panel with Ratios

Iron

  • Iron and Total Iron Binding Capacity (TIBC)

Vitamin D2, D3

  • Vitamin D-  25-Hydroxyvitamin D (D2, D3), LC/MS/MS

Vitamin B12 and B6

  • Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)
  • Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxal Phosphate)

Red and White Blood Cell Count

  • CBC (includes Differential and Platelets)

Adrenal Gland Health and Electrolytes

  • Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP)

Autoantibodies

  • Thyroid Peroxidase and Thyroglobulin Antibodies

 


Hepatitis A & B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis A & B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A and B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for both Hepatitis A and B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A and B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A or B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

 


Hepatitis A Antibody Test to diagnose the Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) in the blood. The hepatitis A test looks for antibodies to the HAV virus in the blood. These antibodies are proteins made by the body in response to the presence of the hepatitis A virus. Our type- specific hepatitis A antibody test is used to determine whether a person is or has been infected with the hepatitis A virus.

Hepatitis A Antibody, Total

This test is used to help diagnose a liver infection due to the hepatitis A virus. There are several causes of hepatitis and the accompanying symptoms, so this test may be used to determine if the symptoms are due to hepatitis A.

The total Hepatitis A antibody test detects both IgM and IgG antibodies and thus may be used to identify both current and past infections. This test will also be positive after receiving the vaccine, so sometimes it may be used to determine whether a person has developed immunity after vaccination.

A positive result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates  exposure to hepatitis A vairus but does not rule out acute infection. 

A Negative result Hepatitis A Antibody, Total that is not accompanied with Hepatitis A IgM test indicates no current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be recommended if at risk.


Hepatitis A Titer Test Panel

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody

The Hepatitis A Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis A or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis A Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis A.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis A can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis A and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis A immunity

Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total = Positive
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No active infection but previous HAV exposure; has developed immunity to HAV or recently vaccinated for HAV

No Immunity

  • Hepatitis A Antibody, Total= Negative
  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Negative

No current or previous HAV infection; vaccine may be advised if at risk

HEPATITIS A INFECTION

  • Hepatitis A IgM Antibody = Positive   A positive result indicates an acute or recent infection

The Hepatitis B test detects acute hepatitis B infections, and can also be used to help diagnose chronic hepatitis B infections. Detecting an early hepatitis B infection is important to avoid health complications. If the HBV test positive returns a positive result for hepatitis B, our labs will automatically run a confirmation test at no additional cost– This ensures that you receive the most sensitive and accurate results.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation: Positive samples will be confirmed

Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG) Detects protein that is present on the surface of the virus.  It is used to screen for, detect, and help diagnose acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections; earliest routine indicator of acute hepatitis B and frequently identifies infected people before symptoms appear; undetectable in the blood during the recovery period; it is the primary way of identifying those with chronic infections, including "hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier" state.

Clinical Significance

Surface antigen usually appears in the serum after an incubation period of 1 to 6 months following exposure to Hepatitis B virus and peaks shortly after onset of symptoms. It typically disappears within 1 to 3 months. Persistence of Hepatitis B surface antigen for greater than 6 months is a prognostic indicator of chronic Hepatitis B infection.


Hepatitis B Titer Test

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen with Reflex Confirmation
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Immunity, Quantitative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total

The Hepatitis B Titer Test is ordered when a person needs proof of immunity to Hepatitis B or just want to check their immune status.

The Hepatitis Titer Test includes immunity testing for Hepatitis B.  Hepatitis is a viral disease which affects the liver.  Vaccinations for Hepatitis B can provide protective antibodies which immunize a person from catching the virus.  Additionally, a person who has been affected by Hepatitis B and recovers can develop natural immunity.  Titer testing looks for the antibodies which typically indicate that a person is immune to a particular virus or infection.

Hepatitis B Immunity

Not Immune and no active or prior infection; may be a good candidate for vaccine

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

Immunity due to vaccination

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Negative
  • Hepatitis B Surface Antibody (Anti-HBs) = Positive
  • Hepatitis B Core Antibody, Total (Anti-HBc IgG+IgM) = Negative

HEPATITIS B INFECTION

  • Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) = Positive  A positive result indicates an infection, usually with symptoms; contagious; could also be a flare of a chronic infection.

Hepatitis C Antibody, HCV RNA & Liver Panel

  • Hepatitis C Antibody
  • Hepatitis C Virus RNA, Quantitative, Real-Time PCR
  • Hepatic Function Panel

Hepatitis C antibody tests are used to screen individuals for the infection, including, people with no signs or symptoms but with risk factors, people who have symptoms associated with hepatitis or liver disease, or those who have been exposed to the virus.

Since the antibody test can remain positive for most people even if they have cleared the infection, this panel includes a hepatitis C RNA test, which detects the genetic material of the virus. A positive result on the RNA test means the virus is present, the infection has not resolved, and the person may require treatment. The liver panel is included to assess the health of the liver.

An HCV antibody test is typically reported as "positive" or "negative."

Results of Hepatitis C Virus RNA testing are reported as a number if virus is present. If no virus is present or if the amount of virus is too low to detect, the result is often reported as "negative" or "not detected."

Interpretation of the HCV screening and follow-up tests is shown below. In general, if the HCV antibody test is positive, then the individual tested is infected or has likely been infected at some time with hepatitis C. If the Hepatitis C Virus RNA test is positive, then the person has a current infection. If no Hepatitis C Virus RNA is detected, then the person either does not have an active infection or the virus is present in very low numbers.

HCV Antibody = Negative

No infection or too early after exposure for the test to be accurate; if suspicion remains high, retesting at a later time may be required.

_________________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Negative

Past infection or no infection (false-positive screen); additional testing if indicated

_____________________

HCV Antibody = Positive or Weak or Indeterminate

HCV RNA = Positive

Current infection


Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibody (HerpeSelect®) 

Tests for HSV 1 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB to diagnose HSV-1 infection when lesions are absent. A positive HSV-1 IgG antibody test indicates a previous infection.

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative 
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal 
  • >1.09 Positive 

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.


Herpes Simplex Virus 1/2 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibodies (HerpeSelect®) 

  1. HSV 1 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB
  2. HSV 2 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB

Diagnose HSV infection when lesions are absent; determine HSV type

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal
  • >1.09 Positive

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV Type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV Type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.


Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (IgG), Type-Specific Antibody (HerpeSelect®) 

HSV 2 IGG, TYPE SPECIFIC AB - Diagnose HSV-2 infection when lesions are absent.

Reference Range(s)

Index Interpretation

  • <0.90 Negative
  • 0.90-1.09 Equivocal
  • >1.09 Positive

This assay utilizes recombinant type-specific antigens to differentiate HSV-1 from HSV-2 infections. A index positive result cannot distinguish between recent and past infection. If recent HSV infection is suspected but the results are negative or equivocal, the assay should be repeated in 4-6 weeks. The performance index characteristics of the assay have not been established for pediatric populations, immunocompromised patients, or neonatal screening.

Limitations

Individuals infected with HSV may not exhibit detectable IgG antibody in the early stages of infection.

Clinical Significance

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) is responsible for several clinically significant human viral diseases, with severity ranging from inapparent to fatal. Clinical manifestations include genital tract infections, neonatal herpes, meningoencephalitis, keratoconjunctivitis, and gingivostomatitis. There are two HSV serotypes that are closely related antigenically. HSV type 2 is more commonly associated with genital tract and neonatal infections, while HSV type 1 is more commonly associated with infections of non-genital sites. Specific typing is not usually required for diagnosis or treatment. The mean time to seroconversion using the type specific assay is 25 days. The performance of this assay has not been established for use in a pediatric population, for neonatal screening, or for testing of immunocompromised patients.


Clinical Significance

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), also known as platelet activating factor Acetylhydrolase, is an inflammatory enzyme that circulates bound mainly to low density lipoproteins and has been found to be localized and enriched in atherosclerotic plaques. In multiple clinical trials, Lp-PLA2 activity has been shown to be an independent predictor of coronary heart disease and stroke in the general population. Measurement of Lp-PLA2 may be used along with traditional cardiovascular risk factor measures for identifying individuals at higher risk of cardiovascular disease events. Clinical management may include beginning or intensifying risk reduction strategies. The activity assay is an enzyme assay run on an automated chemistry platform.


Measles Immunity Test - to establish whether you have immunity to measles due to a previous infection or to vaccination.

Measles, also known as rubeola, causes fever, irritability, respiratory illness, and the characteristic skin rash. Immunization has greatly diminished the incidence of measles. The presence of IgG is consistent with immunity or prior exposure. 

Alternate Test Name: Measles Antibody IgG


Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR) Immunity Profile

MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


MMR (IgG) Panel (Measles, Mumps, Rubella) Titers - Includes Measles Antibody (IgG), Mumps Antibody (IgG), Rubella Immune Status

This panel provides presumptive evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, and rubella for purposes of routine vaccination, for students at post-high school educational institutions, and for international travelers.

 


Syphilis (RPR + FTA-ABS)

  • FTA-ABS - Treponema pallidum Ab (Confirmation for Syphilis RPR test).
  • Syphilis RPR ( RPR (Monitor) with Reflex to Titer)

FTA-ABS - Treponema pallidum Ab

Clinical Significance

The FTA-ABS is a specific treponemal assay to detect antibody to t. Pallidum. The FTA-ABS becomes reactive 4-6 weeks after infection. Unlike the nontreponemal tests, once the FTA-ABS test becomes reactive, it will remain reactive for many years. Since the reactivity found with the FTA-ABS does not indicate response to therapy, it is not suitable for monitoring treatment. The FTA-ABS test does not distinguish between syphillis and other treponematoses such as yaws, pinta and bejil.

The treponemal antibody test (FTA-ABS) is often used as an initial test. A positive result indicates the presence of syphilis antibodies in the blood, but since treponemal antibodies remain positive even after an infection has been treated, it does not indicate whether the person has a current infection or was infected in the past. Conversely, nontreponemal antibodies as detected with an RPR typically disappear in an adequately treated person after about 3 years. Thus, if an initial treponemal test is positive, an RPR can be performed to differentiate between an active or past infection. In this case, a positive RPR would confirm that the person has been exposed to syphilis and, if not treated previously, has an active infection or, if treatment had occurred more than 3 years ago, possible re-infection.

Alternative Name(s) 

Treponemal pallidum, Fluorescent Treponemal Antigen, Syphilis

 

Syphilis RPR ( RPR (Monitor) with Reflex to Titer)

Reference Range(s)

Non-Reactive

Clinical Significance

This is a non-treponemal screening test for syphilis. False positive results may occur due to systemic lupus erythematosus, leprosy, brucellosis, atypical pneumonia, typhus, yaws, pinta, or pregnancy. Monitoring of RPR is helpful in assessing effectiveness of therapy.

IMPORTANT

A positive RPR screen and a positive result on the FTA-ABS confirms the screening result and the affected person is diagnosed with syphilis.

A negative result on the treponemal test may mean that the initial RPR test was falsely positive. Further testing and investigation may be done to determine the cause of the false positive.

Limitations

False-positive results have been associated in patients with infections, pregnancy, autoimmune disease, old age, Gaucher disease, and malignancy.

Alternative Name(s) 

Syphilis


The test of choice for accurate, global cardiometabolic riskstratifi cation and management• Provides comprehensive lipid analysis• Simultaneously and accurately measures cholesterol concentrations ofall 5 lipoprotein classes and their subclasses in a non-fasting patient20